1. Medical Physics Ethics in Action

    01:50:56

    from AAPM / Added

    52 Plays / / 0 Comments

    2012 AAPM Annual Meeting For more information about the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, visit http://www.aapm.org/ R Fahrig1*, G Frey2*, P Halvorsen3*, W Hendee4*, N Ozturk5*, J Prisciandaro6, C Serago7, G Starkschall8*, (1) Stanford University, Stanford, CA, (2) Medical Univ of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, (3) Alliance Imaging/Alliance Oncology, Newton, MA, (4) ,Rochester, MN, (5) The University of Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, (6) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, (7) Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, (8) UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, HOUSTON, TX WE-A-217BCD-1 Wednesday 8:00:00 AM - 9:55:00 AM Room: 217BCD In 2009, the AAPM formally adapted a Code of Ethics for its’ members based on the recommendations of Task Group 109. The intention of the code is to provide a set of ethical principles to members and affiliates to help guide them to behave in an ethically professional manner with respect to patients, colleagues and the general public. Although the principles are not law, it is expected that as professionals, we would honor and respect them. However, even the best intentioned may find themselves at one time or another in a moral gray zone, and feel that these principles or their application to a specific scenario may be open for interpretation. During this two hour panel session, medical physics experts in the area of education, ethics, professionalism, and research will discuss ethical scenarios and their interpretation of the TG 109 report with respect to these scenarios. The panel will be moderated by the chair of the Ethics Committee, Chris Serago. Several of the scenarios will be based on anonymized responses from the survey on Ethics and Professionalism in Medical Physics circulated by the AAPM to its members in February 2012. Learning Objectives: 1. Discuss the meaning of ethics and professionalism. 2. Review AAPM Code of Ethics. 3. Discuss ethical scenarios and interpretations of AAPM Code of Ethics with respect to these scenarios.

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    • SPECT: Physics Principles and Equipment Design

      01:04:04

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      2012 AAPM Summer School Eric C. Frey, PhD, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD For more information about the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, visit http://www.aapm.org/

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      • SPECT: New Technologies & Applications, Including Oncology

        53:50

        from AAPM / Added

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        2012 AAPM Summer School Eric C. Frey, PhD, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD For more information about the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, visit http://www.aapm.org/

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        • Update On the Activities of the American Board of Radiology

          52:16

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          2011 ACMP G Donald Frey, Ph.D, MUSC, Charleston, SC, United States For more information about the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, visit http://www.aapm.org/

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          • La_Mision_Maldita

            44:34

            from Enemy Force / Added

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            En un inhospito lugar, algunos miembros del clan eForce se han visto forzados a responder con las armas a la invasión de un extraño virus que afecta a jugadores pertenecientes a ciertos clanes españoles. En esta aventura de acción, MadMax es el puño, Nena Guerrera la estrategia, Termita la agilidad ninja, y Sixx, el apoyo que a todos une a la par que narra todos los acontecimientos, cámara en mano. Film en primera persona, donde se aluden a antiguos clanes y a actuales miembros que no pudieron asistir al rodaje, no es solo una aventura de acción ni un motivo en el que unos amigos echaron unas risas. Tambien muestra que los clanes formados para jugar en línea, no necesitan siempre internet para pasar un rato digno de recordar.

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            • June 11, 2012 Mixer Webinar

              42:03

              from Greg Frey / Added

              68 Plays / / 0 Comments

              REPLAY of our Advocare Mixer Webinar. Hear 5 compelling stories of how the 24 Day Challenge has changed many lives physically

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              • 3 Way Call Training Feb 2012 Advocare

                37:09

                from Greg Frey / Added

                224 Plays / / 0 Comments

                3 Way Call Training for our Advocare TEAM

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                • Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

                  35:30

                  from AAPM / Added

                  22 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  2011 Joint AAPM/COMP Meeting Dr. Eric C. Frey, PhD, Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD, 21287-0859, United States For more information about the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, visit http://www.aapm.org/ Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is becoming an increasingly important tool for therapy of some cancers including non-Hodgkins lymphoma, thyroid cancer, and neuroendocrine tumors. The dose delivered to neoplasms and normal tissues, and thus the therapeutic response and incidence of toxicities, depends on the anatomy and physiology of the patient. Therefore, optimal treatment planning requires estimating the dose distribution for each patient. The dose distribution is estimated in two steps: measurement of the activity distribution of a planning dose at a series of time points using nuclear medicine imaging methods and calculating the dose to organs or voxels in the patient. State of the art dose estimation requires, as an input, estimates of the 3D activity distribution of the planning dose in the patient at each time point. The 3D activity distribution of a radionuclide can be estimatedusing the tomographic nuclear medicine imaging modalities SPECT and PET. Since uptake times of TRT agents are typically on the order of several days, radionuclides such as In-111 or I-131 (for SPECT) or I-124 or Y-86 (for PET) having longer half-lives are used for treatment planning. The SPECT radionuclides emit medium or high-energy photons, which can make quantification of the SPECT images more difficult and requires compensating for the collimator-detector response. The PET radionuclides have prompt gamma emissions that can result in false coincidences, once again complicating quantification. For both modalitiesattenuation and scatter compensation are essential. Compensation for partial volume effects is important for dose-estimation in small objects such as tumors. This lecture will review the challenges and recent advances in methods for quantifying 3D activity distributions from SPECT and PET imaging using radionuclides relevant for TRT. It will describe the impact of these advances in terms of metrics relevant to dose estimation and describe the levels of accuracy and precision that are obtainable with state-of-the-art methods. Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the applications and requirements of quantitative SPECT and PET for targeted radionuclide therapy. 2. Understand the factors that limit the quantitative reliability of SPECT images and how to compensate for them. 3. Understand the factors that limit the quantitative reliability of PET.

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                  • Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

                    35:30

                    from AAPM / Added

                    44 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    2011 Joint AAPM/COMP Meeting Dr. Eric C. Frey, PhD, Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD, 21287-0859, United States For more information about the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, visit http://www.aapm.org/ Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is becoming an increasingly important tool for therapy of some cancers including non-Hodgkins lymphoma, thyroid cancer, and neuroendocrine tumors. The dose delivered to neoplasms and normal tissues, and thus the therapeutic response and incidence of toxicities, depends on the anatomy and physiology of the patient. Therefore, optimal treatment planning requires estimating the dose distribution for each patient. The dose distribution is estimated in two steps: measurement of the activity distribution of a planning dose at a series of time points using nuclear medicine imaging methods and calculating the dose to organs or voxels in the patient. State of the art dose estimation requires, as an input, estimates of the 3D activity distribution of the planning dose in the patient at each time point. The 3D activity distribution of a radionuclide can be estimatedusing the tomographic nuclear medicine imaging modalities SPECT and PET. Since uptake times of TRT agents are typically on the order of several days, radionuclides such as In-111 or I-131 (for SPECT) or I-124 or Y-86 (for PET) having longer half-lives are used for treatment planning. The SPECT radionuclides emit medium or high-energy photons, which can make quantification of the SPECT images more difficult and requires compensating for the collimator-detector response. The PET radionuclides have prompt gamma emissions that can result in false coincidences, once again complicating quantification. For both modalitiesattenuation and scatter compensation are essential. Compensation for partial volume effects is important for dose-estimation in small objects such as tumors. This lecture will review the challenges and recent advances in methods for quantifying 3D activity distributions from SPECT and PET imaging using radionuclides relevant for TRT. It will describe the impact of these advances in terms of metrics relevant to dose estimation and describe the levels of accuracy and precision that are obtainable with state-of-the-art methods. Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the applications and requirements of quantitative SPECT and PET for targeted radionuclide therapy. 2. Understand the factors that limit the quantitative reliability of SPECT images and how to compensate for them. 3. Understand the factors that limit the quantitative reliability of PET

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                    • The Monarch Butterfly in Western North America - Digital West Video Productions and Multimedia

                      33:39

                      from John Frey / Added

                      Digital West Video Productions and Multimedia, http://www.digitalwestvideo.com/, produced this video for Cal Poly State University San Luis Obispo back in 2001. Working around these beautiful creatures up and down the California coastline was a real treat. Recording them in their over-wintering sites during their migratory phase was truly a special assignment!

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