1. Take Away Show #97 _ Patrick Watson (full version)

    30:56

    from Vincent Moon / Petites Planètes Added 25.9K 164 18

    Filmed by Vincent Moon Edited by Lucas Archambault & Vincent Moon Sounds by Francois Clos Produced by La Blogotheque Shot from Pigalle to Bonne Nouvelle, Paris, may 2008 http://www.blogotheque.net/Patrick-Watson,4821 http://www.patrickwatson.net/

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    • The Stone Bench | Saul Williams in Paris Catacombs

      29:11

      from La Blogotheque Added 59.4K 734 37

      Saul Williams came to us. He wanted to be filmed in Paris Catacombs. Not the official, clean ones. He wanted to go in the dirty, tough, cold and humid network of underground corridors. He thought we might be crazy enough to accept the challenge. We were crazy enough. Directed by Colin Solal Cardo Sound and Mix by François Clos Edit by Julie Salon and Colin Solal Cardo Production Management by François Clos Best Boy : Jonathan André Catacomb Guides : Arnaud Martens & Thibault Lefranc Produced by Chryde & Matthieu Buchsenschutz for la Blogotheque www.blogotheque.net http://www.saulwilliams.com/

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      • Josh T. Pearson | Sweetheart I Ain't Your Christ | Thou Art Loose | A Take Away Show

        21:34

        from La Blogotheque Added 21.3K 147 9

        La Blogotheque presents Josh T. Pearson | Sweetheart I Ain't Your Christ | Thou Art Loose | A Take Away Show "Il avait une barbe gigantesque, les airs d'un vieux sage. Quand il chantait, il bougeait à peine, les lèvres, les doigts. Sa tristesse était infinie, sa musique belle à pleurer, elle ne s'est jamais arrêtée. Suivez les complaintes sans fin de Josh T. Pearson, dans les rues d'un Belleville en mouvement." Read the full story (in French, English) http://www.blogotheque.net/Josh-T-Pearson,5872 Image & Edit by Colin Solal Cardo Sound & Mix by François Clos Produced by Chryde for Blogothèque http://www.joshtpearson.co.uk http://www.blogotheque.net

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        • POCKET PARTY #03 _ PATRICK WATSON

          17:37

          from Vincent Moon / Petites Planètes Added 2,735 48 6

          a web film by vincent moon produced by chryde and benoit toulemonde for la blogotheque and stances Shot in Bonne Nouvelle, Paris, june 2008

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          • La Blogotheque - Take Away Shows

            16:24

            from La Blogotheque Added 23K 410 11

            3 episodes of La Blogotheque's Take Away Shows submitted to the Vimeo Awards.

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            • MEXICO 2/11 | The Plastics Revolution | Saturno - Light Of Day - Money Talks | A Take Away Show

              15:34

              from La Blogotheque Added 10.4K 84 1

              La Blogotheque presents with the help of the CNC and Black XS The Plastics Revolutions | Saturno - Light Of Day - Money Talks A Mexican Take Away Show | part 2/11 Image & edit by Art Perez Jr. Sound & mix by François Clos Production management by François Clos & Laure Lefevre Text by Julien Courbe Produced by Chryde for la Blogotheque www.blogotheque.net www.myspace.com/theplasticsrevolution

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              • Esmerine | Sprouts | Nohna's Lullaby | A Take Away Show

                14:05

                from La Blogotheque Added 8,816 84 1

                La Blogotheque presents Esmerine | Sprouts | Nohna's Lullaby | A Take Away Show "Le détail. Les détails. La profusion des détails. Plus je tente d’avoir une image globale de cette rencontre avec Esmerine, et plus je me rappelle des détails. Petit je pouvais rêver des heures en pensant aux nouvelles briques de lego que j’allais pouvoir assembler, une fois ouverts les cadeaux de Noël." Read the full story : http://blogotheque.net/2012/02/03/esmerine/ Image & Edit by David Ctiborsky Sound & Mix by François Clos Produced by François Clos for La Blogotheque http://www.esmerine.com http://www.blogotheque.net

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                • Seasick Steve - A Take Away Show - Part 2

                  13:17

                  from La Blogotheque Added 41.5K 140 6

                  An old man wearing a vest, who spent his whole life travelling, penniless, comes back to Paris to play his Blues. His name's Seasick Steve, he recorded an album, and he's got plenty of wonderful stories in the pockets of his dungarees. Part 2 of the movie, don't miss part 1 ! Full article is here : http://www.blogotheque.net/Seasick-Steve,4553 (French version : http://www.blogotheque.net/Seasick-Steve) blogotheque.net / seasicksteve.com Produced by La Blogotheque / Directed by Vincent Moon / Edited by Lucas Archambault / Sound by Gaspar Claus / Mix by François Clos

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                  • Aloe Blacc | A Take Away Show - Part 2

                    13:12

                    from La Blogotheque Added 54.1K 491 20

                    Aloe Blacc / A Take Away Show / Part 2 "You Make Me Smile", "Use Me" (Bill Withers) Directed by Colin Solal Cardo Sound by JB Aubonnet & François Clos Mix by François Clos Produced by Chryde Musicians ----------- The Grand Scheme: Joel Van Dijk / Guitar Joe Gonzales / Bass Te' Amir Sweeney / Percussions (Drums) Farmer Greif / Claps (Keys) Randal Fisher / Saxophone Read the story blogotheque.net/Aloe-Blacc,5671 (FR) blogotheque.net/Aloe-Blacc,5683 (EN) http://www.stonesthrow.com/aloeblacc http://www.blogotheque.net http://www.takeawayshows.com http://www.colinsolalcardo.com

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                    • Take Away Show #95.5: MAN MAN

                      13:04

                      from Vincent Moon / Petites Planètes Added 8,444 70 7

                      images and edit by vincent moon sounds by benoit furic mix by francois clos produced by la blogotheque shot in Paris, oberkampf, belleville, june 2008 13 minutes With Man Man, there was a “before” and an “after”, a Side A and a Side B of their Take Away Show. Side A was all smoothness, nonchalance, and little bits of happiness spread under a dim sun. Side B was the exact counterpoint. In Antoine’s apartment, when Man Man decided they were going to play “Van Helsim Boombox”, Side A was coming to an end. “Boombox” is that wobbly, wonky ballad that twists my spine every time I hear it. Its honky-tonk rhythm and melancholic melody support Ryan’s voice, scratched to the bone. We left these beautiful melodies behind in the apartment. The band knows how to twist and change these sweet songs into something darker, more vicious. Without knowing it, we hurtled towards a conclusion that was far beyond our hopes. The shift from Side A to Side B took place when the first part gave way to a telluric blast: a flood of decibels, of cries and metallic percussion, right in the heart of Paris. The Parisian pavement was literally vibrating and the walls transmitted the clamor up to the highest roofs of the street. It was tribal and invigorating. Man Man is not the first to theorize a flood of sound as a type of musical sharing experience. Volcano (among others) had already shown it to us. But the wild dudes of Philly pushed the jamming impulse way beyond, with the enthusiastic help of kids who were wandering in the neighborhood. What the camera didn’t record is the onlookers who gathered little by little, the neighbors who came to their windows, and us, happy and laughing because of what was happening. Mere minutes before, though, I had been a little disappointed with this Take Away Show. Of course, there had been the moment where Sergeï got his hair cut while the rest of the band sang “Everyone Says I Love You” by the Marx Brothers. They clearly understood the concept of this project well, and they suggested that we film in that salon. A few weeks before, in Brussels, Man Man told me about a cover they were working on. Tom Waits? Britney Spears? No, “something better”. It wouldn’t disappoint. The Marx Brothers: seemingly so far from Man Man’s musical sphere. But in fact— whether they were on the terrace of a café, in Antoine’s bedroom, on St. Maur street, or trying to negotiate the price of a Tuareg bracelet—Man Man was always funny and delightfully odd. Toys, voices, getups: the band could easily make a record for kids. Tim Burton and Bill Plympton would surely be its godfathers. As we were walking with them, I remembered the debt I owe to music storage media like CDs. If Man Man had appeared on my computer as a MP3 file, none of this would have happened. When I ordered their first record four years ago—at the impetus of only one track that was as intriguing as it was twisted—I would have never imagined the enthusiastic relationship I currently have with their music. The album spent some time on a shelf after a first (and not very convincing) listen. Then, one day, I put the record in my player, out of curiosity. It was a shock: I discovered their record. It was absolutely astounding. Without the CD, it would have been, Delete —> Empty Recycle Bin. On the way back, the saxophone, driven into a corner, triggered everything. Everyone started to bang on trash cans and fences, making noise with every single object they could find. Black Mission Goggles’s poum tchak kept going until Belleville Boulevard, among neighborhood kids. We never had to ask these kids to join— they understood immediately. It was music as it comes, alive and freed from all constraints. A few hours later, the finale of a terrific show was transformed into a risk-taking moment. The distance with the audience had been given a pounding. This was yet another piece of evidence that this band is big, very big. text by furax http://www.blogotheque.net/Man-Man,4324

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