1. 54 Citarum River—An Integrated Approach to Water Resources Management

    11:40

    from ADB: Reflections and Beyond Added 18 0 0

    The Citarum River Basin Territory supports a population of 28 million people, delivers 20% of Indonesia’s gross domestic product, and provides 80% of the surface water supply to Indonesia’s capital city, Jakarta. Over the past 20 years, rapid urbanization and industrial growth have resulted in growing quantities of untreated domestic sewage, solid waste, and industrial effluents being dumped in the Citarum. ADB's Integrated Citarum Water Resource Management Investment Project aims to address challenges to water conservation and allocation. Its components cover watershed management, agriculture, water supply, and energy.

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    • 3a Water in Asia

      02:18

      from ADB: Reflections and Beyond Added 4 0 0

      Water is a most precious resource. In Asia and the Pacific, it is threatened by economic growth, misuse, and pollution. The demand for water is huge and many countries face a water crisis. This video places an accent on how water impacts lives.

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      • Paul Johnson: Looking into the long-term

        08:48

        from The King's Fund Added 5 0 0

        Paul Johnson, Director, Institute of Fiscal Studies, gives a background to economic growth in the UK and discusses what future NHS spending could look like.

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        • 29 Evolution of the Energy Sector in ADB

          06:06

          from ADB: Reflections and Beyond Added 11 0 0

          ADB's energy policy of 2009 aligns its energy operations to meet energy security needs, facilitate a transition to a low-carbon economy, and achieve ADB's vision of a region free of poverty. The policy prioritizes energy-related objectives and identify the institutional capabilities needed for the future within a changing regional, global, and technological context. This video recounts changing perspectives on and approaches to energy over the last 30 years.

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          • USAID Pakistan Mission Director Gregory Gottlieb Interview at PTV World program "Analyzed" on March 21, 2014.

            42:27

            from USAID Pakistan Added 113 0 0

            USAID Pakistan Mission Director Gregory Gottlieb Interview at PTV World program "Analyzed" on March 21, 2014.

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            • RSA Shorts - Growth is Not Enough

              03:26

              from The RSA Added 219 13 0

              Our politicians are hung up on keeping the growth curve rising. But does GDP really tell us all we need to know about a country's wealth and well-being? In this new RSA Short, Kate Raworth makes a powerful argument to look beyond economic growth alone for a true measure of prosperity and progress. Kate Raworth is a renegade economist teaching at Oxford University, and is focused on the rewriting of economics to make it a fit tool for addressing the 21st century's social and ecological challenges. She blogs on Doughnut Economics at http://www.kateraworth.com and tweets @KateRaworth Credits: Voice: Kate Raworth Animation: Marija Jacimovic Design: Milan Perisic Production: Benoit Detall Watch Kate Raworth in full: https://vimeo.com/56749650 Find out more about the RSA: http://www.thersa.org Follow the RSA on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thersaorg Like the RSA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thersaorg

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              • RSA Shorts - Growth is Not Enough

                03:26

                from Ant House Studio Added 2,481 25 0

                Based on Kate Roworth's talk "Doughnut Economics" we made this RSA Short. For the full version of the talk (17 min) which I highly recommend visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqJL-cM8gb4

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                • UK Economic Recovery in Sight | Thanks to the UK Prime Minister

                  00:12

                  from Cristal Advertising Added 2 0 0

                  UK Economic Recovery in Sight | Thanks to the UK Prime Minister

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                  • B-ROLL: SOMALIA INTERNET SERVICES

                    22:30

                    from AMISOM Public Information Added 976 0 0

                    STORY: INTERNET USAGE THRIVES IN SOMALIA TRT: 22:30 SOURCE: AU/UN IST RESTRICTIONS: This media asset is free for editorial broadcast, print, online and radio use. It is not to be sold on and is restricted for other purposes. All enquiries to news@auunist.org CREDIT REQUIRED: AU/UN IST LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/SOMALI/NATS DATELINE: 14/JANUARY/2014 MOGADISHU, SOMALIA STORY: Billboards advertising Internet services dot the thoroughfares in Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu. Businesses, schools, non-governmental organizations and public institutions are increasingly reliant on the Internet and this hasn’t boded too well with the insurgent group, al Shabaab. Last week, the group issued a statement banning the use of mobile Internet services and gave service providers a 15-day ultimatum to disconnect the service. The Somali Federal Government was quick to assuage the fears of telecom companies and customers, urging them to ignore the threat and carry on. Al Shabaab, known for its trademark sweeping statements has promised to enforce the ban once the deadline expires but this doesn’t seem to faze a lot of Somalis. Liban Ahmed, who runs an Internet café that also doubles as a travel agency, says the lives of many Somalis and businesses now thrive on the Internet. Though the ban does not affect the Internet cafés, Ahmed says Internet usage is now part and parcel of the Somali lifestyle. “The Internet is especially beneficial to the whole city and particularly for businesses. For us, in our work as a travel agency, we rely on the Internet one hundred percent. Our customers are not only those living in this area; they live all over the world. Some live in the US and in the UK as well. We book their ticket online and we send it to them via email. So this service is made possible by the Internet connection,” he says. With Hormuud Telecom and Nationlink as the main service providers, Internet usage has become integral in the daily lives of many Somalis, making it difficult for them to comprehend life without it. Deeq Ahmed Shire, a resident of Mogadishu and a mobile Internet user says he enjoys daily connection to the rest of the world and needs the Internet. “We cannot do without Internet. It is very convenient and we have become used to it and it is what keeps us busy. We talk to our friends and we converse with the world. We are able to be in touch everywhere. So it is very beneficial for us. So companies like Hormuud have made access to this service easier,” Such a move is aimed at instilling fear in the public sphere, analysts say, adding that Al Shabaab is getting increasingly paranoid; afraid that the Internet could be used to track them in their hideouts Abdi Aynte, the Executive Director of the Heritage Institute of Policy Studies (HIPS), a Somali think tank organization says the ban is not easily enforceable and explains some of the possible motives behind this action. “I think there are three reasons Shabaab did this; number one is, it is part of their broader strategy to instill fear in the minds of the people. Number two, I think they are afraid to be exposed because mobile technology with high speed internet will allow citizens to transmit data into the rest of the world through social media or through the internet and what not, and the third and perhaps the most important one is that they are afraid that this technology will be used to track some of their top fighters as the operations of drones permeate in the areas that al Shabaab controls in South and Central Somalia,” Al Shabaab’s ban extends to fiber optic technology. The fiber optic cable, touched shore in Somalia last year as part of the East African Submarine System. Once operational, this is expected to revitalize Internet access and usage as the country witnesses significant growth in the telecommunications sector. As the deadline to the enforcement of the ban looms closer, it’s a wait and see approach for most Somalis. In the meantime, they’ll live their lives online thanks to the Internet.

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                    • INTERNET SERVICES IN SOMALIA

                      02:51

                      from AMISOM Public Information Added 5,283 0 0

                      STORY: INTERNET USAGE THRIVES IN SOMALIA TRT: 2:51 SOURCE: AU/UN IST RESTRICTIONS: This media asset is free for editorial broadcast, print, online and radio use. It is not to be sold on and is restricted for other purposes. All enquiries to news@auunist.org CREDIT REQUIRED: AU/UN IST LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/SOMALI/NATS DATELINE: 14/JANUARY/2014 MOGADISHU, SOMALIA STORY: Billboards advertising Internet services dot the thoroughfares in Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu. Businesses, schools, non-governmental organizations and public institutions are increasingly reliant on the Internet and this hasn’t boded too well with the insurgent group, al Shabaab. Last week, the group issued a statement banning the use of mobile Internet services and gave service providers a 15-day ultimatum to disconnect the service. The Somali Federal Government was quick to assuage the fears of telecom companies and customers, urging them to ignore the threat and carry on. Al Shabaab, known for its trademark sweeping statements has promised to enforce the ban once the deadline expires but this doesn’t seem to faze a lot of Somalis. Liban Ahmed, who runs an Internet café that also doubles as a travel agency, says the lives of many Somalis and businesses now thrive on the Internet. Though the ban does not affect the Internet cafés, Ahmed says Internet usage is now part and parcel of the Somali lifestyle. “The Internet is especially beneficial to the whole city and particularly for businesses. For us, in our work as a travel agency, we rely on the Internet one hundred percent. Our customers are not only those living in this area; they live all over the world. Some live in the US and in the UK as well. We book their ticket online and we send it to them via email. So this service is made possible by the Internet connection,” he says. With Hormuud Telecom and Nationlink as the main service providers, Internet usage has become integral in the daily lives of many Somalis, making it difficult for them to comprehend life without it. Deeq Ahmed Shire, a resident of Mogadishu and a mobile Internet user says he enjoys daily connection to the rest of the world and needs the Internet. “We cannot do without Internet. It is very convenient and we have become used to it and it is what keeps us busy. We talk to our friends and we converse with the world. We are able to be in touch everywhere. So it is very beneficial for us. So companies like Hormuud have made access to this service easier,” Such a move is aimed at instilling fear in the public sphere, analysts say, adding that Al Shabaab is getting increasingly paranoid; afraid that the Internet could be used to track them in their hideouts Abdi Aynte, the Executive Director of the Heritage Institute of Policy Studies (HIPS), a Somali think tank organization says the ban is not easily enforceable and explains some of the possible motives behind this action. “I think there are three reasons Shabaab did this; number one is, it is part of their broader strategy to instill fear in the minds of the people. Number two, I think they are afraid to be exposed because mobile technology with high speed internet will allow citizens to transmit data into the rest of the world through social media or through the internet and what not, and the third and perhaps the most important one is that they are afraid that this technology will be used to track some of their top fighters as the operations of drones permeate in the areas that al Shabaab controls in South and Central Somalia,” Al Shabaab’s ban extends to fiber optic technology. The fiber optic cable, touched shore in Somalia last year as part of the East African Submarine System. Once operational, this is expected to revitalize Internet access and usage as the country witnesses significant growth in the telecommunications sector. As the deadline to the enforcement of the ban looms closer, it’s a wait and see approach for most Somalis. In the meantime, they’ll live their lives online thanks to the Internet.

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