1. DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME? by ROBBIE DANIELS & KRISTIAN HOFFMAN

    06:45

    from BERDACHE PROJECT Added

    Piano ballad version of the first Culture Club hit. Vocals by Robbie Daniels (aka Jer Ber Jones) Piano by Kristian Hoffman Arrangement by Robbie & Kristian. Photo by Mr. Means. 2014 http://robbied.com

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    • Babies’ Building Blocks of Vaccinations

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      from Lee Memorial Health System Added 17 0 0

      Vaccinations are getting a much needed shot in the arm, following several years of public debate that linked to upticks in chicken pox and measles. Pediatricians kept pushing the course. “Little kids tend to get sick very often and when you have your vaccines it helps prevent against disease that in the past have been very common,” says Lee Memorial Health System pediatrician Dr. Denise Drago. “So if I know you’ve had your vaccines and you come in and you’re sick it’s much less likely to be something serious.” Immunizations provide a safety blanket, especially for babies, so a CDC report comes as welcome news. It found more than 90% of children are getting the MMR shot that prevents measles, mumps, and rubella, along with vaccinations for polio, hepatitis B and chickenpox. But there is still room for improvement. Beginning at age two, vaccinations as well as booster shots start to drop. It creates both vulnerability and a challenge. “We do have a lot more conversations with parents about why the shots are important and which shots they should get, when. They looked at when the child is at most risk for that disease and picked which times those children should get vaccinated for those illnesses,” says Dr. Drago. Still a current threat is whooping cough. The series of shots starts in infancy. “The primary series takes up to six months of age. And then there’s still a booster at 12 to 18 months and another booster at 4 to 6 years of age,” explains Lee Memorial Health System pediatrician Dr. Tony Pietroniro. By definition vaccines are meant to prevent illness, something that’s easy to support. “It’s to protect the people who are most vulnerable,” says Dr. Pietroniro. Health experts hope babies will be the building block in the future success of vaccinations. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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      • Childhood Vaccinations Reduce Seizures

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        from Rammedia Added 6 0 0

        Medical News Minute discusses research that identifies reducing seizure risk by getting vaccinated in a timely manner

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        • Back-to-School Shots

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          from Lee Memorial Health System Added 27 0 0

          Back-to-school season - it’s easy to get caught up in last minute shopping, but doctors hope you don’t find yourself lost in last minute shotting. The time to think of your child’s immunizations is now. “The vaccines that we give aren’t just to anything, they’re to diseases that cause a lot of problems in the past or cause serious illnesses in children. So it’s important to make sure that you’re getting them when you need them,” says Dr. Denise Drago, who is a pediatrician for Lee Memorial Health System. If your child is entering school for the first time, they have a list of required immunizations. Shots include the DTaP which covers diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis and the MMR or measles, mumps, rubella. These are combined shots. “In the past each individual thing was an individual shot. Now there are several that are three in one or you can combine some of them together. You’re not getting poked as many times so in comparison to getting four or five shots you may be getting only two or three,” says Dr. Drago. Starting in kindergarten they will also need doses of the polio vaccine, hepatitis B and varicella vaccines. A growing issue for pediatricians is parents who delay shots or skip them altogether. To comply with state standards all children should be caught up by kindergarten. Which is why doctors are prepared to educate. “We do have a lot more conversation with parents about why the shots are important and i think having an open dialogue between your pediatrician and you, helps parents feel better about the choice they’re making,” says Dr. Drago. Arming yourself with information may leave you more time for fun in the last snippets of summer. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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          • Modelling the Spread of Infectious Diseases - Professor Raymond Flood

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            from Gresham College Added 35 0 0

            Mapping the spread of disease is essential to preventing epidemics. The fascinating mathematics of infection is explained here: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/modelling-the-spread-of-infectious-diseases Mathematics has proved to be of considerable benefit in modelling the population biology of infectious diseases by examining the rate of change of the proportion of the population susceptible to, infected with and recovered from a particular infectious disease. In particular, if a vaccine is available, mathematics helps in understanding the impact of different vaccination strategies. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/modelling-the-spread-of-infectious-diseases Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk Twitter: http://twitter.com/GreshamCollege Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greshamcollege

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            • Measles: What to do if you believe in vaccination or not

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              from Rammedia Added 5 0 0

              Measles at all time high. The Medical News Minute discusses why and what to do if you believe in vaccinations or if you have personal, religious, or philosophical reasons against vaccinations.

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              • Aiming Focus on Vaccines

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                from Lee Memorial Health System Added 48 0 0

                The ultimate decisions may lay with parents, but many look to their pediatrician for help sorting through the sea of information on immunizations. “We do have a lot more conversation with parents about why the shots are important and which shots they should get when,” says Lee Memorial Health System pediatrician Dr. Denise Drago. At a time when many parents are uncertain of the benefits, the CDC released a massive report, aimed at showing results to people who skip or delay their children’s shots. “There’s been a lot of increase in vaccine preventable illnesses that we had seen in the past. That we had decreased the number through vaccines,” says Dr. Drago. “So we see a lot more chickenpox then we used to, people aren’t doing the chickenpox vaccine. A lot of people are not doing the measles vaccine.” Before the measles vaccine became available in 1963, the virus infected about a half-million Americans a year; causing 500 deaths. In recent years the number of cases dropped to around 60 nationwide. In the first three months of 2014, 129 cases are confirmed. Mumps and whooping cough are also reemerging in a series of outbreaks. With fewer people getting their children vaccinated- there is a loss of the ‘herd immunity’ meaning more opportunities to get sick. The most underutilized shot may be one of the newest - the HPV vaccine. “We’re seeing more and more HPV related tumors every year,” says Dr. Phillip Andrews, an otolaryngologist on medical staff of Lee Memorial Health System. HPV has replaced tobacco as the top cause of oral cancers. The vaccine which targets the virus had a rocky start, first approved only for young girls. “We should have been, from the outset, vaccinating both sexes. So we strongly advocate that all children be vaccinated for HPV because this is basically a preventable disease,” says Dr. Andrews. It comes back to prevention: the hundreds of millions of children over several decades living healthy lives- inoculated against preventable disease View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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                • UI-7 News, May 1, 2014

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                  from UI-7 News Added 12 0 0

                  This edition of UI-7 News aired LIVE on Thursday, May 1, 2014. UI-7 News is a production of the Department of Journalism in the College of Media on the University of Illinois campus in Champaign-Urbana. Broadcast journalism students enrolled in Journalism 445 - Video/TV Journalism II produce this half-hour live newscast Tuesdays and Thursdays on UI-7 cable TV in Champaign-Urbana, Danville and several other cities in central Illinois. The students find, write, shoot, edit and present all stories. For more information: media.illinois.edu/ui7news

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                  • UI-7 News, April 29, 2014

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                    from UI-7 News Added 32 0 0

                    This edition of UI-7 News aired LIVE on Tuesday, April 29, 2014. UI-7 News is a production of the Department of Journalism in the College of Media on the University of Illinois campus in Champaign-Urbana. Broadcast journalism students enrolled in Journalism 445 - Video/TV Journalism II produce this half-hour live newscast Tuesdays and Thursdays on UI-7 cable TV in Champaign-Urbana, Danville and several other cities in central Illinois. The students find, write, shoot, edit and present all stories. For more information: media.illinois.edu/ui7news

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                    • Keeping Kid’s Vaccines on Schedule

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                      from Lee Memorial Health System Added 31 0 0

                      If you work hard to keep your children on time, you’ve got company. Your pediatrician, along with the American Academy of Pediatrics, would like kids to stay on schedule with their vaccinations. “When the AAP made the schedule, they didn’t just choose which shots should go where. They looked at when the child is at most risk for that disease,” says Lee Memorial Health System pediatrician Dr. Denise Drago. Recent years have seen more parents engage in shot-limiting or delaying immunizations. At the same time, the number of vaccine-preventable diseases have gone up. “We see a lot more chickenpox than we used to. People aren’t doing the chickenpox vaccine. Especially overseas, they’ve had a lot of people not doing the measles vaccine and they’ve seen a large increase in the amount of measles,” says Dr. Drago. As the vaccine schedule has evolved, several shots are grouped together. They are tested and approved to be given that way. It means children get ‘poked’ fewer times. Now new research shows an even bigger benefit: strengthening your child against infections. A study published in the American Journal of Pediatrics showed use of the MMR vaccine not only protects against measles, mumps and rubella, but children who are immunized on schedule are less likely to end up in the hospital with any type of infection - especially respiratory ones. “Parents need to be more aware of what shots they did get and what shots they didn’t. That’s very different if they get a fever and end up in the emergency room then a child who got all of their shots. So you are putting your child at additional harm by not vaccinating against those things at one time.” It’s believed the grouped shots may have a general immunizing effect. The latest findings giving the vaccine schedule a much-needed shot in the arm View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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