1. 2006 Spinach E. coli Outbreak Victim: Ashlee Mattson

    02:51

    from Marlerclark / Added

    In 2005, the Minnesota Department of Health began investigating an E. coli outbreak linked to bagged raw spinach. Health officials ultimately confirmed 30 cases including two cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a potential fatal complication of an E. coli infection a leading cause of acute kidney failure. One of those sickened was Ashlee Mattson, a 21-year old college student. While Ashlee's infection initially appeared routine to friends and family, blood tests showing kidney malfunctions made it immediately clear that her illness was quite severe. Ashlee's kidneys did fail and she spent nearly a month in the hospital, where it was often unclear if she would survive. Today, the damage done by the E. coli infection has made it highly likely that Ashlee will be a high risk pregnancy risk and will require a kidney transplant by age 50.

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    • Raw Milk Risks: Chris Martin E. coli & HUS Illness

      04:33

      from Marlerclark / Added

      Seven-year-old Chris Martin developed an E. coli O157:H7 infection in September 2006, after consuming unpasteurized (raw) milk. He was hospitalized beginning on September 8, suffering from severe gastrointestinal symptoms, including bloody diarrhea. Shortly thereafter, he developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). In an effort to properly treat his rapidly deteriorating condition, Chris was moved to multiple medical facilities, twice by life-flight. His HUS was remarkably severe, marked by prolonged renal failure, pancreatitis, and severe cardiac involvement. He required 18 days of renal replacement therapy. On two occasions his cardiac problems became so severe that he was placed on a ventilator. At several junctures, the possibility that he might not survive was very real. Ultimately he was hospitalized through November 2, after incurring over $550,000 in medical bills. Renal experts have opined that Chris is likely to develop severe renal complications in the future. These complications include end stage renal disease (ESRD) and kidney transplant.

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      • Colleen Kortendick: 2006 Spinach E. coli Outbreak Victim

        02:43

        from Marlerclark / Added

        In 2006, teenager College Kortendick developed an E. coli O157:H7 infection after consuming contaminated spinach. Her illness would ultimately lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a potentially deadly complication that resulted in kidney failure. Ms. Kortendick's illness was one of at least 205 E. coli O157:H7 infections linked to contaminated bagged spinach in 2006 Marler Clark represented 93 victims of the outbreak.

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        • Jack in the Box E. coli outbreak: Brianne Kiner

          03:29

          from Marlerclark / Added

          In 1993, Jack in the Box suffered a major foodborne illness outbreak involving E. coli 0157:H7 bacteria. Four children died of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) caused by the bacteria, hundreds were hospitalized, and 600 more were reported sick after eating undercooked ground beef patties contaminated with fecal material containing the E. coli 0157:H7 bacteria at locations in California, Washington, Idaho, and Nevada. This was the largest E. coli outbreak in American history up to that time. Brianne Kiner was one HUS survivor, her story is shown below. Her story demonstrates how something as small as a bacterial organism on the food we eat can have devastating effects and change the lives of both the victims of a foodborne illness and their families forever. William Marler represented Kiner in the Jack in the Box E. coli outbreak, recovering $15.6 million for the Kiner family.

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          • E. coli Victim: June Dunning

            03:10

            from Marlerclark / Added

            Right up until the time of her death, June Dunning remained an active, self-aware, and outgoing woman. Her health had always been good. For the last seven years of her life, she lived in Hagerstown, Maryland with her daughter and son-in-law. On August 28, 2006, June consumed a small amount of Dole baby spinach from a bag her daughter had purchased at the local grocery store days earlier. The source of part of that spinach was a small, organic farm in California that had sold its spinach, not to customers directly, not to a local restaurant, grocery store or farmer’s market, but to a broker for further processing. The bag of spinach later tested positive for a pathogenic strain of non-O157:H7 E. coli. E. coli Victim: June Dunning from Marlerclark on Vimeo. June fell ill on September 2, 2006. Her illness quickly progressed and she was taken to the hospital the following day. She was first seen by a triage nurse, who noted that June had experienced a sudden onset of diarrhea the night before, which had progressed to bloody stools and severe abdominal pain in the morning. June rated her pain at “9” on a 10 point scale. Further examination and blood tests revealed a number of disturbing problems. A CT scan showed diffuse thickening and swelling of the colon, with severe, acute inflammatory colitis of the ascending and transverse colon. Her blood pressure was elevated and she was beginning to show signs of renal insufficiency. Concerned about her worsening condition, her physician admitted her to the hospital and started her on intravenous fluids. Admission to the hospital did not slow the deterioration of June’s condition. She began to lose her mental faculties. She spoke, but her words did not make sense. She often spoke of going to see her husband, who has passed away ten years prior. All the while, she continued to suffer from frequent, painful bloody diarrhea. Her renal failure worsened. Her doctors were concerned that the colitis would soon lead to systemic toxemia, and thus determined that she needed surgical removal of a portion of her colon. June survived the surgery, but her overall health continued to deteriorate. She became anemic and was placed in the intensive care unit. She soon stopped producing urine, and progressed to a coma-like state. In the early morning hours of September 7, she suffered a grand mal seizure. On September 9, she suffered another seizure, followed by a drop in her oxygen levels. In reaction to her failing bodily functions, she was placed on mechanical ventilation. By this point in the hospitalization, her medical bills totaled nearly $50,000. From this point forward, it was painfully clear what the unfortunate outcome of June’s condition would be. An EEG on September 11 showed slowing brain activity. Her daughter and son-in-law stayed with her for the final hours. Late in the evening on September 11, the ventilator and all medical support except for morphine were disconnected. The doctors said they expected June to pass within the hour. Instead, she persevered without life-support. For the majority of the next 36 hours, she appeared to be resting comfortably. In one frightening episode during the early hours of September 12, however, she experienced one final seizure. She gripped her daughter’s hand, eyes wide open, moaning and sighing. Thankfully, the seizure passed. June clung to life until just after dawn on September 13, passing away at 6:45 AM.

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            • Betty Howard: Victim of 2006 Spinach E. coli OUtbreak

              03:02

              from Marlerclark / Added

              Betty Howard of Richland, Wash., was hospitalized on September 7, 2006 with an E. coli infection. She would never return home. In the hospital doctors learned that Betty had developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) a leading cause of acute kidney failure. Betty struggled with various complications linked to her illness over the next five months, until she finally passed away on January 26, 2007. Betty contracted E. coli when she ate a sandwich with contaminated spinach.

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              • E. coli Victim: Abby Fenstermaker

                03:20

                from Marlerclark / Added

                The gut wrenching story Abby Fenstermaker's E. coli illness and death is pure tragedy. In 2009 7-year-old Abby died from complications associated with her E. coli illness. Abby contracted E. coli after giving her grandfather a kiss. Her grandfather had contracted an E. coli infection after consuming contaminated beef.

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                • Erickson Family E. coli Illnesses - 2006 Spinach E. coli Outbreak

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                  from Marlerclark / Added

                  In 2006, three members of the Erickson family became ill with E. coli O157:H7 infections. However, none were made as ill as 4-year-old Regan, who also developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). After 4 longs weeks spent in the hospital combating his illness, Regan's discharge diagnosis included the following as a result of his E. coli infection: HUS; pancreatitis; acute renal failure requiring peritoneal dialysis; placement of PICC; placement of peritoneal dialysis catheter; anemia requiring blood transfusions and ongoing Darbopoetin infusion; emesis requiring Prevacid and Erythromycin Ethylsuccinate (anti-infective); hyperphosphatemia requiring calcium carbonate with meals and phosphate restriction; hypocalcemia status post calcium supplements between meals and IV Calcium chloride x 2; and reactive airway disease

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                  • Donna Roy 2006 Spinach E. coli Outbreak Victim

                    02:36

                    from Marlerclark / Added

                    Donna Roy was part of the 2006 Dole Spinach E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak. She developed Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), which is a severe, life-threatening complication of an E. coli O157:H7 bacterial infection. It is now recognized as the most common cause of acute kidney failure in childhood in the United States. E. coli O157:H7 is responsible for over 90% of the cases of HUS that develop in North America

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                    • Open Air Germ Warfare Experiments On Civilian Populations

                      06:21

                      from TheRedPillGuide / Added

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                      Germ Warfare, E-Coli, Bio- Warfare, Navy If you wish to get additional reliable news and key information please visit: http://theredpillguide.wordpress.com/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------­-- Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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