1. Seeking Heartwood Kickstarter Video & Sample Interview

    08:32

    from Adam Eurich / Added

    63 Plays / / 0 Comments

    A brief promo video that I used for a successful Kickstarter campaign. Find out more about the project at www.seekingheartwood.com. Filmed with an AF100, GH2, HMC150 and GoPro.

    + More details
    • Kathina Celebration at Isipathana Forest Monastery Sri Lanka

      09:31

      from Nyanasara Thero / Added

      135 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Kathinā Report When Buddhism was first established in ancient India, there were few monks and nuns. The monks did not stay in temples but moved from one place to another. It was their mission to spread the teaching of the Buddha for the happiness and welfare of all living beings. In those days there were no paved roads, so the Buddha allowed his disciples to stop wandering and take up temporary abodes during the rainy season. This season is called Vassā in Pali, meaning "Rains Retreat". It begins in early July and continues through late October. This is a time of deep meditation and austerity, ending in a celebration where the congregation gifts new robes to the monks. Nowadays, lay followers prepare robes for the monks, who benefit them by accepting offerings of robes and other necessities. The Kathina ceremony takes place during the month immediately following the full moon day of October. Today a number of customs and practices of a collective life, including the recitation of rules and the distribution of robes, became incorporated into the annual cycle of monastic life. This historic ceremony, continuing through the ages, has evolved from culture to culture. Today in Sri Lanka, the Kathina ceremony provides one of the most popular occasions for merit-making. Buddhist people celebrate the robe-offering ceremony with profound respect and devotion to the monks, who have just spent three months in the monastery observing the Vassā. In rural Sri Lanka, everybody in a village participates in the Kathina ceremony at nearby temples as a community activity lasting from one to three days. Among the Buddhist of Southeast Asia, there is a very grand festival at the end of the observance of the Rains Retreat. People offer food to the monks in monasteries and prepare the special robes that are offered to the Sangha. This special offering is called the Kathina Offering Ceremony. It is done only during the period of time starting from the end of Rains Retreat to the first day of the waning moon of the 12th Lunar Month. Yesterday we celebrated Kathinā at our forest monastery in Sri Lanka. It was very beautiful, and a profound experience for me personally. Most importantly, I finally got to meet some of my superiors in the Order, and found the senior monks to be truly venerable and admirable beings. I have been deeply involved in religious and spiritual organizations since childhood. I was raised in a Christian household, but left that because of its hypocrisy. That started a search for truth that has taken me all over the world, researching the roots of all the major faiths in their countries of origin. Sadly, spiritual life and community are in sorry shape on our planet at this time. Error, deviation and corruption are much easier to find than authentic versions of any tradition. For many years I followed the Vedic spiritual path, and while my personal spiritual master was an admirable personality, his organization was rife with phony renunciants into power politics and the worst kinds of hypocrisy. I could never feel at home in that organization; and even when I left and started my own, it never felt right. I first encountered supposedly Buddhist teachings in America in the late 1960s. As a young man in search of truth, I naturally visited important places like Esalen, Tassajara Zen center and others. But something about the American ‘Buddhist’ teachings put me off. I wound up becoming a yogi, studying the Vedas in India and eventually becoming a guru myself. That feeling has only increased with time. Now that I actually know something about the Buddha’s teaching, whenever I hear what is being taught as ‘Buddhism’ in the West, I have to cringe. It is unrecognizable as Buddha’s teaching, mixed up with all kinds of mundane knowledge, or so twisted in its social manifestation that it resembles a business or a fundamentalist church more than the Sangha as the Buddha conceived it. One of my most severe doubts about accepting ordination as a Buddhist monk was that I would find the same nonsense here as well. I was fully prepared to spend the rest of my life as a recluse, rather than join another organization where the so-called ‘leaders’ are really wicked men posing as monks. My first experience of Buddhist society was in Thailand, where I went to study meditation. However, I found the best teacher in the books of Buddhadasa Bhikkhu, who unfortunately departed this world some time ago. The same corruption I experienced in India was quite prevalent in Thailand—jet-set monks showing up at the temple in chauffeured Mercedes, wearing Rolex watches and surrounded by pretty young boys. I’m sure there are some monasteries like that in Sri Lanka, but fortunately they are in the minority. The Buddha predicted that the Dhamma would be preserved in Sri Lanka better than anywhere else. My experience confirms the truth of this.

      + More details
      • The Urban Retreat 2013: Loving Kindness - Blazing Like The Sun, Course Material for Day 8 (Saturday)

        10:54

        from thebuddhistcentre / Added

        In this video, for the last day of the urban retreat, we're looking in more detail at the fifth stage of the metta bhavana ('development of loving kindness') meditation practice, where we expand our awareness outwards to include more people. For more resources and accompanying course materials, visit www.thebuddhistcentre.com/urbanretreat

        + More details
        • What a Difference a Dhammacharini Makes! (The Urban Retreat 2013: Loving Kindness - Blazing Like The Sun)

          08:21

          from thebuddhistcentre / Added

          As part of the 2013 Urban Retreat we're bringing you some inspiring little films from around the world where people are taking part in the metta revolution! This 8-minute video from Clear Vision looks at the ordination of women in India and its far-reaching effects. Thanks to Clear Vision for these! http://www.videosangha.net For more resources and accompanying course materials, visit www.thebuddhistcentre.com/urbanretreat Notes - A Dhammacharini is a female member of the Triratna Buddhist Order (using the Pali spelling used in India). The India Dhamma Trust raises money helping Indians to train for ordination. - Kalyana mitrata refers to spiritual friendship between Buddhists. - Dr Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar (1891-1956) was independent India's first law minister. Born Untouchable, he inspired a wave of social reform and mass conversions to Buddhism which continue to this day. www.indiadhammatrust.org/ Follow India Dhamma Trust on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/India-Dhamma-Trust/181745405197276

          + More details
          • Urban Retreat 2013: Daily Practice Reflection, Day 5 - Receiving Gifts & Expressing Gratitude

            01:31

            from thebuddhistcentre / Added

            Here is today's 'daily practice reflection' from Subhadramati, part of her series commissioned for the 2013 Urban Retreat -- a suggestion for taking the practice of metta (loving-kindness) off the meditation cushion and into your day. You'll see that today's exercise connects with the theme of metta for 'neutral' people -- those we don't feel a particular connection with. Based on Subhadramati's book 'Not About Being Good', available now: http://windhorsepublications.com/not_about_being_good For more resources and accompanying course materials, visit www.thebuddhistcentre.com/urbanretreat

            + More details
            • Manidha and Alice - Poems on Metta

              07:05

              from thebuddhistcentre / Added

              Manidha and Alice from Seattle in the U.S. sharing a collection of poems they feel inspired by when they think about metta and its central importance for the life of the heart. Drawing on different religious and spiritual traditions they bring out some of the qualities of metta and of a person turning their effort towards cultivating loving kindness in their life. Beautifully produced and read with the help of their friends in the Seattle Triratna Buddhist sangha!

              + More details
              • Urban Retreat 2013: Daily Practice Reflection, Day 6 - Identifying Imaginatively

                02:26

                from thebuddhistcentre / Added

                Here is todays 'daily practice reflection' from Subhadramati, specially commissioned for the 2013 Urban Retreat -- a suggestion for taking the practice of metta (loving-kindness) off the meditation cushion and into your day. This is a reflection that gets to the heart of what the metta bhavana practice is about, especially the fourth stage. Based on Subhadramati's book 'Not About Being Good', available now: http://windhorsepublications.com/not_about_being_good For more resources and accompanying course materials, visit www.thebuddhistcentre.com/urbanretreat

                + More details
                • Urban Retreat 2013: Daily Practice Reflection, Day 3 - Talking to Yourself

                  02:06

                  from thebuddhistcentre / Added

                  Here is another 'daily practice reflection' from Subhadramati, part of a series specially commissioned for the 2013 Urban Retreat -- a suggestion for taking the practice of metta (loving-kindness) off the meditation cushion and into your day. Today's exercise is all about how you talk to yourself... linking-in with the theme of self-metta. Based on Subhadramati's book 'Not About Being Good', available now: http://windhorsepublications.com/not_about_being_good For more resources and accompanying course materials, visit www.thebuddhistcentre.com/urbanretreat

                  + More details
                  • Urban Retreat 2013: Daily Practice Reflection, Day 2 - Looking Ahead and Being Vigilant

                    02:41

                    from thebuddhistcentre / Added

                    Here is a second 'daily practice reflection' from Subhadramati, adapted from her book: Not About Being Good and specially commissioned for the Urban Retreat 2013. It's about looking ahead and seeing what challenges might be round the corner -- what might happen even in the next few days that could prevent you keeping up a meditation practice, or being able to act from loving-kindness as you go about your life? Based on Subhadramati's book 'Not About Being Good', available now: http://windhorsepublications.com/not_about_being_good For more resources and accompanying course materials, visit www.thebuddhistcentre.com/urbanretreat

                    + More details
                    • Urban Retreat 2013: Daily Practice Reflection, Day 4 - Reaching Out

                      02:18

                      from thebuddhistcentre / Added

                      Here is todays 'daily practice reflection' from Subhadramati, part of her series specially commissioned for the 2013 Urban Retreat -- a suggestion for taking the practice of metta (loving-kindness) off the meditation cushion and into your day. Today's exercise is about reaching out to others, linking-in with the theme of expressing loving kindness to friends and others. Based on Subhadramati's book 'Not About Being Good', available now: http://windhorsepublications.com/not_about_being_good For more resources and accompanying course materials, visit www.thebuddhistcentre.com/urbanretreat

                      + More details

                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."