1. Connecting with a Cardiologist

    01:45

    from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

    19 Plays / / 0 Comments

    About the time Frank Fear left the workforce, he decided it was time to get busy. And devote some attention to his own wellbeing. “I feel really strongly about the need, especially as you get older to be in a physician’s care and go through the annual physical, including a stress test. And work with a cardiologist as well,” says Fear. Even in the absence of symptoms, a thorough exam may detect irregularities and prevent heart conditions from developing - it begins with a baseline of tests. “The nice thing about these tests is that they’re non-invasive. There’s going to be no discomfort with them, they can be done in one setting, they’re quick and easy and they can give us a great insight into the heart,” says Dr. Lynne Einbinder, who is an interventional cardiologist with Lee Memorial Health System. They include an echocardiogram, an EKG and ultrasounds of the aorta and carotid arteries. Frank’s dad died very young from heart-related problems. It significantly raises his risk. Smokers, people with diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or obese also face steeper odds. “People may not have any early warning signs. If we can detect a blockage and treat it, that can be life-saving,” says Dr. Einbinder. Most regular heart screenings begin by age 20. It’s the age recommended by the American Heart Association for blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose testing. These can be performed through your family doctor. But as we get older, it’s time to connect with a cardiologist. “I think that preventative cardiology is one of the exciting areas that we’re looking at. We’re trying to identify who has the significant risk factors,” says Dr. Einbinder. Working with his doctors boosted Frank’s fitness and his heart health. “Then we put together a plan that I’ve tried to implement ever since then,” says Fear. Being proactive prepared him to enjoy many more active years. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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    • Preventing the First Stroke

      01:49

      from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

      12 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Something lurking in Linda Albert’s family tree is potentially damaging or deadly. It already struck several people close to her. “I have a family history of strokes - my mom and now my aunt,” says Linda Albert. Hoping to avoid the same, Linda recently took part in a free stroke screening offered by Gulf Coast Medical Center. “Because of my history, sometimes I walk around and I feel like I’m a ticking time bomb,” says Albert. Armed with the knowledge she already had, Linda got a read on her risk. “There are multiple risk factors for stroke, both modifiable - things patients can do something about, and non-modifiable risk factors - genetic factors and age. Common modifiable risk factors that we help patient address would be: hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol and smoking,” says Dr. Adam Heller, a neurologist on the medical staff of Lee Memorial Health System. Although more Americans are surviving a stroke, more are left with life-long disabilities. And at least 1 in 4 will have another stroke in their lifetime, making it very important to understand your risk and avoid the first stroke from striking. “I’m out there educating people on stroke prevention and a screening is very important,” says Tricia Meinel, who is a stroke analyst coordinator with Lee Memorial Health System. Specialized tests provide a window to your stroke risk, including heart tests to check for A-fib an irregular heart beat that can sometimes lead to stroke, glucose screening, a lipid panel and a non-invasive test that looks at blood flow. “The carotid ultra-sound machine is one of the tests that we do perform for our patients, to see if they have blocked arteries,” says Meinel. Linda Albert went through the screening and came out smiling. “It gives you a good feeling or things you need to look into,” says Albert. Thwarting a first stroke can prevent a lifetime of recovery. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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      • A New Way to Look at Alzheimer’s

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        from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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        As a neurointerventional radiologist, Nasser Razack is used to peering into the brain. That gives him a window to view one of the most troubling degenerative diseases: Alzheimer’s. “If you look at Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and heart disease, heart attacks - they have all the same risk factors,” says Dr. Razack. These health issues share a commonality: a build up of plaque. The link between plaque and many health conditions is well-established. “If you have a plaque that causes a narrowing in a blood vessel in your leg, we call that peripheral vascular disease. If it causes a narrowing in a blood vessel in your heart, we call that a heart attack. We find the same plaques in the brain that cause Alzheimer’s disease,” says Dr. Razack. The million dollar question - can you prevent the buildup of plaque, and if you could, can it help prevent Alzheimer’s? The research is leaning that way. By addressing the common risk factors which spark inflammation and lead to the development of plaque. “If you look at all of these different plaques, they’re all inflammatory lesions. Meaning inflammation revs these things up,” says Dr. Razack. Some research found people who used prescription anti-inflammatory drugs to manage chronic diseases had much lower rates of Alzheimer’s. There is reason to believe that addressing known cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking and obesity, can also have a beneficial effect. “The way to really start obviating all of these inflammatory diseases, it’s modifying our diets and doing other things that reduce inflammation in our body,” says Dr. Razack. A proper diet, limiting processed foods and getting regular exercise are the building blocks of a sound body- and now possibly, a sound mind. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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        • Depression Raises Female Heart Risk

          01:34

          from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

          19 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Everyone suffers the blues occasionally. But for some, depression is more than a passing phase. Recent research finds this delicate state of mind is posing a real health risk for women. “Women that had that moderate to severe depression, they were twice as likely to have either a heart attack, an artery block that required a stent, or death from a cardiac event,” says Dr. Lynne Einbinder, who is a cardiologist with Lee Memorial Health System. Classic cardio risk factors include high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity and smoking. Depression and stress were thought to have an influence as well. Now experts have data to back it up. In a large study group, depression doubled the likelihood of a catastrophic event. Hardest hit are women under 55. “This is the age where, you know, in the forties to fifties you have a full time job or you’re working at home and doing a lot of things in the community. You’ve got children; you’ve got a spouse to balance. These stresses may increase your risk of depression,” says Dr. Einbinder. The addition of depression as a heart risk factor is prompting some doctors to dig deeper into their patient’s state of mind. Treating depression can be helpful both in terms of quality of life and hopefully the prevention of heart disease. “One thing that we have to do both as primary care physicians and also a specialty cardiologist is talk to our patients about depression,” says Dr. Einbinder. Soothing the troubled heart may be a powerful and life-saving intervention for a vulnerable population of women. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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          • Rising Statin Use - Lowering Cardio Risk

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            from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

            5 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Chances are great that you or someone you love is on statins. “Statins are the first group of cholesterol medications that have consistently shown reductions in cardiovascular events when we treat high cholesterol. So they don’t just reduce the numbers they actually reduce the events,” says Lee Memorial Health System cardiologist Dr. Brian Taschner. A recent study found statin use at its highest levels ever, due in part to last year’s change in guidelines. Under the new recommendations, 56 million Americans ages 40 to 75 now fall into an eligible category. The rise in statin use is meant to lower the risk of cardiovascular events. Previous guidelines focused on existing heart patients, prescribing drug therapy to lower cholesterol to a normal level. The new rules focus on the odds - including a wider group of people, based on their future risk. “These guidelines try to simplify the process and they define four categories of patients that are eligible for cholesterol therapy and really two doses of cholesterol medicine. Either high intensity or moderate intensity,” says Dr. Taschner. Considering factors like age and health conditions like diabetes, some may take the drug as a primary prevention. In addition to people with existing cardiovascular disease, more Americans may be taking statins to heart. “Because there’s so much data supporting their benefit,” says Dr. Taschner. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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            • The Plant Based Food Pyramid

              01:59

              from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

              36 Plays / / 0 Comments

              As Karen Reed learned, simply cutting meat out of your food equation doesn’t add up to truly healthy eating. “We ate very little red meat. We did fresh vegetables. But we loved our cheese and we liked butter. It was a lot of fat and that’s really the culprit for a lot of problems,” says Karen Reed. By age 60 she was packing on pounds and heart problems. “I had high blood pressure and high cholesterol and very high lipids, triglycerides,” says Reed. “Diet really has an impact on a number of the cardiac risk factors,” says Dr. Brian Taschner, who is a cardiologist with Lee Memorial Health System. Cardiologist Brian Taschner is Karen’s specialist. He believes the typical American diet could use a healthy makeover. “We eat very little fruits and vegetables. So on average about 10% or less of our, our calorie intake is from fruits and vegetables and when we look at the vegetables consumed, about half of those are potatoes. And most of those are fried,” says Dr. Taschner. It reinforces the point that all fruits and vegetables aren’t created equal. Taking your diet green, means 50-60% of calories come from plant sources. The majority being leafy greens which top the plant-based food pyramid. “So things spinach and kale, chard, romaine lettuce, those things and then really incorporating all other types of vegetables into your diet. So that really should be the base of the pyramid. And then other things: whole grain carbohydrates. Like the brown rice, the quinoa, faro. And then legumes, so different kinds of beans, should be the next level. Healthy fats, so things like avocados, nuts, olive oil, that should be the next level of the pyramid. And then realizing that most people are going to still consume some animal protein, that really should be the next level when you maybe limit that to about 10% of your diet,” says Dr. Taschner. The switch took a big bite out of Karen’s health woes. “It’s just completely changed our life over the last year. My blood pressure has been much better, I’m on less medication. I’ve lost twenty pounds,” says Reed. A proper plant-based plan may be the beginning of a health transformation. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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              • Proper Nutrition | Health and Wellness | Restoration And Renew

                01:13:53

                from Shawnette Sampson / Added

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                What The Doctors Aren't telling you. Here is Some Key Information That Will Help You Restore And Renew Your Health. For more information visit www.RestorationAndRenewal.com

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                • Health Conditions by the Numbers

                  02:42

                  from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

                  23 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Chances are you or someone you love has one or more of these health conditions. As we age, Americans tend to accumulate medical conditions. Based on the most prescribed drugs, these are the top seven most common conditions. The number one spot goes to hypothyroidism. Synthetic hormones are widely used to supplement an under-active thyroid. Women over 60 are most deficient. “This hormone regulates and controls metabolism in all cells in your body. And if it has any malfunction, less production or overproduction, can affect mostly all your body,” says Dr. Heitham Aljouni, an endocrinologist with Lee Memorial Health System. Nearly 99 million Americans age 20 and over have high cholesterol. It’s a top risk factor for heart attack and stroke. Drugs are a main course of treatment. “If you look at the top ten drugs over the past ten years or so some of the statins are always near the top,” says Lee Memorial Health System cardiologist Dr. Brian Taschner. “Statins are the first group of cholesterol medications that have consistently shown reductions in cardiovascular events.” Think digestion, or indigestion actually, for the next most frequently medicated health condition. Heartburn and GERD affect more than 20% of our population who use a prescription or over-the-counter drug. Next up: breathing problems, including asthma and COPD which is the third leading cause of death in this country. “Almost 5% of the us population has it. It is an underestimated cause of deaths but the chances of dying from this from developing respiratory failure which is the inability to breath, the inability to get enough oxygen, are very high,” explains Dr. Sagar Naik. He is a pulmonologist with Lee Memorial Health System. Drugs to treat high blood pressure closely followed by diabetes rank 5th and 6th in frequency, affecting millions of Americans and leading to additional health issues. Finally- meds for anxiety and depression are the 7th most widely used drugs. Both are considered contributors for heart attacks. According to Lee Memorial Health System cardiologist Dr. Lynne EInbinder, “There is some evidence that treating the depression can be helpful both in terms of quality of life and other health issues and hopefully for prevention of heart disease as well.” Some conditions are brought on by lifestyle choices such as unhealthy eating and smoking. Others silently creep up and by the time of diagnosis, medication is often required. The take-away: stay on top of your health- an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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                  • Taking Food to Heart

                    02:02

                    from Lee Memorial Health System / Added

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                    Hoping for a healthy diet, Karen Reed and her husband carefully considered their choices. “I thought we were really doing well. We ate very little red meat. We ate fish most of the time. We did fresh vegetables,” says Karen Reed. Despite diet and regular exercise, Karen ran into heart issues. “I had high blood pressure and high cholesterol and very high lipids, triglycerides,” says Reed. So cardiologist Brian Taschner took a closer look at Karen’s diet, to see what was eating her. “Coronary disease, many cancers are actually felt to be a disease of wealthier countries, which America is considered, in large part related to their diet and consumption of animal proteins,” says Dr. Brian Taschner, who is a cardiologist with Lee Memorial Health System. Cultures with less reliance on animal proteins have lower rates of heart disease. “The thought is that really the animal protein plays a large role in elevating the cholesterol level and that’s one of the reasons we see such a prevalence of vascular disease here. Not necessarily just from the fats, but also from consumption of a lot of the meats and the dairy that we consume,” says Dr. Taschner. Karen was ripe for cutting out meat and going with a plant-based diet, hoping it would get her heart back on track. Studies show it may do even more. Some research suggests a plant-based diet may roll back the clock on heart issues. “Patients getting off of their diabetes medicines, their blood pressure medicines and actually reversal of heart disease. They’ve done angiograms on these patients before and after and seen significant improvements,” says Dr. Taschner. Plant-based eating is now a top health trend. Instead of meat-heavy meals, the focus is on plants—leafy greens, whole grains, legumes, fruits, nuts, seeds and soy. Going green worked for Karen. Karen reed/watching her heart health Runs: “I’m on half the medication I was on for my lipids and my triglycerides as before. I’ve lost twenty pounds. I feel so much better,” says Reed. Taking food to heart- one of the few instances where you can eat your way to better health. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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                    • Kyani Webinar DS 4-13SD

                      01:00:45

                      from Jon Kane / Added

                      16 Plays / / 1 Comment

                      This is an awesome presentation explaining Kyani Nutritionals, Corporate expertise, Your potential earnings when you take action & share Kyani's products with those you care about!

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