1. Halliburton scandals

    05:10

    from frontview Added

    Dick Cheney as acting CEO of halliburton, deep water horizon.

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    • Part 6: Assessing the Impacts

      09:56

      from Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst. Added 54 0 0

      Science in a Time of Crisis Part 6: Assessing the Impacts Soon after the Deepwater Horizon blowout, scientists began exploring how the disaster might affect the Gulf ecosystem. Oil-drenched birds and fish are obvious victims, but potential damage extends to organisms at the seafloor, in the mud in of coastal marshes, and throughout the full depth of the water column. To learn more visit whoi.edu/deepwaterhorizon

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      • Part 3: Sampling the Source

        06:23

        from Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst. Added 20 0 0

        Science in a Time of Crisis Part 3: Sampling the Source After measuring the flow rate of the fluid spewing out of the broken wellhead, the next step for WHOI scientists was to get a pure, representative sample of the material. That was the only way the team would be able to figure out two critical pieces of information: the amount of oil in the mixture, and the chemical “fingerprint” of that oil. To learn more visit whoi.edu/deepwaterhorizon

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        • Part 5: Tracking the Currents

          04:40

          from Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst. Added 20 0 0

          Science in a Time of Crisis Part 5: Tracking the Currents Concern about the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill centered on the northern Gulf of Mexico, but some feared that oil might also reach the U.S. East Coast, via the “Loop Current.” If that happened, damage from the spill would be more widespread and cleanup efforts would have to encompass a much larger area. To learn more visit whoi.edu/deepwaterhorizon

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          • Part 4: Searching for the Plume

            07:19

            from Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst. Added 16 0 0

            Science in a Time of Crisis Part 4: Searching for the Plume Almost as soon as the spill began, speculation abounded about the fate of the oil. The slick on the surface was huge and spreading, but wasn’t big enough to account for all the oil gushing out of the broken wellhead. Since the source of the oil was more than a mile below the surface, it was reasonable to think that some—perhaps most—of it remained far below the surface, where it could threaten Gulf fisheries and deep-sea ecosystems. To learn more visit whoi.edu/deepwaterhorizon

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            • Part 2: How Much Oil?

              06:26

              from Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst. Added 60 0 0

              Science in a Time of Crisis Part 2: How Much Oil? One of the most important questions arising from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was exactly how much oil was released into the Gulf of Mexico. WHOI scientists brought an array of expertise to bear that was based on studies of hydrothermal vents in addressing that crucial point. To learn more visit whoi.edu/deepwaterhorizon

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              • Part 1: OIl Spill Pioneers

                06:08

                from Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst. Added 29 0 0

                Science in a Time of Crisis Part 1: OIl Spill Pioneers On Sept. 16, 1969, the barge Florida ran aground off Cape Cod, rupturing its hull and spilling more than 175,000 gallons of No. 2 fuel oil. Winds and waves pushed the oil onto the beaches and marshes of West Falmouth, Mass., on the figurative doorstep of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Marine chemists and biologists who usually worked on basic questions of oceanography applied their expertise and specialized techniques to the problems posed by the spill. In the process, they laid a foundation and a legacy for research on oil spills that were applied decades later to Deepwater Horizon. To learn more, visit whoi.edu/deepwaterhorizon

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                • Gulf Coast Recovery

                  09:11

                  from Thor Neureiter Added 76 0 0

                  I produced and edited this short documentary on the Fund for Gulf Communities for the Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors. The fund invested $20 million to help recovery efforts after BP's Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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                  • COMMON FATE - Maisha Baddoo (Water)

                    03:10

                    from Zeesy Powers Added 21 0 0

                    From Common Fate (2013). Choreography by Zeesy Powers and Maisha Baddoo. Animation by Zeesy Powers. Music by Andrew Zukerman. Produced with the generous assistance of the Ontario Arts Council.

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