1. What We Put In and What We Take Out of The Ocean

    59:39

    from SCCWRP / Added

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    Current and Emerging Issues in Marine Conservation Dr. Denny Takahashi and Dr. George Leonard Ocean Conservancy

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    • Oceanic Institute: Aquaculture Research with Anthony Ostrowski

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      from Jay Fidell / Added

      7 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Hosts Jay Fidell and Angus McKelvey speak with Anthony Ostrowski (Oceanic Institute) about aquaculture research in Hawaii.

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      • Marine Education and Employment with Rachel Shackelford-Orange, Cindy Hunter, and Allen Hong

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        from Jay Fidell / Added

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        Host Kayla Rosenfeld speaks with Rachel Shackelford-Orange (Data Department Manager, Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory), Cindy Hunter (Director, Marine Option Program) and Allen Hong (Retired Manager Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve) about ocean related careers.

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        • MARINE Seminar | Nov 9, 2009 at Hopkins Marine Station

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          from CyperusMedia.com / Added

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          Four professors at Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station, George Somero, Mark Denny, Fiorenza Micheli, and Steve Palumbi, each present a short talk discussing current topics that policy makers need to know about climate change and the oceans. This event is Part One of the seven part Monterey Area Research Institutions' Network for Education (MARINE) seminar series. Center for Ocean Solutions http://www.centerforoceansolutions.org Hopkins Marine Station http://www-marine.stanford.edu MARINE Seminar Series http://cosmarine.stanford.edu

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          • Oceanic Living Data (Iteration 03)

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            Edited 2012-05-23. Performance installation, Rozelle School of Visual Arts, 7 May 2012. Dancers Caterina Mocciola and Ashley Macqueen and musician Fabio Muccini improvise with animated data: tracings of scientific diagrams and graphs, and human gestures. Scientific data come from the Australian Antarctic Division and the Climate Change Cluster, University of Technology, Sydney. Patterns in data gleaned from the Southern Ocean reveal forces of climate change.

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            • Interview with Dr Judy Lemus (HIMB)-SD

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              from Dr. Judy Lemus / Added

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              Dr. Judy Lemus discusses the seaHarmony online collaboration network and walks viewers through the website.

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              • Ocean Observatories - Josh Kohut, Rutgers University

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                from Kavli Frontiers of Science / Added

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                Ocean Observatories Josh Kohut, Rutgers University Coastal ecosystems span from watersheds to the deep sea and are extremely complex. This complexity drives multi-disciplinary approaches to better understand the coupled mechanisms that define ocean ecology. The rapid evolution of the Integrated Ocean Observation System (IOOS) and the Ocean Observing Initiative (OOI) are made possible through rapidly developing technology, interdisciplinary partnerships, and networked data sharing. These networks capture ocean hydrography and hydrodynamics at fine scales in space and time over regional spatial extents. The networks are enabled by rapid advances in technology, from satellites in space to robots below the ocean surface. These systems are built to support both basic research and the practical needs of society, including offshore resource management and the economy. This section will introduce the technologies and approaches that advance our scientific understanding of coupled ocean physical, biological and chemical processes that are the foundation of seascape ecology. Background Review Article: Across the land-sea boundary with an IOOS informed seascape ecology supporting ecosystem management. John P. Manderson and Josh T. Kohut.

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                • Ocean Observatories - Kelly Benoit Bird, Oregon State University

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                  from Kavli Frontiers of Science / Added

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                  Running Head: Spatial Aggregations Regulate Community Kelly Benoit Bird, Oregon State University The importance of spatial pattern in ecosystems has long been recognized. However, incorporating patchiness into our understanding of forces regulating ecosystems has proven challenging. We used a combination of continuously sampling moored sensors, complemented by shipboard sampling, to measure the temporal variation, abundance, and vertical distribution of four trophic levels in Hawaii's nearshore pelagic ecosystem. Using an analysis approach from trophic dynamics, we found that the frequency and intensity of spatial aggregations, rather than total biomass, in each step of a food chain involving phytoplankton, copepods, mesopelagic micronekton, and spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) were the most significant predictors of variation in adjacent trophic levels. Patches of organisms had impacts disproportionate to the biomass of organisms within them. Our results are in accordance with resource limitation - mediated by patch dynamics - regulating structure at each trophic step in this ecosystem, as well as the foraging behaviour of the top predator. Because of their high degree of heterogeneity, ecosystem-level effects of patchiness like this may be common in many pelagic marine systems. Long-term deployments of similar, moored technologies at several sites around the globe (the Ocean Observing Initiative) will help determine the role of heterogeneity in marine systems. However, because most marine ecosystems are not tightly coupled to geography, new approaches to sustained mobile sampling of plants and animals will be a critical component of understanding ecological processes in the ocean. Background Review Article: Witze, A. "Marine science: Oceanography's billion-dollar baby." Nature 501.7468 (2013): 480-482.

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                  • Releasing Oliver, a Giant Pacific Octopus

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                    from Randy Williams / Added

                    At the Marine Science and Technology Center (MaST) of Highline College, we collect and release two giant pacific octopus (GPO) per year. The MaST Center is the marine biology and oceanography dept for Highline College in Des Moines, WA. The MaST Center is located on the shores of Puget Sound in a community called Redondo Beach. On October 18, 2014 we had a public showing of the release of "Oliver". This Giant Pacific Octopus had been caught and brought to our aquarium in July of this year. This is our 2nd release program for the year. We show the live release on our two large video monitors in our aquarium. Our primary diver is on underwater comms so the visitors can here the running commentary from the deep. It's a heckuva lot of fun for our divers and our guests. Enjoy!

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                    • Ocean Observatories - Matthew Oliver, University of Delaware

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                      from Kavli Frontiers of Science / Added

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                      Using Ocean Observatories to Discover Habitat Associations Matthew Oliver, University of Delaware Adaptive ocean observatories that sample in both a Eulerian and Lagrangian framework play a critical role in discovering how and why marine organisms use dynamic seascapes. In a Eulerian framework, observations are made in a fixed location as a seascape flows by an observer. In a Lagrangian framework, observations follow a specific seascape parcel as it flows in a field. In this presentation we will examine how ocean observatories have unlocked unique habitat associations on multiple spatial scales in three marine systems by combining elements of the Eularian and Lagrangian approach in an ocean observatory. In the West Antarctic Peninsula, we show how Eularian sampling of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) made sense of unique spatial feeding pattern driven by planetary tidal patterns in penguins. In a global scaling up this approach, we show that semi-Lagrangian satellite derived seascapes are well tuned with known “Eulerian” climate waves and trends. Finally, we regionally merge both AUV’s and satellite observations in a Lagrangian framework to show that dynamic seascape analysis can lead to predictive models for coastal fisheries in the Mid-Atlantic region. Background Review Article: Oliver, M. J., Breece, M. W., Fox, D. A., Haulsee, D., Kohut, J. T., Manderson, J., Savoy, T. 2013. Shrinking the Haystack: Using an AUV in an Integrated Ocean Observatory to Map Atlantic sturgeon in the Coastal Ocean. Fisheries, 10.1080/03632415.2013.782861

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