1. A7s Frame Rate Test

    07:19

    from Mark Thomas / Added

    27 Plays / / 2 Comments

    Clip1 24p Clip2 30p Clip3 60p Clip4 120p

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    • Premiere Pro CC Export help

      04:00

      from Dell / Added

      4 Plays / / 0 Comments

      How to change the format to Quicktime, the codec or compression to H.264 and the frame rate. Also how to see what it will look like in the export by utilising the output tab.

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      • A7s Frame Rate Test 24p

        03:00

        from Mark Thomas / Added

        19 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Transfered at 24p

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        • W15 Music Video Speed:Sync Demo

          04:04

          from UOregon Cinema Studies Program / Added

          111 Plays / / 0 Comments

          This year's speed and lip sync exercise from CINE 425: Making Music Video. This is an exercise to learn how to achieve lip sync at various frame rates to give you the slow motion lip sync and the fast motion lip sync (similar to the 1990s Hype Williams videos with Busta Rhymes and Missy Elliot). This videos features several students and the instructor, me (Andre´ Sirois) as the "talent," performing a short big from Whitney Houston's "I Will Always Love You." Please note that if the lips are off, well, it's because the instructor didn't practice much (note that for slow motion, you have to get your talent on board to perform the song super fast and to practice). Some of the students here are: David Chiang, Max Anderson, Max Rudolph, Jonas Parker, Brennan Duffy, Cassidy Garcia, and Scythe Klein. Ashlee Olsen and Brad Burke on camera, directed by Max Rudolph, and Juan Davalos on playback. Numerous students helped with lighting. Pretty fun class for sure. This year we added using a white backdrop. This was okay, but we didn't have enough light to really blow it out so it took some work in color correction (mainly blowing out the highlights and bringing down the mids/shadows, as well as some desaturation and color balance). For Slow motion: The challenge is to be able to shoot a video at a higher framerate (60fps, 1/125 shutter to maintain 180 degree shutter rule) and then conform to a 24p timeline in post, which means performing the song at +250% (to figure out how much you need to change the song speed you divide your shooting framerate by your timeline frame rate and then shift the decimal over two numbers; thus 60/24=2.5, so 250%). When you conform the framerate it slows down the footage 40% and you should have perfect sync. You also need to add frame blending so that the slow motion doesn't skip frames. I want to note that if your timeline is 30p, it's not quite as tough. It's a challenge, though, to perform a song at +250%, and some genres are easier than others (for instance, rapping at +250% is tough). Thus, the greatest challenge is getting your talent on board to do this. This will give you a similar aesthetic to the Coldplay "The Scientist" video (although this was also shot in reverse, so Chris Martin had the learn the lyrics at +250% and backwards): youtube.com/watch?v=RB-RcX5DS5A&feature=kp Shooting for fast motion is much easier. In this video we shot at 24fps, 1/50 and our timeline was 24p. The song was performed at 50%, so there is a lot more room to embellish (which I probably did too much of). When you get into post just speed the video up by +200% and you should be in sync, and what you get is this Hype Williams-esqu bugged out style like in this Busta Rhymes "Gimme Some More" video: youtube.com/watch?v=eHHT7dTmw8U&feature=kp Take this course to learn more production tips and tricks for music video! Remember, it's up to the talent to practice the song at these speeds to sell it.

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          • Framerate

            01:08

            from kinotto / Added

            0 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Keine #Kinotto Produktion im eigentlichen Sinne, zeigt wir hier kurz den Unterschied zwischen den einzelnen Bildwiederholraten/Framerates. Gezeigt wird stets die gleiche Sequenz, allerdings mit einer jeweils anderen Rate. Das Ergebnis? Sehen Sie selbst.

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            • The History of Frame Rate for Film

              15:21

              from FilmmakerIQ.com / Added

              4,500 Plays / / 18 Comments

              Explore the history of the frame rate - the engine that gives motion to the motion picture from their earliest versions in silent pictures to the frame rates of broadcast television. This lesson is proudly sponsored by RØDE Microphones: http://rodemic.com/

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              • Image Tearing

                06:09

                from Steve Smith / Added

                1 Play / / 0 Comments

                Steve Smith talks screen tearing of game play images, the causes and solutions. Show Notes for this Episode https://tqaweekly.com/se5ep19 Follow Steve Smith (Zed Axis) on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/zedaxis1981 Twitter : http://www.twitter.com/zedaxis Google+ : https://plus.google.com/+SteveSmith1981 To interact with the show, subscribe to our weekly newsletter, and acquire unique custom gear and apparel, head over to http://tqaweekly.com/ Subscribe to the Weekly TQA Podcast on iTunes 720P Video - http://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/technology-questions-answered/id556426538 MP4 Video - http://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/technology-questions-answered/id405826320 MP3 Audio - http://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/technology-questions-answered/id393776403 For more subscription methods, go to http://tqaweekly.com/subscribe

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                • Trivariate Function Graphic - Bike Ride

                  00:17

                  from Alexander Lorimer / Added

                  13 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  A machine learning algorithm has been used to develop an extremely complex trivariate mathematical function, modeled on 14 frames (spaced 1 second apart) taken from the video 'Cycling Safety Tips: Cyclists Visibility' by the Cycling Promotion Fund. The three input variables of the trivariate function are the x, y and t pixel co-ordinates of the 14 frames (with t representing time). The outputs of this function are the three RGB values of the respective pixel. Once the machine learning algorithm has created this continuous mathematical model of the sequence of images, it is possible to feed to trivariate function t co-ordinates that were not defined in the original sequence. The outputs of the function then act as interesting interpolations and extrapolations between and beyond the original frames. Here this technique has been used to increase the original 14 frames to 520 frames in total. More info here, http://www.aodlorimer.com

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                  • Trivariate Function Graphic - Aurora

                    00:20

                    from Alexander Lorimer / Added

                    15 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    A machine learning algorithm has been used to develop an extremely complex trivariate mathematical function, modeled on 15 frames (spaced 1 second apart) taken from the video 'Aurora borealis timelapse - polar reflections autumn 2013' by the Antti Pietikäinen. The three input variables of the trivariate function are the x, y and t pixel co-ordinates of the 15 frames (with t representing time). The outputs of this function are the three RGB values of the respective pixel. Once the machine learning algorithm has created this continuous mathematical model of the sequence of images, it is possible to feed to trivariate function t co-ordinates that were not defined in the original sequence. The outputs of the function then act as interesting interpolations and extrapolations between and beyond the original frames. Here this technique has been used to increase the original 15 frames to 600 frames in total. More info here, http://www.aodlorimer.com

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                    • Trûlah

                      00:11

                      from peter / Added

                      12 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Trûlah iPhone 6 Plus 240fps test

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                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."

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