1. Blaspheme the Holy Spirit (Matthew 12) John MacArthur

    02:01

    from John MacArthur Added

    http://www.macarthurcommentaries.com/ Few passages of Scripture have been more misinterpreted and misunderstood than these two verses. Because of their extreme seriousness and finality; it is critical to understand them correctly. Jesus first stated that any sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven men. Although blasphemy is a form of sin, in this passage and context the two are treated separately-with blasphemy representing the most extreme form of sin. Sin here represents the full gamut of immoral and ungodly thoughts and actions, whereas blasphemy represents conscious denouncing and rejection of God. Blasphemy is defiant irreverence, the uniquely terrible sin of intentionally and openly speaking evil against holy God or defaming or mocking Him (cf. Mark. 2:7). The Old Testament penalty for such blasphemy was death by stoning (Lev. 24:16). In the last days blasphemy will be an outstanding characteristic of those who rebelliously and insolently oppose God (Rev. 13:5–6; 16:9; 17:3). . . .

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    • God's Plan Demands Christ's Return, Part 2 (Selected Scriptures) John MacArthur

      46:37

      from John MacArthur Added

      http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/42-255 Would you open your Bible, please, to Luke 21...Luke 21. We are in a series called, "Signs of Christ's Return...Signs of Christ's Return." We're looking at the twenty-first chapter of Luke in which our Lord Himself gives a message on His return to His disciples. You will remember that it is on Wednesday of Passion Week, just two days before His crucifixion, that He sits on the western slope of the Mount of Olives with His disciples and tells them about His Second Coming. It's a critical message because everything is about to look like it ends very badly...very, very badly. From a worldly perspective, the life of Jesus looks like a total disaster. He is executed like a common criminal on that Friday in front of the watching world in Israel. He dies in the most ignominious way possible, nailed, to hang naked in the sun. It can't go more wrong than that. But that is not the end of the story by any means...by any means. On the third day after His crucifixion, He will rise from the dead. He will then ascend into heaven forty days later and in the future He will come again. What the world saw on that hillside on a Friday outside Jerusalem is not by any means the last vision of Jesus Christ. And so, on the brink of the darkest hour in the life of His followers, He gives to them the brightest hope. The core of this sermon which is recorded by Mark in Mark 13, recorded by Luke in Luke 21, and in full extent recorded by Matthew in Matthew 24 and 25. The heart of it is found in verses 25 to 28. Let's jump ahead, we'll get to this text in detail in a few weeks, but let's read it so we understand that this is the highpoint, this is the theme of what He is saying. And there will be in the future signs in sun and moon and stars and upon the earth dismay among nations in perplexity at the roaring of the sea and the waves, men fainting from fear and the expectation of the things which are coming upon the world for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. And then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. But when these things begin to take place, straighten up and lift up your heads because your redemption is drawing near. The Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. He goes quietly like a criminal, shamed, scorned, despised, rejected, crucified. He comes back in blazing supernatural glory. The disciples need to know that. We need to know that. And so on that Wednesday night, Jesus sits them down and tells them that He will return....

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      • Enoch Walked with God (Selected Scriptures) John MacArthur

        56:35

        from John MacArthur Added

        http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/80-387 Tonight we're going to begin a series on what we'll called "Twelve Unlikely Heroes." It was a couple of years ago that I thought it might be interesting to do a book, since people love character studies, they enjoy The Twelve Ordinary Men, The Twelve Extraordinary Women, so why not take a look at some other of the amazing biographies of the Bible under the kind of the title of Extraordinary...or rather Unlikely Heroes. This book will be available by the end of summer. It's finished and it's on its way and you'll be able to take a look at it at the end of summer. You will thoroughly enjoy it. It is...it is a rich and wonderful study. So, I'm going to kind of go along the pathway of those Twelve Unlikely Heroes, and they follow a flow scripturally. So we're going to start in the Old Testament with Enoch and Joseph and then we're going to work our way through all the main eras of biblical history on in to the New Testament, we're going to have a great time doing so....

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        • Pilate Before Jesus (Mark 15:1-15) John MacArthur

          01:11:45

          from John MacArthur Added

          http://www.gty.org/Resources/Sermons/41-79 Let's open the Word of God to the fifteenth chapter of Mark's gospel...the fifteenth chapter as John said, the end is in sight. Chapter 16 looking right ahead of you, perhaps in your Bible on the same page, although this is somewhat of a long chapter. We come to the opening fifteen verses of Mark and in this particular portion of Scripture, we meet this fascinating character by the name of Pilate...Pilate. He is a name to add to the rogues gallery that we've been accumulating in the drama of the murder of Jesus. Names like Judas, and Annas, and Caiaphas, and Herod, and now the Roman Governor by the name of Pilate, fascinating lineup of infamous, evil characters in the unparalleled drama that unfolds around the crucifixion of Christ. They are all part of the black backdrop set behind the shining glory of the Lord Jesus. All of them tried to use their position and their power and their influence and their wits to bring Jesus to His end. Humanly speaking, they are the co-conspirators who finally accomplished the execution of Jesus. However, divinely speaking God is the true power and God is the true influence who brings His own Son to the cross. God in reality is the true executioner. He is the one who was pleased to kill His Son as a substitutionary sacrifice for our sins. The Apostle Peter will give testimony to this in his great sermon on the Day of Pentecost as recorded in Acts 2 verses 22 and 23 where he says, "You crucified Him, but by the determined counsel and foreknowledge of God." That will be repeated again in the fourth chapter of Acts in a similar apostolic sermon, verses 27 to 28, where while there is human responsibility, God is the one who is accomplishing in the death of Christ His will and His saving purpose. The irony is that Judas from the viewpoint of man bears an immense amount of responsibility for the betrayal of Jesus. He renders, in a sense, the initial death sentence. Annas follows up with his own death sentence. Caiaphas follows with his. Herod plays a role. And Pilate passes final sentence. But the truth of the matter is, none of them were the cause of the judgment on Jesus Christ. Rather Jesus judged them. Judas thought he rendered a verdict on Christ, but the reality is, man by himself is priced for 30 pieces, Judas sold himself, not Christ. Annas and Caiaphas thought they sat in judgment on Jesus, as did Herod. But the truth of the matter is, He is their judge. And now we see Pilate and I have titled the sermon purposely not Jesus before Pilate, as if Pilate is the judge, but Pilate before Jesus, because in truth, Jesus is the judge....

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          • The Pastor as a Parent (1 Thessalonians 2:7-12) John MacArthur

            45:46

            from John MacArthur Added

            http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/80-404 This morning I've always kind of felt that the Sunday after the Shepherds' Conference is an opportunity for me to sort of come down a little bit and maybe just talk to the issue of the heart of the shepherd. We talked about the issues. We talked about the theology. But what about the heart? What about the heart of the man who shepherds the flock of God? You know, it might seem that just the analogy of a shepherd would give you some indication of it, that you're caring for sheep, sheep are dirty, sheep wander, sheep are stupid, and so forth and so on. So there's...you don't want to carry that analogy too far, obviously. But, I mean, there are some things that we learn about the whole role of shepherding and pastoral ministry from the concept of being a shepherd. But I want to address something that's, I think, more important in one sense, more intimate than that, and more clear as to the attitude you bring to ministry than even that. I want to talk to you about the pastor as a parent--the pastor as a mother, the pastor as a father. To do that, I want to draw you to 1 Thessalonians chapter 2, 1 Thessalonians chapter 2. We're going to look at verse 7 and following. Let me read it to you. We'll read down to verse 12....

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            • The Scandal of Grace, Part 1 (Mark 2:13-17) John MacArthur

              28:30

              from John MacArthur Added

              http://www.gty.org/Resources/Sermons/41-9 Well you can open your Bible to Mark chapter 2 as we continue our study of this wonderful account of the life of our Lord Jesus Christ. Mark chapter 2, we're going to be looking at verses 13 to 17, but we're not going to get there for just a minute. I want to set it up a little bit in your thinking. One of the things we always like to do is to think biblically, to get back into the context of Scripture and sometimes that's a bit of a transition. Sometimes trying to get us out of this world, the way this world thinks and the way things exist in perspective in this world may be very different from the ancient world. And sometimes we can make the contrast to help us back into biblical mind set. Let me approach that this way. Let's imagine for the sake of illustration that the Lord Jesus, the Son of God, the Savior, the Messiah had come into the world in our time, to our country in the year 2009. He had come for the reason that He came then, to be a sacrifice for sin. If indeed He had come at this time in this place, to die, He would have been killed for the opposite reason that He was killed in first century Israel...the very opposite reason. Then and there in first century Israel, He was rejected, He was despised, He was hated and He was murdered. And the reason? He was not religious enough. That was the reason. By standards of the Jewish religious leaders, predominantly the Pharisees, He was not holy enough...if holy at all. He was not righteous enough, if righteous at all. He was not demanding enough, He was not legalistic enough, He was not condemning enough. He was not tolerable...intolerant enough. He was not judgmental enough. He was not separatistic enough. He was sub-par to a dominantly religious world view....

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              • The Astonishing Servant of Jehovah (Isaiah 53) John MacArthur

                01:07:52

                from John MacArthur Added

                http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/90-435 Now for this morning, I finally want you to open your Bible to the fifty-third chapter of Isaiah, Isaiah chapter 53, and we are about to embark on a study of this immensely important portion of the Old Testament as we begin our series in the Old Testament, finding Christ there. The reality this morning is, folks, I give you sort of fair warning. The reality is you’re going to think you’re in an upper division class in the Master’s Seminary because it is essential to me to give you the ground work and the foundation and something of the structure of this section of Holy Scripture. You need to understand its character, its context so that you can be able to draw all the richness that is in this chapter. I have heard sermons on Isaiah 53 but you’re going to get more than that, you’re going to get a series that could last as long as a couple of months. And in order to make that all that it should be and for you to be able to see what is really in this incredible section of Scripture, I’m going to have to give you an introductory message this morning. And so you need to put on your scholastic cap and think carefully and thoughtfully about this, expect to be on overload a little bit. We’re going to test your gigabyte capacity this morning, how much you can handle. But we’re going to lay this one down on CD, if you will, or on MP3 file for the future, it will be the kind of thing you’ll probably want to go back to and listen and absorb in the future....

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                • The Sin unto Death (1 John 5)

                  02:00

                  from John MacArthur Added

                  http://www.macarthurcommentaries.com This is the confidence which we have before Him, that, if we ask anything according to His will, He hears us. And if we know that He hears us in whatever we ask, we know that we have the requests which we have asked from Him. If anyone sees his brother committing a sin not leading to death, he shall ask and God will for him give life to those who commit sin not leading to death. There is a sin leading to death; I do not say that he should make request for this. All unrighteousness is sin, and there is a sin not leading to death. (1 John 5:14--17) At first glance, verse 16 appears to introduce an abrupt change of subject. But upon further consideration, the connection of verses 16 and 17 to verses 14 and 15 becomes clear. By giving one important exception, John illustrates in a contrasting manner the extent of God's promise to answer prayer. When a believer sees a brother (a real or professing believer) committing a sin not leading to death, the apostle writes, he shall ask and God will for him give life to those who commit sin not leading to death. On the other hand, there is a sin leading to death, and the apostle did not advise Christians to make request for this sin. Evidently John and his readers knew what the sin leading to death was, since no explanation is given, but its exact meaning is difficult for us to determine. Two possibilities present themselves. First, the sin in question may be that of a non-Christian leading to eternal death. In that case it would be a final rejection of Jesus Christ, such as that committed by those who attributed His miracles to the power of Satan (Matt. 12:31--32). Such ultimate apostasy is unforgivable, as Jesus declared: Therefore I say to you, any sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven people, but blasphemy against the Spirit shall not be forgiven. Whoever speaks a word against the Son of Man, it shall be forgiven him; but whoever speaks against the Holy Spirit, it shall not be forgiven him, either in this age or in the age to come. (Matt. 12:31--32) Praying for the restoration of such people to the fellowship from which they have departed (1 John 2:19) is futile, because "it is impossible to renew them again to repentance, since they again crucify to themselves the Son of God and put Him to open shame" (Heb. 6:6). John did not forbid prayer for such people, since it is impossible to know who they are. The apostle merely stated that prayer for them will not be answered; God has already made the final decision about their future. Supporting the view that John is referring to unbelievers is the present tense of the participle hamartanonta ("sinning"; the Greek text literally reads "If anyone sees his brother sinning a sin ..."); John elsewhere in this epistle uses the present tense to describe the habitual sins that characterize unbelievers (e.g., 3:4, 6, 8; 5:18)...

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                  • Reclaiming the Worship of the Holy Spirit (Romans 8) John MacArthur

                    01:01:55

                    from John MacArthur Added

                    http://www.gty.org/Resources/Sermons/CONF-SC12-03 2012 Shepherds' Conference (Session 03) As you are, in the routine of preaching all the time, and when I come to this conference, this is when I just kind of pour out my heart to you and that's what I've been encouraged to do. And notwithstanding, everything I said this morning about focusing on the person of the Lord Jesus Christ and the glory and majesty of Christ which we have done here at Grace Church and we will do as we look together to the Word of God in the future in the Old Testament, there's another Movement that I would like to start and I would like to start a Holy Spirit Movement. I feel very deeply about this. In fact, I have postponed the series on the Old Testament for three months because I have been so burdened to speak to this congregation at Grace Church about the Holy Spirit to restore the true honor and worship of the Holy Spirit to the church. I am convinced that the Holy Spirit is the most ignored, the most misrepresented, the most insulted, the most dishonored person in the Godhead. And I know that you know that from the first command to worship God in Exodus 34, to the final command to worship God in Revelation 22, when we are told to worship God, we are told to worship the Triune God. When the angel says at the end of Revelation 22, or near the end, to the Apostle John, "Worship God," I can assume that the angel was including the Holy Spirit, worshiping the one true God who is Father, Son and Holy Spirit. This is the most fundamental of all duties and is the essential foundation of salvation and I want to talk to you about the urgency and the importance of recovering the worship of the Holy Spirit in the church in our time.... Taken from the 2012 Shepherds' Conference; ©2012 by John MacArthur. For more information, visit www.shepherdsconference.org.

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