1. ESOcast 40: When Speed Matters - Discovery of the Accelerating Universe Wins 2011 Nobel Prize for Physics

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    In the past two decades, astronomers have made a truly revolutionary discovery: that the cosmos is not only expanding, but is doing so at an ever-faster rate. The discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics. More episodes of the ESOcast are also available here: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/archive/category/esocast/

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    • ESOcast 37: Full-size Mock-up of World's Largest Telescope Mirror Built at ESO's Open House Day

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      On Saturday 15 October 2011 ESO opened the doors of its headquarters in Garching bei München, Germany, to the public. Throughout the day, thousands of visitors had the chance to help build a full-size mock-up mirror of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) -- the largest planned telescope in the world -- and to experience many other aspects of ESO's work. Credits and download options are available on: http://eso.org/public/videos/esocast37a/

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      • E-ELT Compilation 2012

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        Credit: ESO More information and download-options: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/eso1225c/

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        • ESOcast 25: Chasing Gamma Ray Bursts at Top Speed: The VLT’s Rapid Response Mode

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          This video podcast explains the ESO Very Large Telescope’s Rapid Response Mode, which makes it possible to observe gamma-ray bursts only a few minutes after they are first spotted. As the optical afterglow of a gamma-ray burst fades extremely rapidly, observations must start as quickly as possible. And the Very Large Telescope has the capability to master this time critical issue better than any other telescope. More information and download options are available on: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/eso1049a/

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          • ESOcast 23: A telescope's wire to the world

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            In this episode of the ESOcast, we travel to the inhospitable but dramatic landscape of the Atacama Desert. Beneath the ground there, a new high-speed data cable is helping connect Paranal, the world’s most advanced astronomical observatory, with scientists and engineers based at ESO headquarters in Germany. Dr J presents this new project and explains its impact on scientific research at ESO. Credits, more information and download options are available on: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/eso1043a/

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            • Comparing APEX and ALMA views of star-forming galaxies in the early Universe

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              A team of astronomers has used ALMA (the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) to pinpoint the locations of over 100 of the most fertile star-forming galaxies in the early Universe. The best map so far of these distant dusty galaxies was made using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), but the observations were not sharp enough to unambiguously identify these galaxies in images at other wavelengths. ALMA needed just two minutes per galaxy to pinpoint each one within a comparatively tiny region 200 times smaller than the broad APEX blobs, and with three times the sensitivity. This video zooms in on some of the galaxies. The large red blobs are the earlier APEX observations and the much sharper views are from ALMA. Whereas the APEX images were not sharp enough to identify the emitting galaxies unambiguously the much sharper ALMA images can pin down the emitting galaxies much more precisely. The ALMA and APEX observations, at submillimetre wavelengths, are overlaid on an infrared view of the region as seen by the IRAC camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope (coloured blue). More information and download-options: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/eso1318b/ Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO), J. Hodge et al., A. Weiss et al., NASA Spitzer Science Center

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              • Zooming in on the radio galaxy Centaurus A, as seen by ALMA

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                This zoom sequence starts with a broad view of the Milky Way, and zooms in to a visible-light view of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The final view shows a combination of ALMA and near-infrared observations. The new ALMA observations, shown in a range of green, yellow and orange colours, reveal the position and motion of the clouds of gas in the galaxy. They are the sharpest and most sensitive such observations ever made. Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO); ESO; Y. Beletsky; Nick Risinger (skysurvey.org). Music: Disasterpeace (http://disasterpeace.com/) More information and download-options: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/eso1222a/

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                • Zooming into the star cluster NGC 6520 and the dark cloud Barnard 86

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                  This video sequence starts with a view of the spectacular Milky Way. As we zoom in towards the centre we see a huge cloud of faint stars, this is the Large Sagittarius Star Cloud. On top of this cloud there is a much smaller dark feature called Barnard 86 and in the final view from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile we see not only the gecko-shaped dark cloud but also its neighbouring star cluster NGC 6520. More information and download-options: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/eso1307a/ Credit: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2/Nick Risinger (skysurvey.org). Music: movetwo

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                  • ESOcast 60: A Polarised View of Exoplanets

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                    Astronomers know that planets around other stars beyond the Solar System are common. But these planets are very hard to see and even harder to study. Fortunately, there is a clever trick that helps to separate the feeble glow of a planet from the dazzling glare of its parent star: exploiting the polarisation of the light reflected from the planet. More information and download options: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/esocast60a/ Credit: ESO Visual design and editing: Martin Kornmesser and Luis Calçada. Editing: Herbert Zodet. Web and technical support: Mathias André and Raquel Yumi Shida. Written by: Georgia Bladon, Richard Hook, Nicola Guttridge, Christoph Keller, Frans Snik, Daphne Stam and Herbert Zodet. Music: Toomas Erm. Footage and photos: ESO, Jean-Luc Beuzit/Eric Stadler/IPAG Grenoble, Luis Calçada, Martin Kornmesser, ESA/Hubble, José Francisco Salgado (josefrancisco.org), Nick Risinger (skysurvey.org). Directed by: Herbert Zodet. Executive producer: Lars Lindberg Christensen.

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                    • Zooming in on star-forming galaxies in the early Universe seen with ALMA

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                      This video sequence starts with a broad view of the sky, including the famous constellation of Orion (The Hunter). We gradually close in on an unremarkable patch of sky called the Chandra Deep Field South that has been studied by many telescopes on the ground and in space. A team of astronomers has used ALMA (the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) to pinpoint the locations of over 100 of the most fertile star-forming galaxies in the early Universe in this part of the sky. The best map so far of these distant dusty galaxies was made using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), but the observations were not sharp enough to unambiguously identify these galaxies in images at other wavelengths. ALMA needed just two minutes per galaxy to pinpoint each one within a comparatively tiny region 200 times smaller than the broad APEX blobs, and with three times the sensitivity. At the end of this sequence the fuzzy APEX detections of the galaxies appear first, followed by the much sharper ALMA images that pin down the emitting galaxies much more precisely. The ALMA and APEX observations, at submillimetre wavelengths, are overlaid on an infrared view of the region as seen by the IRAC camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope (coloured blue). More information and downlaod-options: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/eso1318a/ Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO), J. Hodge et al., A. Weiss et al., NASA Spitzer Science Center, Digitized Sky Survey 2, and A. Fujii.

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