1. Canon 7D movie - Another night in Beijing

    03:04

    from Dan Chung Added 381K 1,218 96

    So here is my first attempt at filming with a production Canon Eos7D just one hour after receiving it from my local camera store. Starting at 10pm I spent about 2 hours in total filming this an the Nanluoguxiang Hutong in Beijing which is popular with locals and tourists alike. Due to the lack of light its shot mostly at around 1600 to 6400 ISO. Lenses were the Canon 50mm f1.2L, 35mm f1.4L and the 70-200mm f4L IS. I attached my Zacuto Z-finder straight to the camera, then added a prototype of the new Genus d-slr bars supporting their wide angle mattebox to prevent any excess lens flare. I shot mostly handheld using a small Redrockmicro shoulder rig at times as well as on my fantastic Miller DS-20 tripod. Audio was from a Zoom H4n feeding the camera audio directly using a custom cable from Pinknoise systems (living with AGC to speed time in the edit). For more detail go to www.dslrnewsshooter.com

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    • Jonah M. Kessel Showreel 2011: China, Tibet, Nepal, India, The Philippines

      03:37

      from Jonah Kessel Added 12K 165 21

      Mixed video footage from 2011 assignments in China, Tibet, Nepal, India and the Philippines. More photography from these areas at www.jonahkessel.com and blog.jonahkessel.com.

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      • The Fate of Old Beijing: CH. 1 - A Disappearing World

        05:45

        from Jonah Kessel Added 7,476 49 4

        A Disappearing World, is part one of the three-part series "The Fate of Old Beijing: The Vanishing Hutongs." In the face of China’s rapid modernization, the world’s most populous country is struggling to preserve its cultural heritage, and nowhere is this more visible than in the ancient alleyways and courtyards of Beijing. Once a ubiquitous feature of Beijing, the hutongs are more than simply housing; they are actually a way of life. Entire families live in single, crowded courtyards, often with no bathrooms. Yet despite the lack of modern amenities, the communal aspect to life within the hutongs means that few want to leave – even as their neighbourhoods are being demolished and redeveloped. UNESCO estimates that more than 88 percent of the city’s old residential quarters are already gone, most torn down in the last three decades. In a three-part series, filmmakers Jonah Kessel and Kit Gillet explore the vanishing world of Beijing’s hutongs, the realities of life within the narrow streets, and the future for these culturally-irreplaceable areas of China’s capital. CHAPTER ONE: For many residents, hutong life is all they have ever known, and their memories and lives are intertwined strongly with the old streets and alleyways. Yet as time has gone by, many of the courtyards have become overcrowded and the buildings themselves have deteriorated. Despite the cultural heritage of the hutongs thousands of them have been razed in the past decades to make way for urban development destroying centuries of history and contributing to the shrinking of the remaining hutong space.

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        • The Fate of Old Beijing: The Vanishing Hutongs

          19:46

          from Jonah Kessel Added 1,967 24 7

          In the face of China’s rapid modernization, the world’s most populous country is struggling to preserve its cultural heritage, and nowhere is this more visible than in the ancient alleyways and courtyards of Beijing. Once a ubiquitous feature of Beijing, the hutongs are more than simply housing; they are actually a way of life. Entire families live in single, crowded courtyards, often with no bathrooms. Yet despite the lack of modern amenities, the communal aspect to life within the hutongs means that few want to leave – even as their neighbourhoods are being demolished and redeveloped. UNESCO estimates that more than 88 percent of the city’s old residential quarters are already gone, most torn down in the last three decades. -- This video has also been split into three smaller parts that can be viewed independently here: CHAPTER ONE - A Disappearing World: http://vimeo.com/19122141 For many residents, hutong life is all they have ever known, and their memories and lives are intertwined strongly with the old streets and alleyways. Yet as time has gone by, many of the courtyards have become overcrowded and the buildings themselves have deteriorated. Despite the cultural heritage of the hutongs thousands of them have been razed in the past decades to make way for urban development destroying centuries of history and contributing to the shrinking of the remaining hutong space. CHAPTER TWO — David vs. Goliath - http://vimeo.com/19324494: While hutong residents may not have the easiest lives, few want to leave the streets and alleyways they have long called home. However, with China’s current legal system offering few avenues of discourse it is hard for residents to save their homes after they have been slated for demolition. Some are torn down to make way for new subway lines but, increasingly, a large number are simply torn down to be replaced by large high rise buildings that primarily benefit the land developers and local officials. CHAPTER THREE — Beyond the Alleys: http://vimeo.com/19341584 If Beijing’s hutong areas are to be retained in one form or another, decisions need to be made about whether to invest money in keeping the original structures or replacing them with replicas built in the same style but offering modern amenities – a move that many suggest destroys the soul of the buildings. While for former hutong residents forced or happily leaving their old homes, a new way of life beckons. For more information on this project visit: http://blog.jonahkessel.com/the-fate-of-old-beijing/

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          • OFF CANVAS - Ying Yonghui

            02:55

            from Studio Stare Added 686 18 0

            In October 2011, Converse proposed an unconventional approach to support China's first-ever Design Week launching in Beijing. Converse created "OFF CANVAS", a street-level exhibition of typography featuring six international and local artists notorious for their artistry of words. Culling from the diverse worlds of graphic design, art, and graffiti, the installations revealed communities and canvases where China’s emerging scenes in indie music, art, fashion and skate are based. Ying Yonghui is celebrated as of of the industry's foremost typography designers and researches. His piece "Play" is a literal name for an abstraction of nostalgic traditions of Beijing, captured in type.

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            • The Fate of Old Beijing: CH. 2 - David vs. Goliath

              06:52

              from Jonah Kessel Added 3,274 17 3

              David vs. Goliath, is part two of the three-part series "The Fate of Old Beijing: The Vanishing Hutongs." In the face of China’s rapid modernization, the world’s most populous country is struggling to preserve its cultural heritage, and nowhere is this more visible than in the ancient alleyways and courtyards of Beijing. Once a ubiquitous feature of Beijing, the hutongs are more than simply housing; they are actually a way of life. Entire families live in single, crowded courtyards, often with no bathrooms. Yet despite the lack of modern amenities, the communal aspect to life within the hutongs means that few want to leave – even as their neighbourhoods are being demolished and redeveloped. UNESCO estimates that more than 88 percent of the city’s old residential quarters are already gone, most torn down in the last three decades. In a three-part series, filmmakers Jonah Kessel and Kit Gillet explore the vanishing world of Beijing’s hutongs, the realities of life within the narrow streets, and the future for these culturally-irreplaceable areas of China’s capital. CHAPTER TWO: While hutong residents may not have the easiest lives, few want to leave the streets and alleyways they have long called home. However, with China’s current legal system offering few avenues of discourse it is hard for residents to save their homes after they have been slated for demolition. Some are torn down to make way for new subway lines but, increasingly, a large number are simply torn down to be replaced by large high rise buildings that primarily benefit the land developers and local officials.

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              • Glimpses of Beijing

                05:00

                from tofu 4 fun Added

                A taxi ride, a subway ride, a few strolls on foot and a ride in a "took took"... but you will have to watch until the end to know what's that like in Beijing :) A bit of everything Beijing in November, on the cold side as you will notice seeing how wrapped people are but under an unrelenting and beautifully bright sunshine.

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                • Beijing Jiaozi

                  01:00

                  from Berlin Brooklyn Added

                  Jiaozi in a Bejing hutong. Directed by Mani Bakhshpour

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                  • Intersection Beijing: New Style in Old Beijing

                    03:29

                    from Jonah Kessel Added 1,023 12 0

                    The The New York Times fashion feature "Intersection" comes to Beijing. This section looks at street styles at one intersection of a neighborhood. This series has mostly been in the US and Europe thus far, but now is expanding into Asia. Beijing's Gulou neighborhood was once home to the royal elite, politicians and emperors. But today the old alleys and traditional courtyards are home to hipsters, hooligans, hippies — and of course, Chinese people that have watched their neighborhood transform into a lively region, filled with hidden bars, restaurants and cultural gems. For those not wanting to read subtitles, feel free to visit New York Times version of this video, with voice overs: nyti.ms/18iRQpY

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                    • The Fate of Old Beijing: CH. 3 - Beyond the Alleys

                      07:45

                      from Jonah Kessel Added 1,953 12 4

                      Beyond the Alleys, is part three of the three-part series "The Fate of Old Beijing: The Vanishing Hutongs." In the face of China’s rapid modernization, the world’s most populous country is struggling to preserve its cultural heritage, and nowhere is this more visible than in the ancient alleyways and courtyards of Beijing. Once a ubiquitous feature of Beijing, the hutongs are more than simply housing; they are actually a way of life. Entire families live in single, crowded courtyards, often with no bathrooms. Yet despite the lack of modern amenities, the communal aspect to life within the hutongs means that few want to leave – even as their neighbourhoods are being demolished and redeveloped. UNESCO estimates that more than 88 percent of the city’s old residential quarters are already gone, most torn down in the last three decades. In a three-part series, filmmakers Jonah Kessel and Kit Gillet explore the vanishing world of Beijing’s hutongs, the realities of life within the narrow streets, and the future for these culturally-irreplaceable areas of China’s capital. CHAPTER THREE: If Beijing’s hutong areas are to be retained in one form or another, decisions need to be made about whether to invest money in keeping the original structures or replacing them with replicas built in the same style but offering modern amenities – a move that many suggest destroys the soul of the buildings. While for former hutong residents forced or happily leaving their old homes, a new way of life beckons.

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