1. Waqas Khan: Jameel Prize 3

    02:26

    from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

    8,562 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Waqas Khan was born in Akhtarabad, Pakistan. Having trained in the miniature style, he is skilled in the delicate art of printmaking. Using small and precise marks on paper, he creates forms and shapes that seem to extend into infinity. At his studio in Lahore, Khan describes the painstaking process that enables him to create works that evolve from simple dots into patterns and compositions. His drawings are built up from ideas and concepts obtained from Muslim, Hindu and Sufi traditions. Transcription: Each dot, or mark, or line, when they come together it is like making some kind of organic forms - it’s like cells. I am using architecture [ink] too - that’s called rapidograph – and I’m using permanent ink and the paper is a traditional miniature painting paper. The reason of using that paper is because that paper is thick and the archival quality of that paper, and that paper can bear the pressure of both my hands. So I have to hold the pen with two hands and I have to go exactly at the same mark, because I am using permanent ink – it cannot be moved, it cannot be removed. My viewer is very important for me. They should be surprised, they should have some enquiries – like, you know, they want to see it; they want to go close to it. Through my work, I want them to be peaceful for some time. Their head and their heart – like, their whole body should be peaceful for some time and they should remember it.

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    • Nasser Al-Salem: Jameel Prize 3

      02:15

      from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

      2,106 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Nasser Al Salem was born – and lives and works – in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. First and foremost, he is a calligrapher – but one who seeks to re-invent the age-old Islamic technique, exploring its conceptual potential and its relevance to contemporary art. Nasser’s practice is a personal form of devotion, but he also aims to prompt the viewer to question their perception of Arabic calligraphy. Transcription: I try to find meanings behind the content of certain phrases, whether it’s a Quranic verse or any other phrase. I try to look in to the meaning of that sentence, or the words, as the words themselves hold significant meaning. From that point, I work towards the concept of the art piece. When I started to explore or pay more attention to the meaning of the word, I found it lead and directed me towards modernity, because the nature of the word was the concept. The nature of Arabic calligraphy is timeless; it always has been contemporary and modern. The more I can express my idea simply, the closer I get to contemporary calligraphy.

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      • Rahul Jain: Jameel Prize 3

        02:37

        from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

        1,601 Plays / / 1 Comment

        Textile designer and historian Rahul Jain was born – and lives and works– in New Delhi. In 1993, Jain set up ASHA, a workshop of traditional Indian drawlooms in Varanasi. ASHA weaves patterned samite, lampas, double-cloth and velvet textiles, modelled on Indian, Iranian, and Turkish fabrics. ASHA's woven images, motifs, and textures are inspired by Mughal, Safavid and Ottoman silks, and are made in pure silk, gold and silver. As a centuries-old Indo-Iranian art nears extinction, Jain discusses the importance of continuing this ancient craft today, and his fascination with the materials. Transcription: You know I’ve always been interested in textiles that start loosing their textile quality, their fibre like quality and start encroaching into the territory of another medium. We work with pure silk and we also work with precious metals like gold and silver. I describe my creative practice as a continuation of a heritage, of a legacy that is really two thousand years old. That I am merely someone who continues an enormous contribution that has been made over the centuries by many people of the world, many cultures of the world. Tens of thousands of craft people, artists and designers that have worked with the craft that I practice and very importantly, even though I am maybe the face of my workshop, I also see my contribution as being inseparable from the craftspeople who work with me and it’s really their work that I celebrate in instances like this where an artist must collaborate with a traditional maker. It can’t merely be about my creative impulse, my creative output. So I see my role as an enabler as opposed to the artist that walks away with the credit.

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        • Faig Ahmed: Jameel Prize 3

          02:28

          from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

          3,321 Plays / / 1 Comment

          Faig Ahmed was born in Baku, Azerbaijan, where he currently lives and works. His work explores traditional Azerbaijani rug-making, introducing contemporary sculptural elements and processes to create striking works that reflect modern life. With the carpet as a stereotypical symbol of the East, Ahmed explains his interest in exploring its form. Transcription: I’m an explorer, I love experimenting with my own emotions and feelings and how the people feel about objects of my creativity. The main things that interest me are the old traditions, ancient cultures and standard canons, stereotypes that end up being broken by me. I use the carpet as a complete object, because it’s one of the most natural objects that we see from our early ages. For me as an ordinary person it’s a symbol of comfort and tradition, but not for me as an artist. By spooling carpets I add new three-dimensional patterns, but I’m not interested in any kind of merging between the past and present, I’m just interested in the past because it’s just the most stable conception of our lives. I use a computer for making the sketches and only afterwards I transfer them on to traditional materials. By using the modern pixel on the old carpet we just hear the voices of past times.

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          • Laurent Mareschal: Jameel Prize 3

            02:40

            from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

            1,589 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Laurent Mareschal was born Paris, where he is still based. Much of his work is underpinned by a preoccupation with incommunicability, and therefore invites audience involvement. Mareschal lived in Israel for several years, and his work displays Hebrew and Arabic influences. In his studio, Mareschal explains why he uses ephemeral materials such as spices, soap and food in order to evoke memories and highlight our own fragility. The works are heavily influenced by decorative elements of Middle-Eastern art and design. Transcription: Most of my work is quite ephemeral. There is something about the smell that you can’t really refuse. It gets inside of you and makes you remember something. You can play with the colour and the smell and what it makes you remember and I am playing with that. You’ve just got a very thin layer of spices and it affects your effected memory in a way. My work is often site specific. When I will install the piece Beiti at the V&A I will use ten different stencils. There will be five different spices and of course it deals with time since the work is fading away, so I love to work with time and that the work in fact is not a sculpture made out of marble but is fading away after some time. The patterns are influenced by Arabic geometry. The first time that I made it we didn’t put a rope around it so people just walked on it and ruined it completely as they thought they were real tiles. So I want people to look and think OK, they are real tiles and suddenly if they look another time they will realise it is made out of spices and it will surprise them and they will think wow, this guy is completely nuts, he has been working for a week and it will just vanish in a second. So I think it is quite a funny way to look at the work and most of the people are looking at it like that I think.

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            • Florie Salnot: Jameel Prize 3

              02:21

              from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

              1,528 Plays / / 1 Comment

              Florie Salnot was born in France and lives and works between Hamburg, London and Paris. Her interest is in social design, craft and product design, and she is motivated by the desire to use design to improve people’s lives and to inspire individual and cultural confidence. The Saharawi people of the Sahara desert are refugees living with scant resources and under harsh conditions in southwest Algeria. Here, Salnot discusses ‘Plastic Gold’, a jewellery design project she developed with the Saharawi women with the aim of giving them a voice through art. Transcription: The Saharawi people are refugees in southwest Algeria since 1975. They are actually living in the middle of the Saharwi desert in a really harsh environment with difficult weather with no resources available. I was made aware of them through the charity Sunblast and their aim is to give a voice to the Saharwi population through the arts. The brief at the beginning was just to design something that could actually benefit them. I knew they were already making some jewellery before and I tried to look at the craft they used to have and I started to experiment with that. The idea was to build a technique that they could make themselves within the refugee camps with the resources they have available, even through they have almost nothing. The pieces that are in the exhibition are pieces that I have designed and developed myself but in development of the workshop that I carried out with the Saharwi women. I was just trying to do at the same time something social and something aesthetic because I think the both of them really fit each other. That’s why I was really trying to bring them together and I think it makes sense to bring them together.

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              • Nada Debs: Jameel Prize 3

                02:28

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                1,612 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Nada Debs is a Lebanese furniture and product designer. She studied in the USA and worked in London before returning to Lebanon in 2000 to found East and East, a company that manufactures and sells her furniture and home accessories lines. Debs discusses her application of traditional Arabic crafts to contemporary forms. The works are an extension of her personal experiences and the cultures she has been exposed to. Transcription: My work is an extension of my personal experiences. My upbringing in Japan actually started with my great uncle who moved to Japan in 1917. So my father moved to Japan in the fifties and I was bought up there. I found myself coming back to my Arab roots through my own personal journey which is actually being bought up in Japan, studying in the States at the Rhode Island School of Design, living in London, working in the UK, and then thirteen years ago I moved back to Beirut. My general practice involves designing, manufacturing and selling contemporary furniture. Basically what I have been doing is taking the craft of this part of the world and applying it on contemporary forms in order for us to take craft that is traditional but make it look more available to the lifestyle of the people of the present. For the ‘Concrete Carpet’ I worked with Pascal Zoghbi. We took the Japanese calligraphy Kanji and the Arabic Kufi script and we put the two together and superimposed it and we used that to create the font. This font is laid in random words throughout the panels on the concrete carpet and they create a kind of hyper-poetry, like a rhythmical effect on the carpet.

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                • Pascal Zoghbi: Jameel Prize 3

                  02:37

                  from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

                  1,403 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Pascal Zoghbi is one of only a few designers working in the relatively new discipline of contemporary Arabic typography. Having studied extensively in Europe, Zoghbi returned to his hometown of Beirut in Lebanon to found 29letters. His work involves creating new Arabic typefaces, corporate identities and print publications. Understanding the structure of traditional calligraphic styles is important to contemporary Arabic typeface design, and Zoghbi's objective is to create a balance between the old and the new. Transcription: I am a type designer working on contemporary Arabic typefaces. Beside my type design I am also a graphic designer and I teach typography and design at universities in Beirut. I think now we are at the future of Arabic type. It’s now happening. There is a bigger amount of Arabic type designers working on type. There are a lot of people asking for type and they want to use it in web and mobile and print. They are bored using the same fonts again and again and somehow it’s contagious. If some of the companies or a firm or museum has its own type done for it, then the others think, ah we also want a special type created. A certain magazine or newspaper also want it, so people are asking for it more. This is not only good for us as designers but it’s good for the overall design community and visual design environment and the Arab region. I am always referring to the calligraphic aspect of the Arabic script and then I always challenge myself as to how I can redesign or reshape these letters in a contemporary manner, but still retain and respect the Arabic calligraphy and I try to retain a certain balance. Not to really go to the experimental wild part of it and not to just to stick to the calligraphy. To create something new which is somewhere in-between these two worlds and establish a certain aesthetic to the letters, which are not seen before either in the calligraphic form or the typographical form.

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                  • Dice Kayek: Jameel Prize 3

                    02:26

                    from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

                    1,992 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Turkish sisters Ece and Ayse Ege founded their fashion brand, Dice Kayek, in Paris in 1992. The brand reflects their Turkish origins, bridging East and West, the traditional and the modern, the luxurious and the sober. Now living and working between Istanbul and Paris, their couture pieces draw inspiration from Islamic architecture and crafts, elements of which they draw upon to create bold contemporary garments. They describe their early fascination with traditional textiles and offer an insight into their Jameel Prize-nominated collection ‘Istanbul Contrast’. Transcription: Dice Kayek is a fashion brand and we are fashion designers. Our designs are inspired by architecture and tradition. Although it’s very fashionable to become fashion designers these days, we decided to become fashion designers when we were very young girls. From the very beginning, from our childhood we were surrounded by textiles, silk and embroidery tradition. ‘Istanbul Contrast’ is a collection of nineteen dresses. All of these dresses are telling us a story of a city, Istanbul, which is a city of contrasts in the lifestyle, in the architecture and in everything, in every area. This is the first time a fashion designer is nominated for the Jameel Prize and it’s very good timing because we are living in an era where fashion melts and meets with arts. It’s perfect timing and we are extremely honoured and extremely happy about it.

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                    • Jameel Prize 3: The shortlist

                      01:45

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                      4,607 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      The Jameel Prize is an international award for contemporary art and design inspired by Islamic tradition. Its aim is to explore the relationship between Islamic traditions of art, craft and design and contemporary work as part of a wider debate about Islamic culture and its role today. Ten artists and designers have been shortlisted for this year's £25,000 prize. The work of the shortlisted artists and designers will be shown at the V&A from 11 December 2013 until 24 April 2014. The winner of the Jameel Prize 3 will be announced at the V&A on 10 December 2013

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