1. Denby Energy Commercial Audit Training Information

    01:13

    from Denby Energy / Added

    382 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Denby Energy is your #1 Source for Energy Auditor training. We offer self paced energy auditor training that can help you start a new green career. Our energy performance classes are the best in the industry and the only program certified by the USGBC education council. You can get started today by downloading a free guide on how to become an energy auditor.

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    • The Green Jobs Red Herring

      02:34

      from Solar One / Added

      Jason Scott from EKO Asset Management Partners decries the green jobs debate as a red herring and explains why moving to an energy-efficient economy is a given. Clip from "No Money No Problems? Financing Cleantech in the Post-ARRA Era" on January 31, 2012.

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      • 2009 DOE National Energy and Career Expo

        06:05

        from U.S. Department of Energy / Added

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        Excerpts from the November 2009 DOE National Energy and Career Expo highlights exciting research and career opportunities at the Department of Energy and its National Laboratories.

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        • Cutting Energy Costs, Clean Energy Jobs and Mushroom Packaging – 04.10.2011

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          from Energy NOW / Added

          67 Plays / / 0 Comments

          p { margin-bottom: 0.08in; } CUTTING ENERGY COSTS: Experts say our own homes could be the country's biggest source of energy savings. Correspondent Lee Patrick Sullivan looks at how one couple is looking at new ways to save on their home energy consumption and costs, and how researchers are working to help all homes become more energy efficient. HOT ZONE: THE PASSIVE HOUSE: Some home scan be designed to save energy. This one, in the Washington, DC, suburbs is so well sealed and insulated that is requires no expensive heating or cooling equipment. It uses building techniques to keep the air inside comfortable year round. The energy costs are reduced by 90 percent by using triple glazed windows and rigid foam insulation, and making sure there are no leaks in window seams. The windows are also designed to mak maximum use of sunlight and shade for heating and cooling. THE MIX: ENERGY JOBS: Anchor Thalia Assuras sits down for a debate on the future of green jobs with former Govs. Jennifer Granholm (D-MI) and Bob Ehrlich (R-MD). Granholm was an outspoken advocate for Michigan's green economy while governor, and recently joined the Pew Charitable Trusts as an advisor on clean energy policy. Ehrlich served on the House Energy and Commerce Committee while a member of Congress, and kept unemployment in Maryland .5% or more below the national average while in office. PACKAGING: A MUSHROOMING BUSINESS: Americans take plastic packaging material in everyday products for granted - but a burgeoning company based in central New York state doesn't. Special Correspondent Josh Zepps looks at how Ecovative Design is looking to replace materials made from polystyrene and other synthetics with environmentally friendly packaging made from mushrooms and agricultural byproducts.

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          • The Gulf Spill: One Year Later - 4.17.2011

            30:00

            from Energy NOW / Added

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            THE SPILL'S ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT: LOUISIANA OYSTERMEN: Oysters were once a prime harvest from the Gulf of Mexico. Before the 2010 oil spill, 67 percent of the oysters Americans ate were grown and harvested there. But the oil and efforts to contain it shut down much of the region's seafood production, and many Louisiana oyster beds were killed by fresh water diverted from the Mississippi River to push oil away from shore. INTERVIEW WITH HARRY SHEARER: Shearer, the voice of several characters on The Simpsons is an environmental advocate, "investigative satirist," and part-time resident of New Orleans. He recently directed a documentary about Hurricane Katrina as a manmade disaster, titled "The Big Uneasy." He discusses how the Gulf region is recovering from the spill and how he believes the government and industry should renew their focus on drilling safety. THE SPILL'S ECONOMIC IMPACT: STAYING IN BUSINESS: The 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the ensuing drilling moratorium dealt a blow to the oil industry, but they've been devastating to family businesses that supply the industry. No drilling means no business at all, forcing people from their jobs and families to make heartbreaking decisions. Correspondent Lee Patrick Sullivan visits Thomas and Melissa Clements, owners of a machine shop that has practically ground to a halt since drilling stopped. When will it pick up again? And will they be around to see that day? INTERVIEW WITH SEN. DAVID VITTER: Vitter (R-LA) has been a vocal proponent of expanded offshore oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico and a lifting of the drilling moratorium imposed last year. He recently co-authored an energy plan that contrasts with President Obama's energy blueprint, by calling for expanded domestic coal and oil production. Vitter also shares his favorite renewable energy source. REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK: REFLECTIONS ON THE OIL SPILL: One year later, the environmental effects of the Gulf Oil Spill are still unclear. Mother Jones reporter Kate Sheppard talks about how the Deepwater Horizon affected the Gulf region's residents and environment. The Hill reporter Andrew Restuccia discusses how Congress has failed to respond. THE SPILL'S INDUSTRY IMPACT:CONTAINING THE OIL: Last year, the nation watched and waited for months during many failed attempts to cap the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Now, with the well capped and killed, the industry has responded with new response plans and equipment designed to keep future oil spills from getting out of control. Anchor Thalia Assuras looks at one of these new sub-sea containment systems, the Helix Rapid Response.

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            • The Gulf Spill: One Year Later - 4.17.2011

              30:00

              from Energy NOW / Added

              54 Plays / / 0 Comments

              THE SPILL'S ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT: LOUISIANA OYSTERMEN: Oysters were once a prime harvest from the Gulf of Mexico. Before the 2010 oil spill, 67 percent of the oysters Americans ate were grown and harvested there. But the oil and efforts to contain it shut down much of the region's seafood production, and many Louisiana oyster beds were killed by fresh water diverted from the Mississippi River to push oil away from shore. INTERVIEW WITH HARRY SHEARER: Shearer, the voice of several characters on The Simpsons is an environmental advocate, "investigative satirist," and part-time resident of New Orleans. He recently directed a documentary about Hurricane Katrina as a manmade disaster, titled "The Big Uneasy." He discusses how the Gulf region is recovering from the spill and how he believes the government and industry should renew their focus on drilling safety. THE SPILL'S ECONOMIC IMPACT: STAYING IN BUSINESS: The 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the ensuing drilling moratorium dealt a blow to the oil industry, but they've been devastating to family businesses that supply the industry. No drilling means no business at all, forcing people from their jobs and families to make heartbreaking decisions. Correspondent Lee Patrick Sullivan visits Thomas and Melissa Clements, owners of a machine shop that has practically ground to a halt since drilling stopped. When will it pick up again? And will they be around to see that day? INTERVIEW WITH SEN. DAVID VITTER: Vitter (R-LA) has been a vocal proponent of expanded offshore oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico and a lifting of the drilling moratorium imposed last year. He recently co-authored an energy plan that contrasts with President Obama's energy blueprint, by calling for expanded domestic coal and oil production. Vitter also shares his favorite renewable energy source. REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK: REFLECTIONS ON THE OIL SPILL: One year later, the environmental effects of the Gulf Oil Spill are still unclear. Mother Jones reporter Kate Sheppard talks about how the Deepwater Horizon affected the Gulf region's residents and environment. The Hill reporter Andrew Restuccia discusses how Congress has failed to respond. THE SPILL'S INDUSTRY IMPACT:CONTAINING THE OIL: Last year, the nation watched and waited for months during many failed attempts to cap the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Now, with the well capped and killed, the industry has responded with new response plans and equipment designed to keep future oil spills from getting out of control. Anchor Thalia Assuras looks at one of these new sub-sea containment systems, the Helix Rapid Response.

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              • Subsea jobs - Oil & Gas, Renewables, Power & Nuclear Energy jobs

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                from gigdeals / Added

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                http://www.energyjobline.com/vacancie... Energy Jobline acts a global gateway to the latest oil jobs, renewable jobs and power and nuclear careers worldwide. Energy Jobline delivers the latest news, reviews and information on the greatest energy jobs worldwide. At Energy Jobline we have widest reach of energy jobs within the industry.

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                • Preview: Mix: Energy Jobs

                  01:43

                  from Energy NOW / Added

                  11 Plays / / 1 Comment

                  Anchor Thalia Assuras sits down for a debate on the future of green jobs with former Govs. Jennifer Granholm (D-MI) and Bob Ehrlich (R-MD). Granholm was an outspoken advocate for Michigan's green economy while governor, and recently joined the Pew Charitable Trusts as an advisor on clean energy policy. Ehrlich served on the House Energy and Commerce Committee while a member of Congress, and kept unemployment in Maryland .5% or more below the national average while in office.

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                  • Rogers Calls for 'G2' Solution to Energy, Climate Issues

                    03:14

                    from Energy NOW / Added

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                    Duke Energy CEO Jim Rogers says the solution for the challenges of reducing carbon emissions and generating affordable power lie in energy partnerships between the United States and China. Rogers tells Executive Editor Margaret Ryan how he believes that can happen and how both countries can benefit. Rogers says the most important thing for most Americans and U.S. political leaders to realize is that a partnership with China will result in jobs in the United States, no matter whether the materials used in those projects come from the U.S., China or somewhere else. He says about 70 percent of the jobs created for any given project are going to be located at the project site. Rogers also says Americans and political leaders must realize that in the power generation sector, the U.S. and China have different interests. U.S. utilities have to retire and replace their entire fleets of generators by 2050, replacing a third the coal generation by 2020. China, meanwhile, has to build out a huge amount of infrastructure to bring electric power to all its citizens. About 80 percent of what's generated there now goes to industry. Rogers believes that as the two largest consumers of electricity and carbon dioxide emitters, the United States and China need to work together to meet those challenges. He says a partnership involving both governments and companies from both nations would ultimately help both sides. He says that while the Obama administration is signaling that it is ready to work with the Chinese, supporters of such a plan need to build political support in this country.

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                    • Intelligence Squared Debate

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                      from Energy NOW / Added

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                      energyNOW! hosted a discussion on the future of clean energy in America's economy. The discussion was held after guests watched live broadcast of Intelligence Squared's debate on the same question. Chief correspondent Tyler Suiters moderated the discussion between Constellation Energy's Jim Connaughton and the Center for American Progress' Dan Weiss. The two discussed what comprises clean energy, what might be included in a clean energy standard and what policies need to be implemented to make clean energy reliable and affordable. They also talked about how to secure federal funding for investment in the clean energy sector. The panel also took questions from the audience, including how markets can drive innovation, rather than public investment, how Chinese regulations and policies affect the decision-making process here, and the role of emissions-cutting technology.

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