1. AAUP 2014 - DH Hernandez

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    • AAUP 2014 - Publishing in the Digital Humanities (4/4)

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      There are significant initiatives at many campuses to invest in the digital humanities. While DH has become a proxy for a lot of different issues, as humanities publishers, it's becoming more and more likely that we will need to expand the capacity for what it is we can publish. DH scholars may continue to write long-form text, but more and more often it will be embedded with DH features such as multimedia files, spatial mapping, data sets, archives, and social sandboxes. How will we publish these? How will these affect the work of editorial, marketing, production, and other staff? What types of collaborations will presses need in order to "publish" these new multimodal books? Will these books be digital-only? This panel will be light on presentations and heavy on Q&A and interactivity, so bring your ideas. We encourage you to tweet questions and comments in advance to #AAUP14DH Chair: Kevin Hawkins, Director of Library Publishing, University of North Texas Panelists: Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communications, Modern Language Association; Christine Hernández, Curator of Special Collections, the Latin American Library at Tulane University; John Sherer, Director, University of North Carolina Press http://www.aaupnet.org/events-a-conferences/annual-meeting/aaup-2014/program

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      • AAUP 2014 - Publishing in the Digital Humanities (2/4)

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        There are significant initiatives at many campuses to invest in the digital humanities. While DH has become a proxy for a lot of different issues, as humanities publishers, it's becoming more and more likely that we will need to expand the capacity for what it is we can publish. DH scholars may continue to write long-form text, but more and more often it will be embedded with DH features such as multimedia files, spatial mapping, data sets, archives, and social sandboxes. How will we publish these? How will these affect the work of editorial, marketing, production, and other staff? What types of collaborations will presses need in order to "publish" these new multimodal books? Will these books be digital-only? This panel will be light on presentations and heavy on Q&A and interactivity, so bring your ideas. We encourage you to tweet questions and comments in advance to #AAUP14DH Chair: Kevin Hawkins, Director of Library Publishing, University of North Texas Panelists: Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communications, Modern Language Association; Christine Hernández, Curator of Special Collections, the Latin American Library at Tulane University; John Sherer, Director, University of North Carolina Press http://www.aaupnet.org/events-a-conferences/annual-meeting/aaup-2014/program

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        • AAUP 2014 - Publishing in the Digital Humanities (1/4)

          11:20

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          There are significant initiatives at many campuses to invest in the digital humanities. While DH has become a proxy for a lot of different issues, as humanities publishers, it's becoming more and more likely that we will need to expand the capacity for what it is we can publish. DH scholars may continue to write long-form text, but more and more often it will be embedded with DH features such as multimedia files, spatial mapping, data sets, archives, and social sandboxes. How will we publish these? How will these affect the work of editorial, marketing, production, and other staff? What types of collaborations will presses need in order to "publish" these new multimodal books? Will these books be digital-only? This panel will be light on presentations and heavy on Q&A and interactivity, so bring your ideas. We encourage you to tweet questions and comments in advance to #AAUP14DH Chair: Kevin Hawkins, Director of Library Publishing, University of North Texas Panelists: Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communications, Modern Language Association; Christine Hernández, Curator of Special Collections, the Latin American Library at Tulane University; John Sherer, Director, University of North Carolina Press http://www.aaupnet.org/events-a-conferences/annual-meeting/aaup-2014/program

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          • AAU Undergraduate Stories

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            Hands-on Research Makes a Difference – Powered by AAU

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            • Abigail McEwen: Archiving Modern Latin American Art: Sites, Students and Collaboration in the Greater Washington Area

              01:08:30

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              Abigail McEwen, Assistant Professor of Latin American Art Department of Art History and Archeology, University of Maryland Monday, April 1, 2013

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              • Academic Freedom? A conversation about the way things are and the way things could be... (2/4)

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                Documentation of panel discussion and open conversation hosted on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 from 7:00 - 9:00 p.m in Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall at the University of Winnipeg. This event was open and free for all; the promotional text was as follows: In light of recent scandals around the world involving academics being served cease and desist notices for producing valid research challenging corporate activity, being arrested under suspicion of terrorism, or losing tenure without due process as a clear response to different ways of thinking and teaching, it is a ripe moment to discuss intellectual and ethical integrity vis-à-vis academic freedom in the context of societal expectations. Academics are perceived as belonging to a certain social and intellectual "class". In what ways can they gravitate toward a genuinely ethical definition of their profession while confronting the influences that expect them to toe the line in order to maintain status? With a view to opening discussion on this subject, four University of Winnipeg faculty members have been invited to express perspectives concerning the dilemma experienced by academics who come to realize that their political, social, and/or ethical beliefs run counter to the status quo maintained by the elite. Should academics perpetuate traditional networks and hope their different opinions will be appear more palatable through association with moderates, or should they find altogether new ways of working? Should they speak out and risk being ostracized by their professional community, or take that chance and turn their practices of research and analysis into active resistance? What’s at stake and is it worth it? Featuring: * Kelly Gorkoff, Instructor, Criminal Justice Department discussing the neoliberalization of higher education * Christopher Leo, Professor, Department of Politics revealing barriers in academic publishing * Vesna Milosevic-Zdjelar, Instructor, Department of Physics addressing biases in educational curriculum * Brock Pitawanakwat, Asst. Professor, Aboriginal Governance Program commenting on abuses of power within the academy Winnipeg-based curator and writer, Milena Placentile, will moderate this conversation. Extended biographies and summaries of each presentation can be found online: http://gallery1c03.blogspot.com/2009/10/academic-freedom-conversation-about-way.html

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                • Academic Freedom? A conversation about the way things are and the way things could be… (1/4)

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                  Documentation of panel discussion and open conversation hosted on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 from 7 - 9 p.m in Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall at the University of Winnipeg. This event was open and free for all; the promotional text was as follows: In light of recent scandals around the world involving academics being served cease and desist notices for producing valid research challenging corporate activity, being arrested under suspicion of terrorism, or losing tenure without due process as a clear response to different ways of thinking and teaching, it is a ripe moment to discuss intellectual and ethical integrity vis-à-vis academic freedom in the context of societal expectations. Academics are perceived as belonging to a certain social and intellectual "class". In what ways can they gravitate toward a genuinely ethical definition of their profession while confronting the influences that expect them to toe the line in order to maintain status? With a view to opening discussion on this subject, four University of Winnipeg faculty members have been invited to express perspectives concerning the dilemma experienced by academics who come to realize that their political, social, and/or ethical beliefs run counter to the status quo maintained by the elite. Should academics perpetuate traditional networks and hope their different opinions will be appear more palatable through association with moderates, or should they find altogether new ways of working? Should they speak out and risk being ostracized by their professional community, or take that chance and turn their practices of research and analysis into active resistance? What’s at stake and is it worth it? Featuring: * Kelly Gorkoff, Instructor, Criminal Justice Department discussing the neoliberalization of higher education * Christopher Leo, Professor, Department of Politics revealing barriers in academic publishing * Vesna Milosevic-Zdjelar, Instructor, Department of Physics addressing biases in educational curriculum * Brock Pitawanakwat, Asst. Professor, Aboriginal Governance Program commenting on abuses of power within the academy Winnipeg-based curator and writer, Milena Placentile, will moderate this conversation. Extended biographies and summaries of each presentation can be found online: http://gallery1c03.blogspot.com/2009/10/academic-freedom-conversation-about-way.html

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                  • Academic Freedom? A conversation about the way things are and the way things could be… (4/4)

                    28:30

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                    Documentation of panel discussion and open conversation hosted on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 from 7:00 - 9:00 p.m in Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall at the University of Winnipeg. This event was open and free for all; the promotional text was as follows: In light of recent scandals around the world involving academics being served cease and desist notices for producing valid research challenging corporate activity, being arrested under suspicion of terrorism, or losing tenure without due process as a clear response to different ways of thinking and teaching, it is a ripe moment to discuss intellectual and ethical integrity vis-à-vis academic freedom in the context of societal expectations. Academics are perceived as belonging to a certain social and intellectual "class". In what ways can they gravitate toward a genuinely ethical definition of their profession while confronting the influences that expect them to toe the line in order to maintain status? With a view to opening discussion on this subject, four University of Winnipeg faculty members have been invited to express perspectives concerning the dilemma experienced by academics who come to realize that their political, social, and/or ethical beliefs run counter to the status quo maintained by the elite. Should academics perpetuate traditional networks and hope their different opinions will be appear more palatable through association with moderates, or should they find altogether new ways of working? Should they speak out and risk being ostracized by their professional community, or take that chance and turn their practices of research and analysis into active resistance? What’s at stake and is it worth it? Featuring: * Kelly Gorkoff, Instructor, Criminal Justice Department discussing the neoliberalization of higher education * Christopher Leo, Professor, Department of Politics revealing barriers in academic publishing * Vesna Milosevic-Zdjelar, Instructor, Department of Physics addressing biases in educational curriculum * Brock Pitawanakwat, Asst. Professor, Aboriginal Governance Program commenting on abuses of power within the academy Winnipeg-based curator and writer, Milena Placentile, will moderate this conversation. Extended biographies and summaries of each presentation can be found online: http://gallery1c03.blogspot.com/2009/10/academic-freedom-conversation-about-way.html

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                    • Academic Freedom? A conversation about the way things are and the way things could be… (3/4)

                      29:22

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                      Documentation of panel discussion and open conversation hosted on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 from 7:00 - 9:00 p.m in Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall at the University of Winnipeg. This event was open and free for all; the promotional text was as follows: In light of recent scandals around the world involving academics being served cease and desist notices for producing valid research challenging corporate activity, being arrested under suspicion of terrorism, or losing tenure without due process as a clear response to different ways of thinking and teaching, it is a ripe moment to discuss intellectual and ethical integrity vis-à-vis academic freedom in the context of societal expectations. Academics are perceived as belonging to a certain social and intellectual "class". In what ways can they gravitate toward a genuinely ethical definition of their profession while confronting the influences that expect them to toe the line in order to maintain status? With a view to opening discussion on this subject, four University of Winnipeg faculty members have been invited to express perspectives concerning the dilemma experienced by academics who come to realize that their political, social, and/or ethical beliefs run counter to the status quo maintained by the elite. Should academics perpetuate traditional networks and hope their different opinions will be appear more palatable through association with moderates, or should they find altogether new ways of working? Should they speak out and risk being ostracized by their professional community, or take that chance and turn their practices of research and analysis into active resistance? What’s at stake and is it worth it? Featuring: * Kelly Gorkoff, Instructor, Criminal Justice Department discussing the neoliberalization of higher education * Christopher Leo, Professor, Department of Politics revealing barriers in academic publishing * Vesna Milosevic-Zdjelar, Instructor, Department of Physics addressing biases in educational curriculum * Brock Pitawanakwat, Asst. Professor, Aboriginal Governance Program commenting on abuses of power within the academy Winnipeg-based curator and writer, Milena Placentile, will moderate this conversation. Extended biographies and summaries of each presentation can be found online: http://gallery1c03.blogspot.com/2009/10/academic-freedom-conversation-about-way.html

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