1. SiC 2014 - 4: Keynotes in conversation – Kathryn Eccles and Mia Ridge, 2014

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    Speakers: Kathryn Eccles, Research Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford and Mia Ridge, PhD in digital humanities, Department of History, Open University Moderator: Charlotte S.H. Jensen, web editor, The National Museum of Denmark

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    • SiC 2014-3: Enriching cultural heritage collections through participatory Commons platforms - Keynote by Mia Ridge

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      Speaker: Mia Ridge, PhD in digital humanities, Department of History, Open University Read the keynote [http://openobjects.blogspot.dk/2014/03/sharing-is-caring-keynote-enriching.html] Follow Mia Ridge at @mia_out Mia is currently researching a PhD in digital humanities (Department of History, Open University), focusing on historians and scholarly crowdsourcing. She has published and presented widely on her key areas of interest including: user experience design, human-computer interaction, open cultural data, audience engagement and crowdsourcing in the cultural heritage sector. Mia was formerly Lead Web Developer at the Science Museum Group, and has worked internationally as a business analyst, digital consultant and web programmer in the cultural heritage and commercial sectors. She is editor of the forthcoming volume ‘Crowdsourcing our Cultural Heritage’ (Ashgate, 2014). She keeps the blog Open Objects [http://openobjects.blogspot.dk/].

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      • SiC 2014 -2: Using crowdsourcing to understand public engagement with cultural heritage - Keynote by Kathryn Eccles

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        Speaker: Kathryn Eccles, Research Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford Follow Kathryn Eccles at @KathrynEccles Kathryn’s main interests lie within the field of Digital Humanities, focusing on the impact of new technologies on cultural heritage, and on scholarly behaviour and research. Her current research looks at the role of crowdsourcing in the arts, in particular the potential of new information and communication technologies to promote public engagement with and awareness of museum collections and to elicit new information about users and usage. This AHRC-funded research focused on the project Your Paintings [http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/] as the key case study. Kathryn talks about experiences with crowdsourcing efforts in the cultural heritage sector. More specifically, Kathryn will delve into how the national art-tagging project Your Paintings enhances search-ability and visibility of small and large English collections and the public ownership of shared heritage.

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        • DH in the Anthropocene

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          from Bethany Nowviskie / Added

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          Slides and audio from my Digital Humanities 2014 keynote talk: dh2014.org/program/keynotes/ A full transcript is available on my blog: nowviskie.org/2014/anthropocene/

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          • Wrkflux

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            Wrkflux is a flexible tool for design visual workflows. As an improvement of its previous version (Workflow for Journal Editors & Workflow for Document Production), Wrkflux enhanced the user experience and added a number of new functionalities in order to make it easy to use for a wider audience. The new features includes creation of personal profiles, ability to create and modify as many workflows you want, private workflows, flexible “stage” shapes, creation and modification of workflows items, possibility to customize flags, annotation tool (tags), and other management options. Wrkflux was developed in Flash/Air (AS3) and currently exists as a web-based application accessible from any browser or by its own standalone Air Application (Internet connection needed).

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            • Wrkflux

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              from Luciano Frizzera / Added

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              Wrkflux is a flexible tool for design visual workflows. As an improvement of its previous version (Workflow for Journal Editors & Workflow for Document Production), Wrkflux enhanced the user experience and added a number of new functionalities in order to make it easy to use for a wider audience. The new features includes creation of personal profiles, ability to create and modify as many workflows you want, private workflows, flexible “stage” shapes, creation and modification of workflows items, possibility to customize flags, annotation tool (tags), and other management options. Wrkflux was developed in Flash/Air (AS3) and currently exists as a web-based application accessible from any browser or by its own standalone Air Application (Internet connection needed).

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              • Digital Humanities Network Scotland

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                from HSS Webteam / Added

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                An introduction to Digital Humanities - what it is and what kinds of questions does it pose? How can it help and challenge traditional humanities research? What can the Digital Humanities Network Scotland do to help researchers?

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                • From Fragmentation to Reaggregation: Revealing a “Virtual” Medieval Library with Manuscriptlink

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                  From Fragmentation to Reaggregation: Revealing a “Virtual” Medieval Library with Manuscriptlink Eric J. Johnson Assistant Professor & Curator of Early Books and Manuscripts, Rare Books & Manuscripts Library The Ohio State University http://www.cni.org/topics/special-collections/manuscriptlink/ Since the emergence of the codex in the fourth century CE as the dominant format for book production in the West, manuscripts have been subject to fragmentation due to a variety of factors. They have fallen apart as a result of being “read to death”; their contents have become obsolete or gone out of style, leading later readers to recycle them for use as structural supports in early book bindings; and, perhaps most commonly over the past 200 years, they have been deliberately broken and cut apart to be repackaged as individual units for sale to an international community of art connoisseurs. Whether accidental or deliberate, these acts of fragmentation have destroyed the original textual, codicological, historical, and material contexts of medieval books, and the dispersal of these individual fragments to collectors (both private and institutional) around the world has made it almost impossible to reconstruct these original contexts in any meaningful way. Until now, that is. In November 2013 the University of South Carolina and The Ohio State University announced the launch of Manuscriptlink, an ambitious new digital humanities initiative that aims to reconstruct a “virtual” medieval library by collaborating with collections around the world to re-aggregate hundreds, if not thousands, of previously lost medieval volumes. This effort will cross a variety of boundaries, fostering active interdisciplinary cooperation across the humanities as well as collaboration between a multitude of international institutions, from major national collections to small local repositories. This breakout session will discuss Manuscriptlink’s goals and technical features, progress in developing the public site as the “go live” date approaches, projected for late-Spring 2014, and expectations for what Manuscriptlink might offer to the broader fields of Medieval Studies, Book History, and the Digital Humanities. Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) Spring 2014 Membership Meeting March 31 - April 1, 2014 St. Louis, Missouri http://www.cni.org/mm/spring-2014/

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                  • Apple and Quill Presents Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle, April 16, 2014

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                    from Digital Humanities Initiative / Added

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                    Apple & Quill, in collaboration with Hamilton's Music Department and Digital Humanities (DHi), present a performance and workshop by Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle. This video features Anna and Elizabeth discussing the history of the ballads that they love, and using theater to breathe life into the stories found in the music. The performance concludes with highlights from a special "crankie" making workshop. ANNA ROBERTS-GEVALT and ELIZABETH LAPRELLE are based in Southwest Virginia. They met, coming at traditional Appalachian music from different directions. Anna was in a touring old-time band. Elizabeth was singing ballads in far-away states. They came together to create a different kind of show: one that used theater and stories to show people what they love about old tunes and ballads. They also knew that keeping the music in the mountains--playing in their communities, playing for schools--was part of the job. With that, they set about making crankies, and learning stories, and trading songs and tunes. For more information, please see www.annaandelizabeth.com. Chapters: Been a Long Time Traveling: 1:15 Troubles: 3:02 Songs by Texas Gladden/Gladden Family The Weaver's Bonny (The Devil's Nine Questions, Riddles Wisely Expounded): 6:59 Old Kimball: 9:50 All the Pretty Little Horses (Whole Heap a Little Horses): 12:47 Songs by Addie Graham Wouldn't Mind Working from Sun to Sun: 15:52 The Greenwood Side (The Cruel Mother): 19:07 Schooldays Over- Ewan MacColl: 26:42 Coal Creek Ballad (title unknown)- George Gibson: 29:30 Remembrance of Lella Todd as told by Letha Sexton: 34:05 Callahan- Earl Thomas: 40:50 Jubilee (Swing and Turn Jubilee): 49:16

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                    • Apple & Quill Presents Book Arts at Burke with Andrew Rippeon January 29, 2014

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                      from Digital Humanities Initiative / Added

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                      Hamilton College's Burke Library presents Apple & Quill: Creative Arts at Burke, a creative arts series focusing on creative writing, music, and the visual arts. With support from Hamilton’s Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi) and Audiovisual Services, the series is recorded and archived for future teaching and research opportunities. The spring 2014 Apple & Quill series showcased Book Arts and featured presentations focused on the creative versatility of books as artistic objects. This event featured poet and scholar Andrew Rippeon discussing his work in Burke Library's special collections, and leading an exhibition on some of the notable volumes found therein. Former editor of the poetics journal P-Queue, and founder of the book series QUEUE, Dr. Andrew Rippeon is a poet, letterpress printer, and independent scholar researching twentieth and twenty-first century poetry and poetics. Chapters: Book Arts at Burke Lecture: 00:00 Second Floor Exhibit: 08:20 Third Floor Exhibit: 14:43 Rare Books Room: 28:42 Book Making Workshop Highlights: 34:01

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