1. Glycotoxins

    01:44

    from NutritionFacts / Added

    For links to all the cited sources, a written transcript, commentary from Dr. Greger, as well as discussion and Q&A about this video, go to: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/glycotoxins/

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    • Majid Ali MD, Chelation Therapy for Heart Failure

      04:38

      from Majid Ali / Added

      I am happy to report that The New England Journal of Medicine now advises cardiologist to do toxic metal tests and chelation therapy to remove toxic metals for patients with congestive heart failure, but in a narrow-focused way.

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      • Whose Health Unaffected by Eggs

        01:54

        from NutritionFacts / Added

        For links to all the cited sources, a written transcript, commentary from Dr. Greger, as well as discussion and Q&A about this video, go to: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/whose-health-unaffected-by-eggs/

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        • How to Treat Diabetes

          01:42

          from NutritionFacts / Added

          For links to all the cited sources, a written transcript, commentary from Dr. Greger, as well as discussion and Q&A about this video, go to: http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-treat-diabetes/

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          • Tackling Heart Failure

            02:09

            from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

            27 Plays / / 0 Comments

            He hits the gym at least three times a week. Bob Friedel is pumping up his heart health. “You hook up your own monitor. It’s got three leads on it. Then you go have your blood pressure taken. And then we start working out,” says Bob Friedel. Bob has heart failure. It’s the most common condition in hospital patients 65 and older. Now new data shows it hitting younger people where it hurts. More than 1 million of the 5 million Americans suffering from heart failure are under 60. Many times the signs were there, but they didn’t see them. “Most patients have some sort of symptoms. They get very short of breath on doing any type of activity. Other people notice a lot of edema, swelling - you know in their feet or in their ankles. So there’s a variety of symptoms,” says Marion Harris-Barter, who is a registered nurse for Lee Memorial Health System. Heart failure has many causes, but the condition ultimately means the heart doesn’t pump adequately. And it gets worse over time. Patients can enjoy better health if they recognize and address their weakened heart before it breaks down. “The best way is to manage it, manage your symptoms. Being on effective medication, watching your diet, making sure you’re not eating salt. Watching your fluid intake. Exercise is very important,” says Harris-Barter. Just this year, Medicare approved heart failure for cardiac rehab, enabling millions like Bob to strengthen their hearts. “We have them warm up first, by doing a couple of laps around the gym. Then after we go ahead and put them on some cardio equipment such as a treadmill, a rowing machine. We can see on the computer screen how their heart rate is going, as well as their rhythms,” says Rosa Godoy, who is an exercise physiologist for Lee Memorial Health System. In addition to medically supervised workouts, patients are counseled on heart health including weight loss, smoking cessation and diet. Together it is a powerful combination. “The other day my heart was operating at 45%. So it’s increasing every week,” says Friedel. “There are numerous studies that show how effective cardiac rehab is in heart failure patients,” says Harris-Barter. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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            • Depression: A New Female Heart Risk

              01:42

              from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

              16 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Navigating life can present a minefield of stressors, and many women seem to be suffering from shell shock. The age group hardest hit are 55 and younger. It comes as no shock to Jennifer Vance. “Because of kids and family and sometimes they start getting into that age group where not only are they trying to raise kids but they’re also taking care of mom and dad,” says Jennifer Vance. No surprise women in this age group are also more likely to battle depression. Now studies show a link between their depression and heart attack. “The classic risk factors: high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, we’ve known about. But there’s more research now coming out that depression actually can be a risk factor as well,” says Dr. Lynne Einbinder, who is a cardiologist for Lee Memorial Health System. Some are calling it a hidden risk factor. It is also a dangerous risk factor. These younger women with moderate to severe depression are twice as likely to have a catastrophic heart event. “After a heart attack, women are more likely to die and many times women also may have a worse outcome with heart failure or other types of cardiovascular diseases,” says Dr. Einbinder. The findings may prompt doctors to take a closer look at a vulnerable population. “In the 40s to 50s, you have so many things on these women’s plates. And so I think the fact that you have these stresses may increase your risk of depression and then that unfortunately seems to be increasing the risk of heart disease,” says Dr. Einbinder. In a fast-paced world, Jennifer forces herself to slow down. “The one thing I’ve learned in the last few years is you have to take care of yourself,” says Vance. That includes treating depression before it becomes heart breaking. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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              • The Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Flows: Supplemental Video 3

                00:05

                from Annual Reviews / Added

                A supplemental video from the 2015 review by Javier Bermejo, Pablo Martínez-Legazpi, and Juan C. del Álamo, "The Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Flows," from the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-fluid-010814-014728?utm_source=vimeo&utm_medium=fl.delalamo&utm_campaign=suppvideo Shown: Time evolution of Finite-time Lyapunov exponent obained in a human volunteer by 2D+t color Doppler echocardiography, indicanting Lagrangian coherent structures in left-ventricular flow.

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                • The Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Flows: Supplemental Video 2

                  00:05

                  from Annual Reviews / Added

                  A supplemental video from the 2015 review by Javier Bermejo, Pablo Martínez-Legazpi, and Juan C. del Álamo, "The Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Flows," from the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-fluid-010814-014728?utm_source=vimeo&utm_medium=fl.delalamo&utm_campaign=suppvideo Shown: 2D+t flow field sequence (apical long axis view) in the left ventricle of a patient with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, obtained from color Doppler echocardiography and superimposed on an bright mode ultrasound image sequence depicting the ventricle anatomy. The instantaneous streamlines are shown with black lines and the velocity vector is indicated by the color map. The inset of the upper right corner shows a similar sequence for a normal volunteer.

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                  • The Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Flows: Supplemental Video 1

                    00:12

                    from Annual Reviews / Added

                    A supplemental video from the 2015 review by Javier Bermejo, Pablo Martínez-Legazpi, and Juan C. del Álamo, "The Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Flows," from the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-fluid-010814-014728?utm_source=vimeo&utm_medium=fl.delalamo&utm_campaign=suppvideo Shown: Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging sequence of 3D intraventricular flow performed in a pig’s heart, showing flow velocity vectors and isosurfaces representing a constant value of the swirling strength, which are used to visualize vortices and are colored using the value of local vorticity. The LV and RV chambers are shaded in red and blue, respectively.

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                    • Cardiac Rehab Successful for Heart Failure

                      01:51

                      from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

                      50 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      At 69, Bob Friedel may look the picture of health. But looks can be deceiving. “I have heart failure. My heart was only operating at 25%,” says Friedel. His diagnosis led him to the cardiac rehab program at Lee Memorial Health System. Newly expanded Medicare criteria allow millions of people like Bob to benefit. “Cardiac rehab is a comprehensive program for heart patients. We do a lot of work with patients regarding their diet and the risk factors for heart disease. Smoking cessation, weight loss,” explains registered nurse Marion Harris-Barter. She works with patients in the cardiac rehab program at Lee Memorial Health System. “The main thing patients see when they come in, is that they’re exercising three days a week.” What sets this gym apart is oversight. Everyone who exercises here is not only monitored, they’re heart monitored. To make sure they’re getting the most out of their workout. While patients work up a sweat, someone keeps tabs on their heart rate and rhythm. “We can see on the computer screen. So we know how hard to push them. And if we see that we’re pushing them too hard we it slow down,” says Lee Memorial Health System exercise physiologist Rosa Godoy. Up to now the 3-month program covered heart attack, angina, stents and surgery including transplants, bypass, graphs or heart repairs. Studies show it cuts the 6-year death rate in half. And it’s proving effective teaching patients to better manage their condition. “With our heart failure patients the goal is to keep them out of the hospital,” says Harris-Barter. It’s giving Bob’s heart a boost. “The other day my heart was operating at 45%. So it’s increasing every week.” A success story- as the health system’s first heart failure patient graduates from rehab View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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