1. Do We Have Authority to Forgive Sin? (Matthew 6:12)

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    from John MacArthur / Added

    http://www.macarthurcommentaries.com And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. (Matthew 6:12) Those who trust in the Lord Jesus Christ have received God's pardon for sin and are saved from eternal hell. And since, as we have seen, this prayer is given to believers, the debts referred to here are those incurred by Christians when they sin. Immeasurably more important than our need for daily bread is our need for continual forgiveness of sin. Because man's greatest problem is sin, his greatest need is forgiveness-and that is what God provides. Though we have been forgiven the ultimate penalty of sin, as Christians we need God's constant forgiveness for the sins we continue to commit. We are to pray, therefore, forgive us. Forgiveness is the central theme of this entire passage (vv. 9--15), being mentioned six times in eight verses. Everything leads to or issues from forgiveness. Believers have experienced once-for-all God's judicial forgiveness, which they received the moment Christ was trusted as Savior. We are no longer condemned, no longer under judgment, no longer destined for hell (Rom. 8:1). The eternal Judge has declared us pardoned, justified, righteous. No one, human or satanic, can condemn or bring any "charge against God's elect" (Rom. 8:33--34). But because we still fall into sin, we frequently require God's gracious forgiveness, His forgiveness not now as Judge but as Father. "If we say that we have no sin, we are deceiving ourselves, and the truth is not in us," John warns believers. But, he goes on to assure us, "If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us...

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    • Jesus Over All: Calming the Storm, #1a

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      from John MacArthur / Added

      http://www.gty.org/Radio Why should you believe Jesus was God when even some who watched Him day after day didn't believe? What do Jesus' miracles say about who He is and what He demands of you? http://www.gty.org/Radio

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      • Jesus Over All: Dominating Powers, #2a

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        from John MacArthur / Added

        They're noisy, they're messy, they eat a lot — and just about anything. What could pigs possible have to do with strengthening your trust in Jesus? http://www.gty.org/Radio

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        • Will Believers Be Judged When Christ Returns? (1 Corinthians 3)

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          from John MacArthur / Added

          http://www.macarthurcommentaries.com/ A new building is usually checked out carefully before it is occupied or used. Cities, counties, and states have codes that require buildings to meet certain standards. God has strict standards for what we build for Him in and with our lives. When Christ returns, every believer’s work will be tested as to quality. Fire is the symbol of testing. Just as it purifies metal, so will the fire of God’s discernment burn up the dross and leave what is pure and valuable (cf. Job 23:10; Zech. 13:9; 1 Pet. 1:17; Rev. 3:18). That will not be a time of punishment but a time of reward. Even the one who has built with wood, hay, or straw will not be condemned; but his reward will correspond to the quality of his building materials. When wood, hay, or straw come in contact with fire they are burned up. Nothing is left but cinders. They cannot stand the test. Gold, silver, and precious stones, however, do not burn. They will stand the test, and they will bring great reward. Believers who have right motives, proper conduct, and effective service build with gold, silver, and precious stones. They do constructive work for the Lord and will receive corresponding rewards. He shall receive a reward. That simple and hopeful promise is the message of eternal joy and glory. Whatever our service to God’s glory, He will reward. Many humanly impressive and seemingly beautiful and worthwhile works that Christians do in the Lord’s name will not stand the test in “that day.” It “will become evident” (v. 13) that the materials used were wood, hay, and straw. The workmen will not lose their salvation, but they will lose a portion of any reward they might be expecting. They shall be saved, yet so as through fire. The thought here is of a person who runs through flames without being burned, but who has the smell of smoke on him—barely escaping! In the day of rewards, the useless and evil things will be burned away, but salvation will not be forfeited. It is easy to fool ourselves into thinking that anything we do in the Lord’s name is in His service, just as long as we are sincere, hardworking, and well meaning. But what looks to us like gold may turn out to be straw, because we have not judged our materials by the standards of God’s Word—pure motives, holy conduct, and selfless service. http://www.macarthurcommentaries.com/

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          • The Murder of God's Son: A Prophetic Parable, Part 1B (Luke 20:9-18) John MacArthur

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            from John MacArthur / Added

            http://www.gty.org/Resources/Sermons/42-245 We have the joy of returning to our study of the gospel of Luke, this great inspired history of the life and ministry of our Lord Jesus Christ. If you will, open your Bible to the twentieth chapter of Luke, we come to verse 9 and a prophetic parable, a prophetic parable concerning the murder of God's Son. If you have been with us in recent days in our study of the gospel of Luke, you're very well aware of the fact that we have now entered into the last week of our Lord's life before His death. As we come to this section, it is Wednesday...Wednesday of Passion Week. Friday He will be crucified, Sunday He will rise again...this is Wednesday....

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            • The Church's Confessional Carol of Christ, Part 2 (1 Timothy 3:15-16) John MacArthur

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              from John MacArthur / Added

              http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/80-317 One of the remarkable realities in this season is how predominant the presence of Christmas carols becomes in our society. No matter how we want to remove Christianity from our culture, no matter how politically incorrect it is to speak the gospel, you can't go into a store or an office building, just about anywhere without hearing Christmas carols being played or sung in the background. They are ubiquitous. They are absolutely everywhere. And I always have sort of a general smile on my face when I get into those environments because many people in our culture, though they're listening to an instrumental version of a Christmas carol, know the words well enough to be reciting them in their own minds, even though they don't necessarily believe the gospel. This is one of the good gifts of God's grace to our society, many, many centuries of great Christmas theology captured in these songs and carols which are so common in our culture. The gospel is really proclaimed far and wide musically for those who are listening to it. Christmas carols are a great blessing and a great heritage, especially those who know and love the Lord Jesus Christ because we understand the meaning of those wonderful words which are a part of that music. By the way, a carol, the dictionary says, the Old English Dictionary says, "a carol is a song or hymn of gladness." It doesn't have to be just about Christmas, it could be about any glad theme, any joyous theme. And, of course, there's nothing more joyous than the incarnation, the birth of the Lord Jesus Christ because of which all other truly joyous things have come to pass. When we look back on the wonderful hymns and carols that are a part of our heritage, we find in them the clear rich statements of gospel truth and they are a wonderful heritage for us....

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              • "How Long, O Lord?" (Isaiah 5-6) John MacArthur

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                from John MacArthur / Added

                http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/80-398 Well, it's such a joy to come now to time around the Lord's Table, and we do that because there is no aspect of God's work in our lives for which we are more thankful than the provision of the Lord Jesus Christ as a sacrifice for sin. I told you, this morning, that in preparation for this I would endeavor to give you a bit of a perspective on the times in which we live, from the Word of God. And in order to do that I...I want to draw your attention to a passage that has been really a staple in my understanding through the years--the fifth and six chapters of Isaiah, fifth and sixth chapters of Isaiah. It wasn't too long ago that we spent a wonderful couple of months in the fifty-third chapter of Isaiah, but chapters 5 and 6 are also very definitive chapters. Keep in mind that Isaiah's responsibility as a prophet was to declare judgment coming on his people. He was given the responsibility and fulfilled it to the letter to pronounce judgment, judgment from God, the wrath of God. And that's what the opening 39 chapters are about; they're all about judgment and they...they indicate to us not only the nature of God's judgment, but the reason for God's judgment. And when you come to chapter 5, you have really a very dramatic scene that lays out the reasons why God is going to judge the people of Israel, and He's actually going to use the Babylonians--the judgment was the Babylonian assault, the Babylonian raids. The Babylonians came in, literally destroyed the city of Jerusalem, and hauled away the Jews in three different deportations--and for all intents and purposes, destroyed their culture for a period of seventy years and more....

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                • James: The Brother of Our Lord (Selected Scriptures) John MacArthur

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                  from John MacArthur / Added

                  http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/80-394 We have been doing a series along the last few months on Sunday nights from a book that I wrote called Twelve Unlikely Heroes, and it is a book that is designed to demonstrate what God can do with very unlikely, very flawed, very weak people. We have gone through a long list and we only have a few more. Tonight we're going to be looking at James, the brother of our Lord, and then next Sunday night we'll look at the final two: Mark who wrote the gospel of Mark, and Onesimus--Onesimus being a runaway slave, and their lives intersected in a most remarkable way. Certainly James, the brother of our Lord, is an unlikely hero. And he is in a spiritual sense a hero. We're talking about spiritual heroism that is amazing and powerful, spiritual impact and influence that extends far beyond what one would assume based on what we know to be true about a certain individual. We're talking about spiritual heroism being used mightily of God....

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                  • A Sinner Meets a Seeking Savior, Part 1B (Luke 19:1-10) John MacArthur

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                    from John MacArthur / Added

                    http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/42-238 I would invite you to open your Bible now to the nineteenth chapter of the gospel of Luke. Luke chapter 19 and the opening ten verses which provide for us one of the most familiar New Testament stories in all the Bible. If you were raised in the church and if you attended Sunday School, you were taught the story of Zacchaeus, a little man who climbed up a tree to see Jesus. Here is that wonderful story. It is only recorded by Luke, does not appear in the other three gospels, but Luke's account is rich and instructive. Luke chapter 19 and I'll read, starting at verse 1 down through verse 10. "And He...meaning Jesus...entered and was passing through Jericho. And behold, there was a man called by the name of Zacchaeus and he was a chief tax-collector, and he was rich. And he was trying to see who Jesus was, and he was unable because of the crowd, for he was small in stature. And he ran on ahead and climbed up into a sycamore tree in order to see Him, for He was about to pass through that way. And when Jesus came to the place, He looked up and said to him, 'Zacchaeus, hurry and come down, for today I must stay at your house.' And he hurried and came down and received Him gladly. And when they saw it, they all began to grumble, saying, 'He has gone to be the guest of a man who is a sinner.' And Zacchaeus stopped and said to the Lord, 'Behold, Lord, half of my possessions I will give to the poor, and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will give back four times as much.' And Jesus said to him, 'Today salvation has come to this house because he, too, is a son of Abraham. For the Son of Man has come to seek and to save that which was lost.'"...

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                    • The Believer's Gift to Christ, Part 1 (Luke 21:34-36) John MacArthur

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                      from John MacArthur / Added

                      http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/42-265 We are obviously in the midst of the largest, longest, most elaborate and most expensive celebration in the western world, Christmas. Nothing even comes close to it. In fact, you could collect all other holidays celebrated in the western world, put them together and they wouldn't approximate Christmas. More activity goes on, more events, more spending, more celebrating, more parties, more everything than with any other event. In fact, this is surely the most well-known ancient story in all of western civilization, the story of the birth of our Lord Jesus Christ. And it's interesting to me that the world would spend so much time and so much effort for good and bad reasons to accumulate such a massive event as to what Christmas has become, realizing that at the heart of it all, it is to mark the birth of the Son of God. It is amazing what the birth of the Lord Jesus Christ two thousand years ago has set in motion in terms of society. And it seems to me it gets bigger every year. It certainly starts earlier every year...for sure. Though the main event historically is the birth of the Lord Jesus Christ, that no longer is the simple reality of Christmas...that has been severely obscured and confused and clouded by unrelated silliness like Santa Claus and reindeer and all the entourage that goes with that. And mix in a few winter items and somehow you get a rather confused scenario. But still, the reason for all of this at the heart is the birth of the Son of God. The world has literally created its biggest party around that event. There will not be a party the next time He comes. In fact, the Bible says all enterprise business will cease when He comes. It will be the end of everything. The Bible says no more music, no more singing, no more joy, no more celebration the next time He comes....

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