1. Sparring - Dealing with a Head Mover - How to Box (Quick Videos)

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    As many of my fighters will testify, I constantly shout "move your head" when they're in the ring sparring or even on fight nights. There is nothing worse than watching a talented boxer with all the skills, keeping his head in one place, allowing shots to land freely. Just moving the head slightly can make your opponent miss punch after punch, giving you more opportunities to land your counters (counter-punches). But this can lead to another problem that has been asked in this quick video, and that is "How do you deal with a constant head mover". It's all very well making your opponent miss with well timed head movement, but it's incredibly frustrating if your opponent is returning the favour by doing the same thing. On the video I outlay a few things that have helped me, primarily "Go for the body" and ignore the head. There is a reason for Joe Fraziers famous saying "If you kill the body, the head will die" and that's because it's true. The head is a small part of the body and is easy and quick to move, but the body on the other hand is a much larger target and is much slower to move. So, if you get into a ring with a 'head mover', start aiming lower, try jabbing (not to his head) but to the chest area. Go for body hooks and straights to the body too. These shots will take their tole, they will slow down your opponent. Quite often body punches encourage the guard to lower, in an attempt to block them - opening the head back up for attack. I hope this video helps and feel free to post any questions you have and I will get back to you as soon as I can. Happy Training. Cornelius Carr former BBBofC British Super-Middleweight & WBF World Middleweight Champion

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    • Fighting on the ropes - How to Box (Quick Videos)

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      'How to Box' - Season 2, Episode 3 - 'Fighting on the ropes' Getting stuck on the ropes for the first time can be quite a daunting experience. The last thing on your mind when you begin boxing, is to relax into it and stay there and fight. Your natural instinct just tells you to get off the ropes as quickly as possible. But with a bit of time and practice, fighting on the ropes can be a great place to rest, avoid punches and pick your shots. There is no-one better at doing this, in the boxing world, than the great Floyd Mayweather. He is an absolute master of this technique and is living proof of how to get to the top using defence. Some may well dislike some of his fights, putting them down as boring, but from a fighters perspective, it is fantastic. No one likes being hit and if you can withstant a fight, with as little hits on you as possible, whilst reigning hard blows down on your opponent, to me that is boxing - that is the pinnacle - use your brain to not get hit....but still win. Everyone enjoys a tear up, but if you can hold your own in the ring against an aggressive, persistent, mega-fit hard hitter and come out with barely a scratch on you - you've made it! It's also made boxing more interesting, more people are learning and using this way of fighting - and in turn this leads to other people trying to counter-act this way of fighting (this has not been managed in Mayweathers case). So, watch the quick video we have made, grab a training partner and get on the ropes. Start off nice and light, make sure you use you lead shoulder to cover your chin and also use this shoulder to parry punches. Have a go and bouncing and spinning off the ropes and bouncing and hitting - A important point to remember when using the ropes is not to bounce yourself onto your opponents shots though, this can really hurt.... I hope this video helps and feel free to post any questions you have and I will get back to you as soon as I can.

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      • Opening up your opponent - How to Box (Quick Videos)

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        So, we are back with our 2nd instalment of videos, it has taken a while for the filming and editing but we are very happy with the results and I'm sure you'll find them useful. After receiving feedback from our first 'How to Box' videos - where we go through the basics, we have aimed this second set for the beginner/intermediate boxer and the videos are based on common questions that I have been asked in training and online. Even if you are not sparring yet, it is still good to watch and lock the techniques in your memory banks for a future date. 'How to Box' Season 2 kicks off with "How to open up your opponent" with the aim of helping you out when sparring - or even if you are fighting for real. It is all very well backing your opponent up into a corner, but if you are not getting your shots through, and are only hitting arms and gloves, sometimes all you are doing is tiring yourself out. With this video I run through just a few quick and simple boxing techniques that have helped me in the ring over the years. The double tap to the head and then slipping down for the hard body shot is a classic boxing technique, by tapping to the head you can draw your opponents hands up, giving you just that little bit of room, to squeeze in a hard hook to the body. This is all about timing and speed, so make sure you practice, it is a easy move to practice on the bag. The first 2 punches are literally a distraction, so they really don't need to be that hard, but delivering the hard low hook is all about the slip. The slip lets you wind up the power for this shot, it's also likely that your opponent will throw out his right hand after your taps to the head. By adding the slip into this movement you will avoid incoming punches too. The next technique (also shown on this video) is the pulling down of the guard. This can be a tricky movement to perfect, especially with gloves on, so I quite often get my students to run through it wearing just their wraps first so they get the fluidity correct before trying it with glove on. Just follow exactly as shown on the video and remember this technique is all about speed, the quicker you can do it the more likely you will land your punch. If you have any questions on these techniques, just ask and I will be happy to answer. If you have any suggestions for boxing training that you think we should base a future video on, again just put it in the comments below and you never know it might be the next video we post. If you are having problems with a technique it can be quite hard to explain in words, but easy to show in film, so feel free to send us your video links and I will help out where I can. If you don't want the whole world to see you, you can send a private video link, we will still try and help you out :-) Happy Training. Cornelius Carr former BBBofC British Super-Middleweight & WBF World Middleweight Champion

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        • Boxing School In Russian - Русская бокс школа

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          Do you want to discover the world of proper and respectful fighting? Check it out: http://www.howtofightdojo.com

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          • Uppercut, Hook - How to Box (Quick Videos)

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            "Uppercut, hook" is one of my absolute favourite techniques. I love the feeling you get from being able to finish one punch technique (in this case the right uppercut) and being in the exact "wound up" position to throw the next punch (the left hook). I love it because they simply just flow into one another and the amount of power you can generate is fantastic. I demonstrate 2 examples of this in the video, but the best way to implement it by far (in my opinion), is the longer range version. If you can lure in your victim, making him/her think they have the upper hand, then bang, bang, (right uppercut, left hook). The power of the punches together, coupled with the forward momentum of your opponent, leads to a cracking little technique that can floor most people in the perfect situation. That's what makes me passionate about boxing, it really is "The Sweet Science". It is about using your brain and attributes to outwit your opponents, both physically and mentally. It's a "full contact" game of chess, setting traps, being able to react and respond to your opponents different tactics. So give this one a go in sparring (lightly). This also goes for any technique, try and draw your opponents onto your punches, it's a hard skill to perfect, but it's never too early to start trying. If you forward to the 3 minute mark on the video below, you can see me executing the Uppercut, Left Hook. Remember, the advantage with this technique is that if you miss with the Uppercut, you can still catch them with the Hook.

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            • Punch Bag Combination 4 - Learn Boxing (Bag Combos)

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              See more at http://www,sneakpunch.com “Double jab, cross hook” – a simple punch bag technique for this weeks video. Boxing is all about doing the basics correctly, so nailing the simple techniques in training is essential. I have seen a lot of fights over the years and witnessed good fighters lose, just because they hadn’t drilled their basics. There is really nothing like entering the boxing ring, you are on your own, experiencing a fight to survival. Very often I see students who have trained well, look good on the pads, great at sparring – but as soon as they hit the ring in the first few fights, all their training goes out the window, as the adrenalin kicks in and they start thrashing wildly with haymakers. The more time you put in practicing keeping your guard and movements tight and making (throwing the jab and straights) second nature, the better your chances of survival. You can keep your wildly thrashing opponent away with good, fast, stiff jabs and beat them to the punch with concise straight crosses. Unless one of the haymakers gets through – 9 times out of 10, the relaxed, well drilled fighter wins the day. In this quick video, I show how to back your opponent up with multiple jabs (single jab, double jab, triple jab), a sharp right cross and if you see an opening a hard left hook. Relax in the ring, take your time and remember if you are throwing punches, you are also creating opportunities for your opponent to counter. So get in attack and get out.

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              • Right Uppercut - How to Box (Quick Videos)

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                It's all about the right upper cut in this video. In this demonstration, I show 2 variations of the right uppercut. The close uppercut, for when you are up close to your opponent, and the long uppercut, that you can use from a longer range. Uppercuts are a great punch, as you can generate lots of power in them and you can start to throw them at your opponent just beyond their field of vision. The short uppercut is used to drive up through the guard of an opponent. Aiming for the underside of the chin, you are trying to whip your opponents head back. When the head gets whipped back, this causes confusion, and this is the time to start following up with more punches - hooks, straights etc. The long uppercut is a harder technique and if timed correctly can be a great knockout punch. To get as much knockout power into your punch as possible, you need to encourage the opponent moving towards you. Combine the momentum of your opponent advancing towards you with your punch powering aimed at them, to give you the perfect recipe for a knockout shot. This advice is perfect for all punches, if you can draw people onto your punches, they will always be harder and this is one of the great skills of boxing.

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                • Pad Work Drills - How to Box (Quick Videos)

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                  In this quick video I will demonstrating 3 boxing pad work drills. The first 2 combinations are fairly basic, but it is very important to get your essential techniques correct in boxing, so give these a try. When throwing your punches, try to remember your defence by keeping your other hand up guarding your chin. When throwing straights, turn your punches at the end to generate more power. The last combination is a little bit harder, but is great for practising your slipping. If you don't feel you can master it straight away, break the sequence down and practice the movements slowly. It is important to get the technique correct before going for it at full speed and at full power.

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                  • Double Left Hook - How to Box (Quick Videos)

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                    My theory is, if you can hit them with one shot, then you can hit them with two. In the quick "how to box" video above, I demonstrate a few variations of the double hook. The first one is the double head hook. You can throw this technique after slipping the right cross, add it to the end of a combination or, if you are feeling confident, use it as an opening move straight from your ready stance. It is definitely worth you experimenting with the "high to low hook" and "low to high hook". If the high hook is blocked you can go straight down stairs and vice versa. This is a great way to create openings on your opponent. With the double low hook, I like to tap to see the space, then power the second body hook through. When using this in sparring and when in the ring, again, as I always stress, make sure you mix it up. Don't keep throwing the same combinations, keep your opponent guessing, this will make landing your punches easier and give you a higher landing success rate. http://www.sneakpunch.com

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                    • Left Uppercut - How to Box (Quick Videos)

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                      In this quick video I am demonstrating how to throw the left uppercut. Start off in your boxing stance, imagine a right cross coming towards your head and slip to your left (based on an Orthodox stance). Distribute your weight onto your left leg (approx. 80/20, 80% on your front leg). Bend your left leg slightly - you are now ready to throw the uppercut. With your front foot grounded, drive your left hand up in between your opponents guard - aiming for the chin. Whilst powering the punch up, twist your hips clockwise and keep your other hand in the guard position covering the right side of your face. With the uppercut, you are trying to knock your opponents head back. The uppercut when thrown correctly is a powerful punch and can easily knockout the opposition. A great follow to the left uppercut is the straight right cross. In fact when you complete the uppercut, you are left in a perfect "coiled spring" position, to power the cross forward at maximum power. Practice this move on the bag and pads and see for yourself how well these techniques compliment each other.

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