1. REDCAR Colloquium Session Two: The Overlay

    02:32:17

    from Tyrone Marshall Added 101 0 0

    REDCAR Colloquium September 25, 2010 California College of the Arts (CCA) | Timken Hall San Francisco, California Rethinking Urban Transportation: New Strategies for Mobility Many metropolitan areas continue to experience rapid growth, with some like Los Angeles receiving up to 500 new residents each day. One of the current challenges for expanding cities is the design of a flexible transportation infrastructure that can respond to an ever increasing demand on resources and systems; one that is contained within the vision of a socially equitable and sustainable society. This mode of infrastructural response necessitates a rethinking of traditional personal mobility strategies. The colloquium served as a vehicle to examine innovative transportation solutions in a systemic manner so as to address the reality of a typical North American polycentric metropolitan area. Instead of examining solutions that apply to idealized (but non-existent) urban centers, this colloquium embraces the contemporary condition — the messy, chaotic, politically and socially balkanized, poly-centric metropolis. By exploring current technologies, as well as those which have reached a high degree of feasibility, this interdisciplinary colloquium will explore the potential of an ubiquitous self-regulating system that can cope with and adapt to the unpredictability of a mobile society. New Strategies for Mobility - Rethinking Urban Transportation Session 2 – the overlay – explores the possibilities of how the urban realm will be transformed and how urban planning and infrastructure will react/respond. The extent of this exploration would include the varying effects to the built realm, social networks, real estate speculation, architectural response, and morphing of infrastructure. This session discusses the design implication of autonomous transit on the built & social environments. Urban development will naturally emerge around social activity hotspots. The overlay of route-processing software upon the physical realm will cause serendipitous social and transit “hot-spots” to emerge thus creating an organic evolution of true TODs. With “REDCAR-like” applications downloadable to personal communication devices, transit options will be integrated into and tailored to a users’ personal daily tasks and social interactions. Transit will adapt you and not the other way around. Introduction by Mona El Khafif Moderator: Mona El Khafif / CCA Speakers: Therese Tierney /UIUC – Understanding the public realm: Application of Social Networking Christine Outram / MIT SENSEable City Lab Ken Greenberg / Greenberg Consultants – Urban Design Implications: Will it work? Cathy Simon / Perkins+Will – Organic vs. deterministic: Do we loose control? Peter Albert / SF MTA – Reality Check: Hey this is my town you’re talking about! Conclusion: Ila Berman / CCA The REDCAR Colloquium team: Gerry Tierney (510 Collective) Dinesh Perera (Format Design Studio) Ben Feldmann (510 Collective) Therese Tierney (TT Studio) Katie Handy (Format Design Studio) Tyrone Marshall (510 Collective) Ned Reifenstein (510 Collective) Generously made possible by: The Architects Newspaper California College of the Arts Field Paoli Perkins+Will The colloquium is also a public program of American Institute of Architects San Francisco Chapter 'Architecture and the City Festival' for 2010. aiasf.org

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    • Eyal Weizman: The Least of All Possible Evils - Part 1

      02:13:34

      from The Center for the Humanities Added 241 3 0

      How do spatial and visual practices intersect critically with philosophical concerns for human rights and the discourse of humanitarianism? On the occasion of the exhibition Common Assembly by DAAR—Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency in the James Gallery and the publication of his book The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza(Verso), Eyal Weizman will conduct a seminar in two parts. First, Weizman will lecture on Palestine and DAAR’s practice, which proposes the subversion, reuse, profanation and recycling of the existing infrastructure of a colonial occupation. This will be followed by a conversation with Tom Keenan about how to think and act propositionally about human rights, right of return, and common claims, as well as sovereignty and territorialization today. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Humanities, the Mellon Committee on the Study of Globalization and Social Change at the CUNY Graduate Center.

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      • PIPELINE - June 1, 2015

        02:10:27

        from Dedham Television Added 93 0 0

        Board of Selectmen for the Town of Dedham Massachusetts hosts an informational meeting for the town residents to discuss safety issues and other concerns about the proposed 'West Roxbury Lateral Project' (A.K.A. 'The Algonquin Pipeline Project'). Selectmen Dennis Teehan provides a status report on the project. Visit: https://www.facebook.com/Dedhamneedstoknow for more information concerning the proposed project.

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        • Electric Transmission 201: The High - Voltage Grid: Its Operations, Challenges, and Benefits

          02:02:45

          from EESIonline Added 15 0 0

          Learn more and download slides at: http://www.eesi.org/032614transmission The Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) and WIRES held a briefing on the modernization of the nation's critical network of high-voltage transmission. Speakers for this forum were: Laura Manz, Executive Consultant, Smart Wire Grid Download Laura Manz's slides http://files.eesi.org/LauraManz032614... Judy Chang, Principal, The Brattle Group Download Judy Chang's slides http://files.eesi.org/JudyChang032614... Jeff Dennis, Director of Policy Development at the Office of Energy Policy & Innovation, FERC Download Jeff Dennis's slides http://files.eesi.org/JeffDennis03261... Kevin Reeves, Managing Director Energy Trading & Marketing, American Electric Power Download Kevin Reeves's slides http://files.eesi.org/KevinReeves0326... Jack Halpern, Power Sector Leader for Environmental Services, Stantec Download Jack Halpern's slides http://files.eesi.org/JackHalpern0326... Dan Belin, Director of Electric Transmission, Ecology & Environment Inc. Download Dan Belin's slides http://files.eesi.org/DanielBelin0326... Moderator: James Hoecker, former FERC Chairman; WIRES Counsel, Husch Blackwell LLP Download James Hoecker's slides http://files.eesi.org/JimHoecker03261... Designed and built well before the digital age to serve more localized customer loads, the "grid" is struggling to support active and increasingly competitive wholesale power markets that now operate regionally. It is often congested or inadequate to deliver domestic energy resources that are not close to customers. Its aging facilities have acknowledged weather and cyber vulnerabilities. Moreover, the planning and regulation of this fundamental infrastructure is complex, often uncoordinated, and slow to produce results. However, despite the combined effects of the recession and greater energy efficiency, the grid will be called upon to serve 30 percent more electrical demand over the next two decades. Modern transmission is the fundamental enabler of competition, new technologies, and our high standard of living. Upgrading and expanding the system is a priority. Transmission 201 provided a basic understanding of how the high-voltage system works and then moved to key issues affecting the grid: economic regulation; actual siting and permitting of the facilities; the regional markets that transmission supports; and the range of diverse economic, environmental, and operational benefits that transmission provides to the whole electric system and electricity consumers.

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          • REDCAR Colloquium Session One: The System

            02:01:21

            from Tyrone Marshall Added 70 0 0

            REDCAR Colloquium September 25, 2010 California College of the Arts (CCA) | Timken Hall San Francisco, California Rethinking Urban Transportation: New Strategies for Mobility Many metropolitan areas continue to experience rapid growth, with some like Los Angeles receiving up to 500 new residents each day. One of the current challenges for expanding cities is the design of a flexible transportation infrastructure that can respond to an ever increasing demand on resources and systems; one that is contained within the vision of a socially equitable and sustainable society. This mode of infrastructural response necessitates a rethinking of traditional personal mobility strategies. The colloquium served as a vehicle to examine innovative transportation solutions in a systemic manner so as to address the reality of a typical North American polycentric metropolitan area. Instead of examining solutions that apply to idealized (but non-existent) urban centers, this colloquium embraces the contemporary condition — the messy, chaotic, politically and socially balkanized, poly-centric metropolis. By exploring current technologies, as well as those which have reached a high degree of feasibility, this interdisciplinary colloquium will explore the potential of an ubiquitous self-regulating system that can cope with and adapt to the unpredictability of a mobile society. New Strategies for Mobility - Rethinking Urban Transportation Session 1 – the system – looks at coupling smart P2P (person to person) communication technologies with the anticipated progression of smart, clean automated vehicles to augment existing transportation networks providing a sustainable and socially networked solution to mobility for urban contexts. This session will present an overview of the latest research in transportation engineering technologies. It will focus on the “hardware” components of the concept, principally the reinvented ecologically sustainable automobile, running on an automated adaptation of existing freeway infrastructure, as well as an autonomous vehicle guidance system allowing safer navigation of the existing street systems. Introduction by Ila Berman and Gerry Tierney Keynote by Chris Borroni-Bird Moderator: Ila Berman / CCA Speakers: Jim Misener /UCB PATH Sven Beiker / Stanford CARS Chris Borroni-Bird / Director GM Ken Goldberg / UCB CITRIS The REDCAR Colloquium team: Gerry Tierney (510 Collective) Dinesh Perera (Format Design Studio) Ben Feldmann (510 Collective) Therese Tierney (TT Studio) Katie Handy (Format Design Studio) Tyrone Marshall (510 Collective) Ned Reifenstein (510 Collective) Generously made possible by: The Architects Newspaper California College of the Arts Field Paoli Perkins+Will The colloquium is also a public program of American Institute of Architects San Francisco Chapter 'Architecture and the City Festival' for 2010. www.aiasf.org For more information please go to our website at www.mobilityandthecity.com

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            • IP30 Infrastructure Delivery Innovation Series Panel - the opportunity for governance.

              01:58:21

              from The Warren Centre Added 0 0 0

              This panel continues The Warren Centre's journey of identifying the critical issues and opportunities for industry and government to bring transformational change and lasting improvement to infrastructure delivery. The panel, moderated by The Warren Centre’s Alex Harrington, features: * Mark Smith, Transport for NSW * Garry Bowditch, SMART Infrastructure * Suresh Cuganesan, John Grill Centre for Project Leadership

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              • freethought invites... Jan Verwoert: What Forces Us to Go into Abstraction

                01:53:00

                from Bergen Assembly Added 28 0 0

                freethought invites.... Jan Verwoert: What Forces Us to Go into Abstraction Thursday 11 June 2015, Hordaland Kunstsenter, Bergen. Why do things work the way they do? Is it because people shape places? So there wouldn't be a single city, institution or social structure on the planet which wasn't a product of how people perform whatever they think is the right thing to do and life in the polis would be defined by forces that are infinitely specific. Or is it never about people but first and foremost about (super- and infra-) structures? How else could you explain that a sheer accumulation of power and money can create realities which have nothing to do with people, which are abstract beyond belief because they are manifestations of structural plotting alone, but which shape life in the city with the physical force of a slap in the face? Do we want to look closely at how people perform politics, in the flesh? Or do the structural realities created by superpower and superriches force us to go into abstraction? --- Jan Verwoert is a critic and writer on contemporary art and cultural theory, based in Berlin. He is a contributing editor of Frieze magazine, his writing has appeared in different journals, anthologies and monographs. He teaches at the Piet Zwart Institute Rotterdam, the de Appel curatorial programme and the Oslo National Academy of the Arts. He is the author of Bas Jan Ader: In Search of the Miraculous, MIT Press/Afterall Books 2006, the essay collection Tell Me What You Want What You Really Really Want, Sternberg Press/Piet Zwart Institute 2010, together with Michael Stevenson, Animal Spirits — Fables in the Parlance of Our Time, Christoph Keller Editions, JRP, Zurich 2013 and a second collection of his essays Cookie! published by Sternberg Press/Piet Zwart Institute 2014. ---- freethought invites...is a series of open and free public events organised by freethought for the Bergen Assembly to pursue their collective research into 'Infrastructure'. These events are open to all, and are hosted around dinner, drinks and a guest lecture. ---- Video by Scott Elliott for Bergen Assembly 2016

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                • Missile Crisis Briefing 2009

                  01:47:24

                  from CJHS Added 18 0 0

                  UPDATE: Missile Crisis Briefing 2009 From Israel and Washington D.C. The EMP Catastrophe - Proliferating nuclear threats to the U.S., Israel and other allies Panelists: Frank Gaffney, Major General James "Spider" Marks, (Ret.), Avi Schnurr As terrorist regimes acquire nuclear capability, fears of the devastation wrought by a nuclear attack are on the rise. However, a seldom discussed, yet more insidious threat looms on the horizon - the risk of an Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) attack - a catastrophe that could instantly transform America from a superpower to a pre-industrial society. Such an attack would destroy the U.S. electrical grid and lead to infrastructure failure that would result in food shortages, starvation, disease, and civil unrest. Of course, Israel, Europe, Japan and other countries are equally vulnerable and could suffer severe disruptions to their economic, healthcare and security systems. The Congressional EMP Commission recently released their final report - verifying both the danger and the fact that Israel and the United States have not taken adequate steps to protect themselves from the effects of a nuclear EMP Strike. Further, both countries are priority targets for destruction. June 29, 2009 - Los Angeles, CA

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                  • Road to Resiliency: The State of Recovery, Now and in the Future, with Daniel Zarrilli - 6.11.14

                    01:44:06

                    from Center for Architecture Added

                    "Road to Resiliency" highlights accomplishments and next steps, one year after the release of the Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) report. The update will specifically address projects underway and the immediate future of when and where elements of the SIRR will break ground. The evening will highlight federal, state, and local agency coordination, as well as detail where communities remain at risk. We are honored to have Daniel Zarrilli, NYC Director of Recovery and Resiliency and also acting head of the Mayor’s Office for Long-Term Planning & Sustainability, return to speak to DfRR and the larger design community. John Boulé, Senior Manager for Priority Project Delivery at Parsons Brinckerhoff, will serve as respondent. This program, which marks the third anniversary of the founding of the AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee, is our first annual program to gauge progress towards resiliency, identify opportunities, and clarify what is needed to close the gap between them. Principal Speaker: Daniel Zarrilli, PE, Director , NYC Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency, Acting Director, NYC Mayor's Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability Respondent: John Boulé, PE, Senior Manager for Priority Project Delivery, Parsons Brinckerhoff Welcome: Lance Jay Brown, FAIA, 2014 President, AIANY, and Founding Co-Chair, AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee Introduction: Illya Azaroff, AIA, Founding Co-Chair, AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee Daniel Zarrilli has been appointed by Mayor Bill de Blasio as the Director of the Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency for the City of New York, leading the implementation of A Stronger, More Resilient New York, the City’s efforts to improve resiliency by strengthening coastal protections, upgrading buildings, improving infrastructure, and making neighborhoods safer and more vibrant. He is also serving as the Acting Director of the Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability. Prior to this, he served on the Mayor’s Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency, leading the City’s efforts to develop a comprehensive coastal protection plan for the five boroughs and was named the City’s first Director of Resiliency in June 2013. In a previous role, he was the Senior Vice President for Asset Management at the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC), responsible for maritime assets and operations, including the City's two cruise terminals and numerous other transportation and waterfront assets. Prior to joining NYCEDC, Daniel spent five years with Bechtel Infrastructure Corporation. He is a Professional Engineer in the State of NY and holds an MS in Civil and Environmental Engineering from MIT and a BS in Civil Engineering from Lehigh University. Organized by: AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee

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                    • Electric Transmission 101: How the Grid Works

                      01:41:39

                      from EESIonline Added 32 0 0

                      Learn more and download slides at http://www.eesi.org/070913transmission The Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) and WIRES (Working group for Investment in Reliable and Economic electric Systems) held a briefing about the operational basics of high-voltage transmission to help explain the complex economic and policy challenges facing the grid in the 21st century. By delving into the grid's operation and the interstate markets for bulk power it supports, the briefing was designed to provide a foundation for discussions about cost responsibility, land use issues, transmission planning, integration of variable renewable energy resources, and other issues that are becoming more important to the future of the power industry. Jim Hoecker, Counsel to WIRES and former FERC Chairman, Husch Blackwell LLP (Moderator) Slides: http://files.eesi.org/Jim_Hoecker_070... Wayne Galli, Executive Vice President, Transmission and Technical Services, Clean Line Energy Partners Slides: http://files.eesi.org/Wayne_Galli_070... Jeff Dennis, Director, Division of Policy Development, Office of Energy Policy and Innovation, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Slides: http://files.eesi.org/Jeff_Dennis_070... Jay Caspary, Director of Research and Development and Special Studies, Southwest Power Pool Slides: http://files.eesi.org/Jay_Caspary_070... David Cook, Senior Counsel, North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Slides: http://files.eesi.org/David_Cook__070... Fostering investment in electric transmission infrastructure is among the nation's highest energy priorities as a strong grid facilitates the development of alternative generation resources, is more resistant to storms, lowers electricity costs to consumers, promotes a liquid wholesale power market with minimal congestion and market power, improves reliability and energy security, and advances energy independence overall. Investments in the grid also create good, stateside jobs. The United States is likely to invest more than $300 billion in electric transmission during the next 20 years. The barriers to the further development of transmission capacity have become so highly visible that President Obama released a memorandum on June 7 establishing energy corridors that should facilitate new transmission projects on federal lands. Previously, FERC Order 1000, issued in July 2011, had set out strong steps to promote regional and interregional transmission planning.

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