1. Part 2 (of 5): Law Enforcement Needlestick Prevention

    14:58

    from North Carolina Harm Reduction / Added

    71 Plays / / 2 Comments

    In this segment, the former law enforcement members answer the following questions: "What are some of the ways of reducing the risks of handling drug paraphernalia?"; and "How can we get people to declare that they are carrying syringes?". Background: According to one study, In states where syringes are criminalized, 1 in 3 officers will experience a needlestick, putting them at risk for contracting HIV and hepatitis B and C. Join three former law enforcement members (Sam Knisley, former detective, North Carolina Special Police Unit; Jen Earls, former officer, Chicago Police; and Ron Martin, former sergeant, New York City Police) in their discussion with Robert Childs, Executive Director of the North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition, about safety around handling drug paraphernalia.

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    • Part 1 (of 5): Law Enforcement Needlestick Prevention

      13:25

      from North Carolina Harm Reduction / Added

      166 Plays / / 3 Comments

      In this segment, the former law enforcement members answer the following questions: "What are the dangers of handling drug paraphernalia?"; "What are the dangers of handling syringes?"; and "What are the dangers of handling crack pipes?". Background: According to one study, In states where syringes are criminalized, 1 in 3 officers will experience a needlestick, putting them at risk for contracting HIV and hepatitis B and C. Join three former law enforcement members (Sam Knisley, former detective, North Carolina Special Police Unit; Jen Earls, former officer, Chicago Police; and Ron Martin, former sergeant, New York City Police) in their discussion with Robert Childs, Executive Director of the North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition, about safety around handling drug paraphernalia.

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      • Voices from the Harbor: Women's Experiences of Pregnancy, Addiction and Recovery

        28:57

        from North Carolina Harm Reduction / Added

        441 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Four women discuss their experiences in active addiction, interactions with social service providers, what happens when they enter treatment, and their hopes for the future. Produced by Katie Clark, who is a Research Assistant at the Yale School of Public Health and a student of the Master of Science in Public Health, Maternal and Child Health program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "This documentary is dedicated to Paul MacFarland, who passed away in October 2011. I met Paul when he was the State Opioid Treatment Authority for the State of Maine. Paul was an outstanding mentor and a significant advocate of my efforts to improve the experiences of pregnant women in methadone treatment and provide education on this topic. I will always be grateful to Paul for his wisdom, insight, and his unwavering support." –Katie Clark

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        • PINKY SHOW : Students Against Rice Eaters

          01:36

          from pinkyshow / Added

          Pinky tells a story about a smart student who used his knowledge for not so good things. For more PINKY SHOW stuff, please visit: www.PinkyShow.org

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          • Visible Invisible

            10:10

            from OSIEA / Added

            28 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Even though Malindi is hugged by pristine beaches and a history that is charming and rich in diversity, it is also home to the most invisible women in Kenya. Female drug users are marginalized, criminalized and with limited access to basic health care services. The women demand visibility; they demand their rights.

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            • Sex Worker Violence Prevention (posted 09/30/12)

              14:59

              from North Carolina Harm Reduction / Added

              802 Plays / / 1 Comment

              Update 4/2/2015: F.P.D has committed to not arresting sex workers for condoms and has had their officers undergo community sensitivity training. NCHRC applauds their efforts to do so! North Carolinians, 10 current and former sex workers and/or advocates, share their experience with the common goal of raising awareness about and reducing violence perpetrated against sex workers. Sex workers often do not report crimes committed against them because they do not want to incriminate themselves; criminalization of sex work protects the perpetrators. What types of violence do sex workers experience? What can sex workers do to avoid violence? What else can be done to make sex work safer? The North Carolina Bad Date Line, created by the North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition (www.nchrc.org,) allows sex workers to anonymously report crime against them to help each other stay safer. First in the three-part Sex Worker Violence Prevention video series. The producer, interviewer, photographer, videographer and editor is Hadley Gustafson for NCHRC; additional interviews were performed by Tessie Castillo and Robert Childs. 2012. RESOURCES: For more sex worker violence prevention tips, see http://pdxswoc.net/pbdl.html. For the North Carolina Bad Date Line, call (336) 543-8050, email ncbaddateline@gmail.com, check the Twitter feed @ncbaddateline, or see the Facebook group, http://tinyurl.com/86s6hcl. For the National Blacklist's Raleigh page, see www.nationalblacklist.com/raleigh.aspx.

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              • ineffable

                00:10

                from lovedoctor / Added

                98 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Another addiction death comes at age 27, with Amy Winehouse joining Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, Kurt Cobain and most aptly, Janis Joplin among the rock icons who died from their disorder at the same point in their young lives. And sadly, her passing also presents another occasion for well-intentioned people who misunderstand addiction to push counterproductive solutions. Janis Joplin once said that she made love to 25,000 people at her concerts, but went home alone. It’s that yearning for love and acceptance, that aching but unanswered need for connection that underlies both the drive for fame and the pain of addiction, which may be why the two are so often found together. The pain that infused Winehouse’s voice seemed inextricable from her talent and was one thing that allowed her to move so many so profoundly. In counterpoint, her joyous sounds seemed that much more uplifting. It’s that deep and complex mix of feelings that helped her fans connect to her even as she herself never benefited from that connection. That paradox is at the heart of the addiction. Here’s why: a key pillar of addiction is often self-hatred and an inability to see oneself as worthy of love. In songs like “You Know I’m No Good,” and “Back to Black,” Winehouse made those feelings painfully plain. If you’re an addict, that belief has probably always been with you. You may make a desperate attempts to pile up evidence otherwise—Look at my million-selling songs! My stadiums full of adoring fans! My husband who tolerates whatever I dish out! But it can’t possibly be enough. You know that if they really knew you, they’d hate you. For obvious reasons, this makes relationships almost impossible. The stress of being unable to take in love and social support feels unbearable and can warp the personality. Indeed, research suggests this may be one of the worst forms of stress we can experience, since our emotional systems are designed to be buffered by social contact and cannot balance themselves without it. Is it any wonder then that drugs seem like the answer? Physiologically, alcohol and opioids like heroin replicate the chemistry of relational connection, with opioids acting directly on the brain’s bonding systems and alcohol having a more indirect effect. The relief and comfort that children get in their parents’ arms is mediated by the body’s natural opioids; this same attachment system later creates the bonds between lovers and friends. Cocaine and stimulants like methamphetamine, in contrast, produce a sense of power, motivation and worthiness. Put them together, as Winehouse seems to have done and as I did during my own period of addiction, and you get moments of intense euphoria and satisfaction interspersed with simple stress relief and the ability to comfortably tolerate being in your own skin. That is, of course, when you can get the drugs, get enough of them and they work, before chasing tolerance, legal hassles or other circumstances interfere. Contrary to popular belief, however, it’s not the euphoria that hooks you. Instead, it’s the ability simply to feel OK, the silencing of that voice of self-hate and the small sense of adequacy that comes in those quiet moments. Only if an alternative method of reaching that state can be achieved is recovery possible. For me, that came in learning that my belief in my own unlovability was a delusion and that my pain could be reduced by sharing it. Unfortunately, you can’t forcibly teach this. Even if Winehouse hadn’t said “no, no, no” to many rehabs, no therapy would be able to reach her if she couldn’t first come to believe that her intolerable pain could end without self-medication. And that’s why rehabs that use coercive tactics are often so counter-productive and why trying to force abstinence can backfire. We know that the British system of addiction care offers more access to “harm reduction” programs that don’t require abstinence — but we don’t know whether Winehouse was offered this approach, what the circumstances of her death were and whether anything could have prevented it. Over the next few weeks, I’ll continue to cover policies and practices that might reduce overdose deaths, and they do exist. One thing, however, is certain. Blaming drugs or Winehouse’s “enablers” for her death misses the point: what she needed was compassion, most of all from herself. Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2011/07/24/amy-winehouse-and-the-pain-of-addiction/#ixzz1nV6EgkQ4

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                • Dept. of Health "Going Over"

                  05:14

                  from KEVIN McKIERNAN / Added

                  108 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Award winning film featuring real stories of "going over" - the heroin users' term for overdose. Part of a harm reduction campaign designed to educate users about the Recovery Position in order to save lives. Featuring the voices of heroin users, filmed using actors (and an amazing dancer Frank) over an intense 2 days on a purpose-built set. DoP Ed Wild. Directed by Kevin McKiernan

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                  • Last Man Standing

                    02:18

                    from North Carolina Harm Reduction / Added

                    82 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Steven "Gator" Daniels is a former heroin and crack addict who now volunteers in the streets of his native Winston Salem, NC, distributing clean syringes to help current addicts avoid contracting HIV and hepatitis B and C. (Note: the injector in this film does not use proper injection technique—she does not insert the syringe at the correct angle.) Photography, video and editing by Hadley Gustafson, 2010.

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                    • Harm Reduction for Youth

                      59:41

                      from USICH / Added

                      194 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Harm reduction is a model that has been very successful helping youth experiencing homelessness gain stability and direction. Using harm reduction for youth requires adapting the model to develop a youth appropriate intervention focused on positive development. Panelists Bob Mecum and Geoffrey Hollenbach from Lighthouse Youth Services in Cincinnati, OH and Jon Bradley and Chris Bicknell from Preble Street in Portland, ME joined Jennifer Ho and three youth who have experienced homelessness in an interactive forum. The panel discussed the basics of a harm reduction model for youth and the benefits gained from meeting youth where they are at, offering them the supports and trusting relationships they need to gain stability.

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