1. 2006 MINNESOTA BROADCASTING HALL OF FAME

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    • DAN DONOVAN Hall of Fame Induction 2006

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      Minnesota Broadcasting Hall of Fame Dan Donovan Inducted 2006 Dan Donovan, whose real name was Blaine Harvey, was a radio veteran whose career dated back to the glory days of rock 'n' roll. Born in Philadelphia on January 22, 1941, Harvey got interested in radio growing up in little Biglerville, Pennsylvania. He began his career there at WGET, later moving to WSBA in York, Pennsylvania. In the early 1960s, after studying journalism at Penn State, he moved on to WICE Radio in Providence, Rhode Island. He then moved to WMEX in Boston and WCBM in Baltimore before beginning a ten-year run, as “Dangerous Dan Donovan” at WFIL AM in Philadelphia. “The station was performing at its peak, and its ‘boss jocks’ ruled the airwaves,” said Gerry Wilkinson, CEO of the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia. He came to KS95 FM, in the Twin Cities, in 1979, and joined KOOL 108 FM in 1991. "The Geezer,” as he called himself, was one of the region’s best known and best loved DJs with his popular afternoon drive and Sunday oldies shows. City Pages named him “Best Twin Cities FM Radio Personality of 2006.” In 2007 he celebrated fifty years in radio. Blaine Harvey, whose on-air name was Dan Donovan, died August 31, 2014, after a heart attack, at the age of 73.

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      • JACK HORNER

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        Museum of Broadcasting Hall of Fame Jack Horner 2001 Charter Inductee Jack Horner, "Mr. Sports," compiled one of the most impressive lists of firsts in broadcasting history, and has set high standards for those who followed him. His career began in 1935 at KGFK Moorhead. After working at WSAU Wausau, Wisconsin, KTRI Sioux City, Iowa, WTMJ Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and KFJM/KILO Grand Forks, North Dakota, he joined KSTP Saint Paul/Minneapolis in 1944 to broadcast University of Minnesota football games and other sports. On December 7, 1947, he hosted the first live television program in Minnesota history for KSTP TV. He also broadcast the first baseball game ever televised in Minnesota, the first no-hit no-run game ever televised, and the first televised appearance of the Harlem Globetrotters. He joined KEYD TV Minneapolis/Saint Paul (now KMSP TV) in 1954, then moved to WTCN TV Minneapolis/Saint Paul (now KARE TV). He did sports programming for Twin Cities radio stations WPBC, KJJO, and KFAN. He also was active as a volunteer, broadcasting a weekly one-hour sports show for Minnesota State Services for the Blind for over 20 years. Jack Horner passed away, at the age of 92, on January 10, 2005.

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        • STANLEY E. HUBBARD

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          Museum of Broadcasting Hall of Fame Stanley E. Hubbard 2001 Charter Inductee Stanley E. Hubbard, founder of Hubbard Broadcasting, one of the most successful and innovative companies in the history of the industry, was a true pioneer. He signed on his first station, WAMD Minneapolis, in 1923. It was the first station ever put on the air with the intention of surviving solely from advertising sales, and the first ever to air a 15-minute daily newscast. He founded KSTP Saint Paul/ Minneapolis, one of the country's most powerful stations, in 1928. Thanks to a deal he made with the Saint Paul Orpheum Theater, KSTP was the first station to put stars like Eddie Cantor, the Marx Brothers, and Jack Benny on the air. In 1938 he bought the first television camera RCA ever sold, and began closed circuit television productions. The television station he founded, KSTP TV, began regular broadcasting in April 1948, the northwest's first television station, and the first to bring local news coverage to television. It was the nation's first NBC TV affiliate and became the nation's first all-color TV station. For his many achievements, the Minnesota Broadcasters Association honored him with its first ever Pioneer Broadcaster award in 1970. Mr. Hubbard passed away, at the age of 95, on December 27, 1992.

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          • JOHN MACDOUGALL

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            Museum of Broadcasting Hall of Fame John MacDougall Inducted 2004 Born and raised in Minneapolis, John MacDougall began his broadcasting career playing the role of Sgt. Johnny Mac on “Midnight in Munich” on the Armed Forces Radio Network. Following his military service, MacDougall studied radio broadcasting at the University of Minnesota and KUOM. Upon graduation, he was hired by WLOL, and in 1948 he moved to New York, where his deep voice and smooth diction earned him major voiceover accounts with several large advertising agencies. While visiting Minneapolis in 1958, MacDougall learned that Bill Ingram was leaving KSTP-TV. MacDougall applied for the position and went on to anchor the 10 PM News. In 1970, MacDougall and Bob Ryan served as the first dual-anchor television news team in the Upper Midwest on “Twin News Tonight” on KSTP. In 1971, MacDougall left KSTP to join a Saint Paul ad agency, but returned 13 years later when he was named news director of KSTP AM, where he continued to work until his death, at the age of 68, on October 13, 1993. For all who knew him, John MacDougall is remembered as an inspiring mentor who set the benchmark for professional broadcast news delivery.

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            • JOHN MAYASICH

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              Museum of Broadcasting Hall of Fame John Mayasich Inducted 2005 John Mayasich has enjoyed an outstanding career as one of the top broadcast executives in the region. A University of Minnesota graduate, Mayasich entered the broadcast industry with a sales position at KSTP Radio in 1957. He moved to WFRV TV in Green Bay, Wisconsin, in 1959 and later became sales manager at WDUZ Radio in Green Bay. He returned to Hubbard Broadcasting in 1974, and became general manager of KS95 FM, making it the highest-rated FM station in the top 30 US markets. In 1983, he began a twelve-year term as president of the radio division of Hubbard Broadcasting, later serving as head of public relations. He retired in 1997, but remains active as a consultant to Hubbard Broadcasting. Widely respected among his peers in the industry, he served for nine years on the board of directors of the Minnesota Broadcasters Association, and was its president from 1993 to 1994. A talented athlete, he is a member of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame and an Olympic medal winner.

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              • STAN TURNER

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                Museum of Broadcasting Hall of Fame Stan Turner Inducted 2009 Stan Turner’s distinguished career in broadcasting goes back to 1965, when he joined the news department at KDWB Radio. He moved to KSTP Radio News in 1966, but rejoined KDWB as news director a year later. He returned to Hubbard Broadcasting in 1968, taking a job as government reporter for KSTP TV. Positions as associate news director, weekend anchor, news director, and then weekday co-anchor, followed. In 1989 he took on the additional responsibilities of helping to launch a new satellite news operation: CONUS / All News Channel. Stan became the primetime weekday anchor and writer at CONUS, whose broadcasts were seen by a national audience of eleven million. Since 2004 Stan has been news director, reporter, and newscaster with the MNN Radio Network, and hosts a Saturday program on KLBB Radio. In addition to his broadcasting duties, Stan has devoted many hours to teaching young people interested in journalism. He is a former member of the Advisory Board for the Journalism Department at the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, a former adjunct professor of Broadcast Journalism at the University of St. Thomas, and a former president of the Minnesota Press Club.

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                • BRAD JACOBS

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                  Museum of Broadcasting Hall of Fame Brad Jacobs He began his career as a television news photographer shooting still photos and 16 mm movie film. Today the equipment has changed, but Bradley R. Jacobs is still going strong. Jacobs spent two years in Duluth at KDAL TV before joining KSTP TV in 1957. He has a nose for news and a knack for getting to breaking news quickly, not just in the Twin Cities, but all over the world. He visited the Middle East with Bob Ryan to cover the 1967 Egyptian/Israeli conflict, shooting daily news reports and two half-hour documentaries. He spent two years traveling across the United States and Canada bringing viewers the latest news of advances in medicine. Closer to home, he got exclusive footage of Mikhail Gorbachev’s 1989 visit to Minnesota, and was first on the scene at the capture of the “Fishing Hat Bandit” in 2005. He won an Emmy Award for his coverage of an explosion in St. Paul in 1993, with his camera already rolling as the emergency crews arrived. Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, Bob Hope, Roy Rogers, the Lennon Sisters, Andy Williams, and Phyllis Diller are just a few of the celebrities his camera has captured over the years. One of the nation’s outstanding photojournalists, he is a true pioneer whose work helped define his profession. Inducted October 27, 2007

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                  • DAN DONOVAN

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                    Minnesota Broadcasting Hall of Fame Dan Donovan Inducted 2006 Dan Donovan, whose real name was Blaine Harvey, was a radio veteran whose career dated back to the glory days of rock 'n' roll. Born in Philadelphia on January 22, 1941, Harvey got interested in radio growing up in little Biglerville, Pennsylvania. He began his career there at WGET, later moving to WSBA in York, Pennsylvania. In the early 1960s, after studying journalism at Penn State, he moved on to WICE Radio in Providence, Rhode Island. He then moved to WMEX in Boston and WCBM in Baltimore before beginning a ten-year run, as “Dangerous Dan Donovan” at WFIL AM in Philadelphia. “The station was performing at its peak, and its ‘boss jocks’ ruled the airwaves,” said Gerry Wilkinson, CEO of the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia. He came to KS95 FM, in the Twin Cities, in 1979, and joined KOOL 108 FM in 1991. "The Geezer,” as he called himself, was one of the region’s best known and best loved DJs with his popular afternoon drive and Sunday oldies shows. City Pages named him “Best Twin Cities FM Radio Personality of 2006.” In 2007 he celebrated fifty years in radio. Blaine Harvey, whose on-air name was Dan Donovan, died August 31, 2014, after a heart attack, at the age of 73.

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                    • CHARLIE BUSH

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                      Museum of Broadcasting Hall of Fame Charlie Bush Inducted 2009 With one of broadcasting’s most distinctive voices and an outrageous sense of humor, Charlie Bush used his glibness of tongue and sharp wit early on when he won a national debate at West Point for his alma mater, the University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire, in 1959. To finance his education he became a radio personality at WAXX radio in Wisconsin. Enamored with broadcasting, he came to KSTP four years later. He did his famous brand of morning news when teamed with Chuck Knapp on Knapp & Bush. He emceed a TV talent show called Stairway to Stardom, had an all-night radio talk show, and hosted a late-night TV program called Charlie Horse, the show that “pulled your leg ever so slightly.” In 1981 he went to WCCO-FM and a year later to WDGY. From 1983 to 1991 he was a K102 personality, delighting listeners with John Hines on Hines & Bush. Charlie’s resonant voice and hearty laugh made him a natural for radio, and his adept, quick-witted wordplay made him a listener favorite. Filled with rhymes and alliteration, his “news kickers” were unforgettable. “They aren’t good, but they’re quick,” he would quip. The kindhearted Charlie Bush passed away on October 30, 1991.

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