1. CLIPS: MOLLY MURPHY & NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON ON OUR LAST DAY ON EARTH

    06:59

    from Incubator Arts Project / Added

    Molly Murphy And Neil deGrasse Tyson On Our Last Day On Earth is an experimental adventure cabaret about the famous astrophysicist, Neil de Grasse Tyson and his biggest fan, a fictional character named Molly Murphy. It's the last day on Earth. Our solar system is about to get sucked into a super massive black hole. Molly Murphy decides today is the day she must meet her hero, so she marches down to the Hayden Planetarium in New York City to find Dr. Tyson and have him fulfill her lifetime dream of being a space tourist. Original music by Loren Beri of Met City.

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    • CLIP: NEAR VICKSBURG

      07:12

      from Incubator Arts Project / Added

      MARCH 6 - 16 Near Vicksburg is set in the Civil War during Siege of Vicksburg. On May 18th, 1863 Union troops (or “Feds”) fell upon the river city of Vicksburg, MS and fought for it until July 4th, a total of 47 days. To escape the relentless artillery fire, mortar attacks and bombardments, the citizens of Vicksburg, mostly women, children and soon-to-be-former slaves, dug and hid in a series of 500 caves in the hills and bluffs of the city. The play is about three completely powerless people hiding in one of these caves: Jane, a middle class Southern woman, her husband's slave, George, and Jane's teenaged daughter. As the war rages only inches away from them, Jane and George create their own version of society in the claustrophobic cave, with its own set of rules, boundaries, language and physicality. Playwright/Director: Sara Farrington Set/Lighting Designer: Cecilia Durbin Sound Designer: Juan Aboites Stage Manager: Stacy Arnaiz Performers: Megan Emery Gaffney, Ugo Chukwu, Zoe Van Tieghem, Chris Michael Burke

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      • CLIP: NEAR VICKSBURG

        15:53

        from Incubator Arts Project / Added

        MARCH 6 - 16 Near Vicksburg is set in the Civil War during Siege of Vicksburg. On May 18th, 1863 Union troops (or “Feds”) fell upon the river city of Vicksburg, MS and fought for it until July 4th, a total of 47 days. To escape the relentless artillery fire, mortar attacks and bombardments, the citizens of Vicksburg, mostly women, children and soon-to-be-former slaves, dug and hid in a series of 500 caves in the hills and bluffs of the city. The play is about three completely powerless people hiding in one of these caves: Jane, a middle class Southern woman, her husband's slave, George, and Jane's teenaged daughter. As the war rages only inches away from them, Jane and George create their own version of society in the claustrophobic cave, with its own set of rules, boundaries, language and physicality. Playwright/Director: Sara Farrington Set/Lighting Designer: Cecilia Durbin Sound Designer: Juan Aboites Stage Manager: Stacy Arnaiz Performers: Megan Emery Gaffney, Ugo Chukwu, Zoe Van Tieghem, Chris Michael Burke

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        • CLIP: NEAR VICKSBURG

          07:38

          from Incubator Arts Project / Added

          MARCH 6 - 16 Near Vicksburg is set in the Civil War during Siege of Vicksburg. On May 18th, 1863 Union troops (or “Feds”) fell upon the river city of Vicksburg, MS and fought for it until July 4th, a total of 47 days. To escape the relentless artillery fire, mortar attacks and bombardments, the citizens of Vicksburg, mostly women, children and soon-to-be-former slaves, dug and hid in a series of 500 caves in the hills and bluffs of the city. The play is about three completely powerless people hiding in one of these caves: Jane, a middle class Southern woman, her husband's slave, George, and Jane's teenaged daughter. As the war rages only inches away from them, Jane and George create their own version of society in the claustrophobic cave, with its own set of rules, boundaries, language and physicality. Playwright/Director: Sara Farrington Set/Lighting Designer: Cecilia Durbin Sound Designer: Juan Aboites Stage Manager: Stacy Arnaiz Performers: Megan Emery Gaffney, Ugo Chukwu, Zoe Van Tieghem, Chris Michael Burke

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          • "the.humanest" - 10 minute reel

            09:09

            from Peter Musante / Added

            109 Plays / / 0 Comments

            The life and legacy of enigmatic mathematician, code-breaker and pioneer of artificial intelligence Alan Turing provoke a multidisciplinary examination of the paradoxical, often binary, relationship between authenticity & performance. The theater is transformed into the site of a unique form of Turing Test (which tests a computer’s ability to convincingly imitate human intelligence) where audience become judges and six participants compete over three rounds of “conversation” that invoke Turing’s story. Driven by the participants’ individual quests for aliveness on stage, “the.humanest” pairs a variety of performance strategies with the niche pageantry of competitions such as the coveted Loebner Prize for Artificial Intelligence for a wholly original theatrical experiment that playfully interrogates what it means to be human. Developed by the participants: Sabrina Jacob, Drew Madland, Kaija Matiss, Corinne Robkin, Raphael Shapiro and Summer Shapiro Sound/Music Direction: Sean Brennan Video/Lights: Simon Harding Scenic Design: Mary Olin Geiger Vocal Arrangements: Paul Peglar Documentation video: Eva Von Schweinitz & Jim Moore Photography: Jim Moore/Vaudevisuals.com Conceived and Directed by Peter Musante at Incubator Arts Project Friday November 8th @ 8pm Saturday November 9th @ 2:30pm Saturday November 9th @ 8pm Sunday November 10th @ 8pm Promotional Material link to promo vid 1 (cleverbot): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHmqaYAjRkM link to promo vid 2 (dance): http://vimeo.com/77763019 Peter interviewed about Alan Turing: https://vimeo.com/79141283 Wall text (hung inside the lobby installation): the.humanest is based on the premise that the theater is a unique form of “turing test”. in 1950, Alan Turing posed the question “can machines think?” and proposed a test to determine if they can. Today we have niche competitions such as “the Loebner Prize for Artificial Intelligence” which seek to answer Turing’s call by bringing together “chatbots”, such as “Cleverbot” and ordinary humans to see if the computers can convince us that they’re real people. Judges communicate with two anonymous entities via chat, one a human the other an AI program. After five minutes the judge must decide which is more human. the.humanest asks the same question in a new way. Instead of Turing’s prescribed five minute chat with two entities, judges of the.humanest witness five scenes carried out in two different ways. Performers create scenes as “conversation points” meant to reveal a particular quality of humanness (mimicry, logic, code, selfhood and "the end" [mortality] ) and have two opportunities do so using two contrasting performance strategies of their choice (improvisation, choreography, chance operations, etc). Instead of comparing performers to computers, the.humanest implores participants to boldly experiment with ways to feel alive onstage, then ask a panel of peers to determine which was most convincing.

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            • CLIP: REQUIEM FOR BLACK MARIE

              02:57

              from Incubator Arts Project / Added

              Requiem For Black Marie is a wild and darkly funny imagining of the sexual and creative politics of the Brecht Machine during the Weimar Republic (1919-1933) period in Berlin. The play is Farrington's interpretation of playwright Bertolt Brecht’s collaboration with his many lovers, specifically, Elisabeth Hauptmann and Margarete Steffin, in the years leading up to the Brecht team fleeing Germany in 1933. The play rejects the commonly taken position that Brecht villainously stole from his female collaborators, but rather that the women were complicit in giving their work over to him, which led to miserable, lonely and, worst of all, anonymous lives for both women. A live band and original score (composed and performed by the St. Fortune Theater Collective), coupled with stark shadow imagery and video drive the story aesthetically. Written by Sara Farrington Stage Manager: R.S. Buck Directed by Shannon Sindelar Set and lighting design by Cecilia Durbin Video design by Reid Farrington Costume Design by Meriwether Snipes Original score by the St. Fortune Theater Collective Performed by: Caleb Hammond, Erin Mallon, Megan Emery Gaffney, Jocelyn Kuritsky, Wil Petre, Michelle Veintimilla, Yuki Kawahisa, Tatiana Gomberg, Natalie Mack, John Gasper and Gavin Price

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              • IAP 2012-2013 INTERVIEWS // Andrew Scoville & Dave Tennent

                07:31

                from Incubator Arts Project / Added

                Utilizing his ongoing work with unconventional theatrical uses for commercial technology, Andrew Scoville premieres his three part theatrical event that explores the human desire to create life from machinery.

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                • IAP 2012-2013 INTERVIEWS // Hybrid Stage Project

                  07:26

                  from Incubator Arts Project / Added

                  Esoteric rituals, alchemical formulas, messages of the dead, unencrypted ciphers, and a visceral exploration of color theory weave their way across the terrain of the stage. The Red Book investigates the invisible momentum of the psyche, ritualistic gesticulation patterns, poetry of space, mirrors and mazes, ecstatic forms of spoken word, color and reflection. Enantiodromia suggests that the excess of any force inevitably produces its opposite. This coincidence of opposites and the confrontation of dual, dueling forces within the human psyche may lead us into the missing third, which forces itself to be sensed and expressed before words, beyond speech, beyond the medium that incarnates the act. In The Red Book, Peker and Wallace continue their investigation of intricately crafted, rigorous, physical forms and vocal structures. Melding their fiercely expressionistic aesthetic with meticulously configured phenomenological structures, The Hybrid Stage Project puts its unconscious on trial and you are invited to the ritual. Co-director, writer, performer: Fulya Peker Co-director, writer, performer: Deborah Wallace Choreography: Akiko Aizawa http://incubatorarts.org/redbook2013.html

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                  • Vaudevisuals Interview with ANIMALS Performance Group - "The Tommy" Award Winners 2013

                    07:02

                    from Jim Moore / Added

                    63 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Sitting in the Dixon Place theater interviewing the "Tommy Award" winning performance trio ANIMALS about their work and how they met. Great fun! ANIMALS is Nikki Calonge, Michael De Angelis and Mike Mikos. Their work includes dance, video, puppetry and crafted objects to serve elements of surprise, cultural exchange and irreverence to create moments that question the flexibility of the world and the nature of humans through instinct, ability and play. ANIMALS has performed at the Bushwick Starr, Invisible Dog, Dixon Place, Three-Legged Dog Art and Technology Center and Incubator Arts Project. Interview shot by Jim Moore at Dixon Place, NYC. Interview originally posted at: http://vaudevisuals.com For more information on ANIMALS: http://www.bearelephantibex.com/ For information on THE TOMMY AWARDS: http://bit.ly/XpPE7G

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                    • IAP 2012-2013 INTERVIEWS // Katherine Brook

                      07:40

                      from Incubator Arts Project / Added

                      Lady Han is a post-Christmas-nearly-Valentine’s-Day, distinctly American take on a classical Noh drama about a prostitute going mad with loneliness. With a skeleton faithfully based on the 15th century Japanese play by Zeami, and flesh that is all All-American, Lady Han is an entirely focused and otherworldly 20th century spin on a classic Noh play. Lady Han is a story of a prostitute who falls in love with a client, Yoshida, and pines for him all Fall and Winter. When he returns she has already gone mad and doesn’t recognize him. Using this poetic text and the conventions of classical Japanese drama, the production aims to lift our own culture — denim, Dolly, shopping carts, line dancing, plastic Christmas trees — to the height of elegance. In a time of manic, maximalist, fast and furious entertainment, the piece takes audiences down an alternate path to use the theatre as a place of contemplation and focus, attempting to slow down our minds and explore the beauty and sadness in contemporary American popular culture. The bold production presents white-hot passion and sorrow with careful restraint and formality utilizing the tools of precise audio and production design. The driving force in this piece — as in traditional Noh — is the live music, which is composed by Taylor Brook, and features banjo, vocals and electronics. Composer and Sound Designer: Taylor Brook Set Designer: Josh Smith Costume Designer: Ryan Park Lighting Designer: Ken Wills Choreographer: Katie Rose McLaughlin Stage-Manager: Hannah Johnson-Walsh Performers: Jessie Shelton, Andrew Dinwiddie, Louisa Bradshaw, Brighid Greene, Nicolas Norena, Lena Moy-Borgen, David Gould, Alex Mallett, Ethan Fishbane Text by Zeami, translated by Royall Tyler http://www.incubatorarts.org/ladyhan2013.html

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