1. Solar Forecast: June 1972 – June 2015

    10:51

    from Jeff Thompson Added 3 0 0

    Daily "solar synoptic maps" created by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These hand-drawn maps were used for solar forecasting and continue to be published today.

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    • June 2015 was hottest June on record “globally”

      01:10

      from KCSG.com Added 106 0 0

      The State of the Climate Report released by NOAA shows June as the hottest on record globally. The recent report released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also shows the first six months of 2015 also as ’record’ warm. The report takes in to account historical data as well as anomalies on both land and in the oceans. The data collected reflects the hottest land surface for June 2015, surpassing the previous record set in 2012 by 0.11º degrees Fahrenheit. During January-June 2015, the globally averaged sea surface temperature was 1.17º F above the 20th century average. The increase in climate temperatures have been reflected in Utah as well. The National Weather Service in Salt Lake reported record heat in the months of February, March and April and June.

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      • Citizen of Your Watershed: Runoff

        00:25

        from Beryl Allee Added 31 2 0

        Oils and detergents from our driveways and streets wash directly into our watersheds and inevitably make their way back to us. What’s coming back to you? In 2013, NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest College of Arts joined forces to advance a shared vision: bridging environmental science and conservation with art to create social change. The idea is to reach individuals in a new and innovative way—showcasing through art how our cumulative actions affect the health of marine and freshwater resources, and actions people can take to protect them. The 2013 collaboration culminated in an animation about the importance of nearshore habitats to salmon recovery and what landowners can do to support healthy habitat on their own property. The partnership between the Portland, Oregon-based Arts College and NOAA Fisheries has since expanded to include the Environmental Protection Agency and the establishment of the Science in Studio Award. In 2015, the award centered on water quality and the impact of toxics on our landscape. Four artists undertook three projects, identified below, to address the impacts of pharmaceuticals and toxic runoff in our watersheds and actions people can take to keep our waterways healthy. Information on the artists and their works are provided below. westcoast.fisheries.noaa.gov/education/pnca_water_quality.html

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        • Plankton Tow Procedures

          02:39

          from Amy Holman Added 4 0 0

          This video is about the NOAA Ship FAIRWEATHER's 2015 Plankton Tow Project

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          • Citizen of your Watershed: Pesticides

            00:25

            from Beryl Allee Added 16 0 0

            Many common household fertilizers and pesticides don’t just stay in your yard; they seep through and runoff into the watershed, and inevitably filter their way back to us. What’s coming back to you? In 2013, NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest College of Arts joined forces to advance a shared vision: bridging environmental science and conservation with art to create social change. The idea is to reach individuals in a new and innovative way—showcasing through art how our cumulative actions affect the health of marine and freshwater resources, and actions people can take to protect them. The 2013 collaboration culminated in an animation about the importance of nearshore habitats to salmon recovery and what landowners can do to support healthy habitat on their own property. The partnership between the Portland, Oregon-based Arts College and NOAA Fisheries has since expanded to include the Environmental Protection Agency and the establishment of the Science in Studio Award. In 2015, the award centered on water quality and the impact of toxics on our landscape. Four artists undertook three projects, identified below, to address the impacts of pharmaceuticals and toxic runoff in our watersheds and actions people can take to keep our waterways healthy. Information on the artists and their works are provided below. westcoast.fisheries.noaa.gov/education/pnca_water_quality.html

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            • Olivia & Max and the Channel Islands Seabird Restoration

              02:51

              from Montrose Restoration Added 0 0 0

              Olivia, a park ranger, and Max, an island fox, are hosts on this adventure to the Channel Islands. Once at the islands, you will learn about two very important seabird restoration projects that NOAA's Montrose Settlements Restoration Program is currently working on to help the seabirds that nest on the islands.

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              • Citizen of your Watershed: Litter

                00:25

                from Beryl Allee Added 96 0 0

                Littered objects are some of the biggest pollutants in urban environments. The toxins they produce filter through our watersheds and inevitably make their way back to us. What’s coming back to you? In 2013, NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest College of Arts joined forces to advance a shared vision: bridging environmental science and conservation with art to create social change. The idea is to reach individuals in a new and innovative way—showcasing through art how our cumulative actions affect the health of marine and freshwater resources, and actions people can take to protect them. The 2013 collaboration culminated in an animation about the importance of nearshore habitats to salmon recovery and what landowners can do to support healthy habitat on their own property. The partnership between the Portland, Oregon-based Arts College and NOAA Fisheries has since expanded to include the Environmental Protection Agency and the establishment of the Science in Studio Award. In 2015, the award centered on water quality and the impact of toxics on our landscape. Four artists undertook three projects, identified below, to address the impacts of pharmaceuticals and toxic runoff in our watersheds and actions people can take to keep our waterways healthy. Information on the artists and their works are provided below. http://www.westcoast.fisheries.noaa.gov/education/pnca_water_quality.html

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                • What's in the water?

                  00:46

                  from Acclivity Associates Added 2 0 0

                  When your neighborhood turns into a lake, it's tempting to suit up and make the most out a bad situation. But all that water had to come from somewhere, right? When water flows across city streets, farm lands and industrial areas, it brings dangerous contaminates and debris with it. We're talking malaria dangerous. Check out the links below for info on how to stay safe when the water level rises: http://www.who.int/hac/techguidance/ems/flood_cds/en/ https://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/floodCleanup.html http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/floods/cleanupwater.asp

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