1. A Roundtable on The History Manifesto: The Role of History and the Humanities in a Digital Age

    01:38:16

    from Heyman Center/Society of Fellows / Added

    163 Plays / / 0 Comments

    The History Manifesto is a call to arms to historians and everyone interested in the role of history in contemporary society. Leading historians David Armitage and Jo Guldi identify a recent shift back to longer-term narratives, following many decades of increasing specialization, which they argue is vital for the future of historical scholarship and how it is communicated. This provocative and thoughtful book makes an important intervention in the debate about the role of history and the humanities in a digital age.

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    • The Digital GC

      01:28:49

      from GC Videography Fellows / Added

      25 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Digital Praxis Seminar Project Launches DH Box | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=7m32s Travelogue | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=18m13s Beyond Citation | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=27m47s Provost's Digital Innovation Grants Writing Studies Tree | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=39m27s Mapping Mythology | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=45m16s Collaborative Tools for Reducing Violence and Criminal Sanctions | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=50m18s New Media Lab Documenting Cappadocia | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=56m07s Digital Fellowship Programs GC Digital Fellows | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=62m10s Program Social Media Fellows | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=69m00s Videography Fellows | https://vimeo.com/113208362#t=79m30s

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      • Alexis Lothian Digital Dialogue: From Transformative Works to #transformDH: Digital Humanities as (Critical) Fandom

        58:43

        from MITH in MD / Added

        Alexis Lothian, Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies University of Maryland College Park MITH Conference Room Tuesday, October 21, 2014 at 12:30 pm The identity of the field, network, discourse, or discipline of “Digital Humanities” is a source of endless discussion among its practitioners and critics – from conflicting genealogies of humanities computing and new media studies, to the gendered and raced institutional logics critiqued in the recent Differences issue on “The Dark Side of Digital Humanities.” This talk aims to chart an alternative path through the welter of definitional tangles by reinterpreting the world of digital humanities by taking seriously one of its more informal dimensions: the fervor with which digital humanist nerds and geeks appreciate their objects of study. I argue that digital humanities is a fandom – and that there is much to learn from attending to its processes and practices through the lenses developed both by fan studies scholars and by fans themselves. Participants in creative fan communities have theorized their own knowledge production as in conversation with, yet distinct from both media industrial and academic models; drawing from these approaches enables us to understand “digital humanities” as a phenomenon that need not be contained within the bounds of the academy. Drawing attention to the examples of the fannish nonprofit Organization for Transformative Works and the digital humanities network #transformDH, I will pay special attention to the theory and praxis of critical fandom: the ways in which members of fan communities use diverse creative techniques to challenge and critique the structures and representations around which their communities are organized. Understanding digital humanities as critical fandom makes it possible to focus on the affective dimensions that shape it and the contradictory logics that permeate its relationship to the disciplines and institutions that provide its context. Alexis Lothian is a interdisciplinary scholar of queer and feminist media and cultural studies with a focus on speculative fiction, digital media, and online fandom. She lives in the Washington, DC area and is a tenure track Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies at University of Maryland College Park, where she teaches in the LGBT Studies program and the undergraduate honors program in Design | Culture and Creativity. Lothian is presently developing a book manuscript based on her PhD dissertation, “Deviant Futures: Speculative Fiction and Queer Time,” while also working on what will become a second monograph on critical and social justice-oriented fan cultures and participating in collaborative work as part of the TransformDH collective. Read more on her research page. Lothian is also a participant in feminist science fiction and media fandom, with a specific interest in the ways fan communities engage in critical theorizing and activism (for example, through online discussion and fan video). She uses some of these forms in her own scholarly work, in addition to standard academic practices.

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        • Jon Oberlander - Mapping the Mad God's Dream: Text Mining, Literature, and the City

          52:06

          from Digital Repository of Ireland / Added

          27 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Public talk by Professor Jon Oberlander, held at the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, Ireland on October 30, 2014. Funded by an Irish Research Council grant. Event co-hosted by Insight @ DCU and the Digital Repository of Ireland.

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          • Designing Technology and Pedagogy to Promote 21st Century Literacies in the Humanities (w/CC Subtitles)

            01:36:39

            from Poetic Media Lab / Added

            118 Plays / / 1 Comment

            A talk by Brian Johnsrud (Stanford) and Emily Schneider (Stanford) at the Digital Humanities Focal Group. October 31, 2014 [USE "CC" Subtitles - **Please excuse occasional feedback from the wireless router in the room**] Abstract: "We've been told time and again: the information landscape is shifting, creating new ways of interacting with multimedia, sprawling archives, and digital, participatory cultures. These changes are (slowly) being echoed in the humanities classroom, as reading digitally, communicating online, and analyzing interactive, multimedia artifacts are being integrated into existing practices traditionally valued in the humanities. In this talk, Brian Johnsrud and Emily Schneider will share their research on how traditional humanistic practices can be enlivened and extended with new digital tools and objects of analysis. The key questions inherent to this research include: What kinds of "21 st century literacies" are required for productive engagement with new media and learning practices,both in and outside of classrooms? And how might courses in the humanities support students in developing these literacies? Lacuna Stories, a digital reading and writing platform currently being developed in the Poetic Media Lab, takes on this challengeby merging academic texts and media with the interactive affordances of the Web. This talk will give an overview of"21 st century literacies," discuss their connection to the overall learning goals of the humanities, and showcase several "old"and "new" literacies that Lacuna Stories is designed to support."

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            • Introducing "Richard Pryor's Peoria"

              04:36

              from Scott Saul / Added

              66 Plays / / 0 Comments

              This video is a teaser for the "Richard Pryor's Peoria" website, which curates over 200 documents—including never-before-seen family photos and records—related to Pryor's formative years in that Illinois city. The site will be released on December 1, 2014.

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              • Marisa Parham Digital Dialogue: "Without Innovation: African American Lifeworlds and the Internet of Things"

                01:04:46

                from MITH in MD / Added

                Marisa Parham, Associate Professor of English Amherst College MITH Conference Room Tuesday, October 14, 2014 at 12:30 pm This is the second talk in a series. (The first was a TEDx talk given at Amherst College in 2013). Each talk is a speculation on a set of questions about technology, embodiment, and temporality. How can we build a future when we have already had a past? How might we account for how unremembered pasts impact the good work we desire for the future? How do we think about future in a time when futures arrive more and more quickly? What happens to metaphor? To history? In this talk I take as my conceptual starting point Angela Davis’ reading of Frederick Douglass’ telling of his own movement into human freedom, a tale that ends with his assertion that “however long I might remain a slave in form, the day had passed forever when I could be a slave in fact.” I end with a consideration of what is at stake in recognizing emergent parallels between the historical lives of African Americans and how the industrialization of the Internet has enabled our growing desire to optimize every object as intelligent extension of a masterful self. In her mapping of the distance between form and fact, between an enslaved person’s legal status as an object and his or her reflexive humanity, Davis makes her reader aware of a vast and shifting network of power, the net effect of subject-object relations in a society itself structured by inequality. In the context of my talk, this is a way of thinking about how a person might be at the center of an innovation, while at the same time remaining on the outside of that innovation, not experiencing life as the proper and ratified subject of such transformation. This is also a place for thinking about how notions of core and periphery, which had in previous generations been associated with the flow of raw materials and finished goods, is continually reified in today’s exponentially technologized and informationalized world. What would it mean to juxtapose Davis’ and many others’ explications of such networks with contemporary interest in developing new kinds of subject-object relations, in this case the Internet of Things? More than just catchy phrasing, “Internet of Things” also hints at something important about what we already imagine the Internet to be. The Internet of Things and its contingent If This Then That (IFTTT) programming standard is designed to make the control of connected objects second nature to users, and to use automation to generate feelings of intimacy by allowing the responsiveness of objects to occur through mechanisms transparent to those users. What kinds of historical precedent do we have for this collapse of distance between the digital, psychic, and mechanical worlds? And how might this serve as case study for what the digital humanities can bring to other critical traditions? Marisa Parham directs the Five College Digital Humanities Initiative, and is also an associate professor of English at Amherst College. Her teaching and research focus on texts that problematize assumptions about time, space, and bodily materiality, particularly as such terms share a history of increasing complexity in texts produced by African Americans. Her current projects include books and articles on the posthuman, on Octavia Butler’s unpublished work, and on problems of hypertextuality and abstract equivalence in American literature, film, and music. She holds a PhD in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University, and is the author of Haunting and Displacement in African-American Literature and Culture, which you can learn more about at her website.

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                • The Classroom and Content in the digital age, a discussion at Mississippi State University, part 2

                  37:35

                  from University Press of Mississippi / Added

                  17 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  STARKVILLE, Mississippi --- (Part 2 of 2) Director Leila W. Salisbury, Editor-in-Chief Craig Gill, Editor Vijay Shah, and Marketing Director Steve Yates from University Press of Mississippi facilitate a discussion with scholars on the campus of Mississippi State University in the Charles H. Templeton, Sr. Music Museum in the Mississippi State University Library. Scholars on the panel are Mark D. Hersey, associate professor of History Lynn Holt, Professor of Philosophy, Interim Head, Classical and Modern Languages and Literature John F. Marszalek, Giles Distinguished Professor Emeritus Director; Mentor of Distinguished Scholars; Executive Director and Managing Editor, Ulysses S. Grant Association Nickoal Eichmann, Assistant Professor/History Research Librarian/Digital Humanist More about the museum resides at http://library.msstate.edu/templetonmuseum More about University Press of Mississippi resides at http://www.upress.state.ms.us/

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                  • The Classroom in the Digital Age: Content, Challenges, and Curriculum at Mississippi State University

                    39:16

                    from University Press of Mississippi / Added

                    10 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    STARKVILLE, Mississippi --- (Part 1 of 2) Director Leila W. Salisbury, Editor-in-Chief Craig Gill, Editor Vijay Shah, and Marketing Director Steve Yates from University Press of Mississippi facilitate a discussion with scholars on the campus of Mississippi State University in the Charles H. Templeton, Sr. Music Museum in the Mississippi State University Library. Scholars on the panel are Mark D. Hersey, associate professor of History Lynn Holt, Professor of Philosophy, Interim Head, Classical and Modern Languages and Literature John F. Marszalek, Giles Distinguished Professor Emeritus Director; Mentor of Distinguished Scholars; Executive Director and Managing Editor, Ulysses S. Grant Association Nickoal Eichmann, Assistant Professor/History Research Librarian/Digital Humanist More about the museum resides at http://library.msstate.edu/templetonmuseum More about University Press of Mississippi resides at http://www.upress.state.ms.us/

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                    • The Shelley-Godwin Archive: A Visualization of the Git Repository

                      04:10

                      from MITH in MD / Added

                      This is a visualization of the curation of TEI XML documents in the Shelley-Godwin Archive's sg-data Git repository https://github.com/umd-mith/sg-data. It highlights how a distributed group of scholars collaborated to create the TEI documents that make up the archive. It also demonstrates the activity that a version control system like Git records, and its application in a digital curation environment. The two green clusters of nodes that appear in the top left corner about 10 seconds after the video begins are the TEI XML documents. You should be able to make out different users who are making edits to them. The other portions of the visualization are Word documents and code related to the archive. The sg-data repository is where the Shelley-Godwin TEI XML documents were started. If you are looking for the current data it has since been moved to a new repository: https://github.com/umd-mith/sga/tree/master/data

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