1. 2014 Writing Colloquium, "Writing and the Nonviolent Life" with Fr. John Dear

    01:01:29

    from Earlham School of Religion / Added

    60 Plays / / 0 Comments

    What does it mean to live – and write – the nonviolent life? Drawing on his latest book, The Nonviolent Life, Fr. John Dear will reflect on his 35 years of teaching Gospel nonviolence, working for peace, and writing prophetically. With stories of writing in war zones and in jail cells, of blogging and meeting book deadlines, Dear will invite us to use writing as one tool in the Christian life of prophetic ministry and lead us in a short writing exercise to cultivate our vocation as Christian peacemakers. Nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Fr. Dear has proclaimed the Gospel of Jesus and the way of nonviolence for more that 30 years. He has led peace organizations, worked in homeless shelters, traveled in war zones and been arrested more than 75 times for acts of civil disobedience against war. As a writer, he has published more than 30 books, including Living Peace, Jesus the Rebel, The God of Peace, Peace Behind Bars, The Questions of Jesus, Lazarus Come Forth, A Persistent Peace, and his latest book, The Nonviolent Life.

    + More details
    • What a Quaker jihad Looks Like - George Lakey

      01:27:59

      from Earlham School of Religion / Added

      52 Plays / / 0 Comments

      George Lakey is a Quaker who is currently Visiting Professor at Swarthmore College. He has led 1,500 workshops on five continents and led activist projects on local, national, and international levels. Among many other books and articles, he is most recently author of “Strategizing for a Living Revolution” in David Solnit’s book Globalize Liberation (City Lights, 2004). His first arrest was for a civil rights sit-in and most recent was with Earth Quaker Action Team while protesting mountain top removal coal mining. George completed a training at the Earlham School of Religion with activist Quakers in Ohio Valley Yearly Meeting for a nonviolent action at PNC Bank branches throughout the Midwest on Dec. 6 because of PNC's funding of mountain top removal.

      + More details
      • Leadership Conference 2014: Serving through Leadership in the Manner of Friends - Ann Riggs

        01:06:35

        from Earlham School of Religion / Added

        16 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Using historical and contemporary Quaker resources, we will explore the tasks of a servant leader focusing on three areas: building empathic community with all the diverse stakeholders of an organization, grasping the wider and long-term implications of both actions and inactions, and leading from a base of experience. Using insights from John Woolman, we will look at building insightful connections with all involved as a central leadership task. Using nineteenth century leaders among Friends as role models for learning what Greenleaf calls leadership foresight, we will examine the long-term consequences and implications of taking institutional action or nottaking institutional action. Finally, looking at selected writings about the spiritual experiences of early Friends, we will consider how the substantive changes made recently at Friends Theological College in Kenya occurred by making small changes to the experiences people were having there. Bio: Ann Riggs has led Friends Theological College, Kaimosi, in Western Kenya from 2009 as Field Staff for Friends United Meeting. She is returning to the United States at the end of the 2013-14 academic year and joining the faculty of Loyola University of Chicago’s Institute of Pastoral Studies. She has served on the Christian and Interfaith Relations Committee of Friends General Conference for many years, was Director of the Faith and Order Commission and Associate General Secretary of the National Council of Churches USA 2002-2007and is currently a member of the Central Committee of the World Council of Churches.

        + More details
        • Leadership Conference 2014: Panel Discusson #2 - Servant Style Leadership with Organizations

          01:23:31

          from Earlham School of Religion / Added

          9 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Jeff Baxter: Jeffrey L. Baxter is President of Friends Fellowship Community, Inc. in Richmond, Indiana. Jeff has been with the Community since 1983 and has served as chief executive officer for twenty-four years. He received his B.A. from Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana. Jeff is a founding member and current Board Chairman of the Samaritan Alliance, LLC, a group purchasing organization serving senior living providers. He is active in, and past Chairman of, LeadingAge Indiana, an association of not-for-profit facilities and services for the elderly. He is currently President of the Richmond Hospital Authority and is a past Chair of the Board of Directors of the Reid Hospital Foundation. Jeff and his wife Melissa live in southern Wayne County. Miriam Bunner: Miriam Bunner, B.A., The Ohio State University, is the Assistant to the Dean of ESR. She has been a Quaker for the past 20 years. In the late 1990s, she discovered the Alternatives to Violence Project, but wasn’t able to train as a facilitator until 2009. At the completion of her training the lead facilitator retired, leaving no AVP leadership in the state. In 2012, with the aid of her daughter and a former facilitator, Miriam rebirthed AVP Indiana and became the AVP USA Midwest Regional Representative. Currently, she is conducting workshops at the Indianapolis Re-Entry Educational Facility. Miriam and her husband, Buck, have two sons, a daughter, and a daughter-in-law. Wanda Coffin Baker: Wanda Baker grew up at Salem Friends Church in Iowa Yearly Meeting. She graduated from William Penn College (now University) in Iowa, and received a M.Min. degree from Earlham School of Religion. She has volunteered at the Council House and Kickapoo Friends Centers in Oklahoma, was a youth missionary to East Africa Yearly meeting, and taught for two years at the Ramallah Friends Girls School in Palestine, in addition to pastoring for 23 years in Wilmington, Western, and New England Yearly Meetings. She and her husband Doug have 3 children, 2 daughters-in-law, and 2 grandchildren. Currently, Wanda serves as Superintendent of Western Yearly Meeting. Robin Mohr: Robin Mohr serves as Executive Secretary for the Friends World Committee in the Americas. She is also a writer, minister, wife, mother, and a member of Green Street Monthly Meeting in Philadelphia. She coined the term “convergent Friends” in late 2005 to describe a movement of the Holy Spirit among Friends across divides of theology, geography, and age and wrote about it on her blog,robinmsf.blogspot.com. Last year she led a series of Living Water workshops in Central America, connecting the story of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well with stories of Quaker women in history and our own stories of service to God.

          + More details
          • Panel Discussion #1 - The Spirit of Volunteerism

            01:21:57

            from Earlham School of Religion / Added

            17 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Stan Banker: Stan Banker is a graduate of Taylor University (1973) and Earlham School of Religion (1976). He has served as a Friends minister for 43 years including 21 years at Indianapolis First Friends Meeting. He also served as associate superintendent of Iowa Yearly Meeting and editor of Quaker Life magazine. Following the 2010 Haitian earthquake, Stan helped form Na Rive (www.narive.org) to provide educational opportunities for Haitian children living in the Dominican Republic. He also partnered to create a fair-trade coffee cooperative of 39 farmers in the Dominican Republic. Stan has led fourteen tours to Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic and Colombia. Kirsten Bunner: Kirsten Bunner, B.A., 2011, M.A.T., 2014, Earlham College, has been a Quaker most of her life. While at Earlham, Kirsten was involved in advocacy against sexual violence and conflict resolution at the Derry Peace and Reconciliation Center in Northern Ireland. Currently, she is a facilitator for the Alternatives to Violence Project in Indiana; is a volunteer with the Sierra Student Coalition of the Sierra Club; and works extensively with the fossil fuel reinvestment campaign, a coalition of over 300 college universities that call for college endowments to withdraw funds from fossil fuels and reinvest in local communities and renewable energy initiatives. Kirsten spends her spare time supporting initiatives that work towards peace and justice in the world. Peggy Hollingsworth: Peggy Ann Hollingsworth is a lifelong member of Russiaville, Indiana Friends Meeting. She continues to fulfill many roles there and in Western Yearly Meeting. Presently she is a WYM Trustee of Earlham College, as well as a member of the Earlham School of Religion Board of Advisors. She has served over four decades in leadership with the United Society of Friends Women International and the WYM USFW. An Indiana University graduate (BS in Education, MLS), Peggy's career was in school librarianship, including 34 years at Connersville HS. In retirement she continues to participate in several educational and religious organizations in all three of her "chosen" communities. Aaron Nell: Over the last ten years, Aaron Nell has worked as a mediator and youth advocate. Richmond has provided many opportunities for Aaron to employ known gifts and cultivate new ones through volunteering. Some of those roles have included facilitating non-violence workshops in prisons, accompanying adults with learning disabilities to Quaker meeting, serving as a mediator, and for most of the last year, hosting a poetry open mic at Roscoe's Coffee Bar and Taproom. Many of these opportunities took root by following invitations from passionate individuals wanting to expand the circle of service and advocacy they believed in.

            + More details
            • Servant Leadership: Spirituality Charged Change Agent - Alan Kolp

              01:03:45

              from Earlham School of Religion / Added

              24 Plays / / 0 Comments

              The calling of the effective twenty-first century leader is to be a change agent. Status quo and “business as usual” modes of leadership signal the death knell for any institution---profit or non-profit. Effective leaders generally will be innovative leaders. Servant-leadership, as a particular form of leadership, resonates with Quaker spirit, especially as Robert Greenleaf experienced and expressed it. The servant-leader is a spiritually charged change agent. As Quakers understand it, a servant-leader is a spiritual leader. Hence, leader is given a charism, along with the charge to lead change. As a spiritually charged change agent, the servant-leader is a transformational leader. A number of characteristics of the servant-leader can be noted that help in identifying, equipping and encouraging the development of Quaker leaders for the job of being twenty-first century change agents. Servant-leadership is moral leadership. It is leadership that is virtue-based, which is always foundational. The servant-leader enables the creation of a vision and crafts a strategy to facilitate the envisioned change and growth. Servant-leaders know how to marshal and exercise the power necessary to lead change. Servant-leaders have the requisite humility to share the success and the courage to shoulder shortcomings. Bio: Currently Alan holds the Baldwin Wallace University Chair in Faith & Life and is Professor of Religion. He also has been Pastoral Leader at First Friends Meeting, Richmond, IN and was Dean of ESR and Professor of Historical and Spiritual Studies. Alan teamed with business colleague, Peter Rea, to author two books. They also founded the Center for Innovation and Growth to inspire students to develop innovative skills and mindset. They work globally within the business community to develop innovative leaders who can lead change to make a better, peaceful world. Alan also writes a daily inspirational blog.

              + More details
              • Earlham Commencement May 10, 2014

                01:58:01

                from earlhamcollege / Added

                173 Plays / / 0 Comments

                John David Dawson, President, presides over the 2014 Earlham Commencement exercises held May 10, 2014 on Chase Stage on the Earlham College campus in Richmond, Indiana. Celebrate the accomplishments of the students from Earlham School of Religion, the Earlham Master of Arts in Teaching program and the graduates of Earlham College.

                + More details
                • 2014 Willson Lectures with Rita Nakashima Brock: Lecture 3 - Community Responsibility

                  55:42

                  from Earlham School of Religion / Added

                  24 Plays / / 1 Comment

                  The military uses a highly ritualized, intense, communitarian process to change a civilian into a warrior. What is the responsibility of the society to bring them all the way home? This lecture will discuss what we all can do to support recovery from moral injury after war.

                  + More details
                  • 2014 Willson Lectures with Rita Nakashima Brock: Lecture 2 - Soul Repair

                    01:00:38

                    from Earlham School of Religion / Added

                    38 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    After the moral anguish of war, the journey of recovery is a long process of telling the story of what happened and finding ways to rebuild a moral identity. This lecture will discuss some of the personal dimensions of recovery and the process required to change from a warrior trained to kill into a civilian again.

                    + More details
                    • 2014 Willson Lectures with Rita Nakashima Brock: Lecture 1 - Moral Injury after War

                      01:32:22

                      from Earlham School of Religion / Added

                      44 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      When a war is declared over, it returns home with those sent to fight it. Recently VA clinicians identified a wound of war that is neither physical nor Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), but a deep wound of the soul, which they called moral injury. This lecture will explain the distinction and the impact of war on moral conscience.

                      + More details

                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."