1. David Link: Software Archaeology. On the Resurrection of Programs for the Mark 1, 1948–58

    01:31:27

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    19 Plays / / 0 Comments

    The Ferranti Mark 1 (1948–1958), the world’s first commercially available electronic computer, was used to create some of the earliest computer music and video games. This talk by artist and media archaeologist David Link will detail the problems and solutions of resurrecting software for the Ferranti Mark 1. Link’s research in the field of software archaeology, which belongs to the broader field of archaeology of algorithmic artifacts, proceeds in a theoretical and practical way at the same time. As humans increasingly problem solve through machines and software, history must also account for algorithmic artifacts The Observer Effects series invites thinkers to present their highly integrative work in dialogue with the fields of art and science. This lecture series takes its title from a popularized principle in physics that holds that the act of observation transforms the observed. Outside the natural sciences, the idea that the observer and the observed are linked in a web of reciprocal modification has been deeply influential in philosophy, aesthetics, psychology, and politics. May 1, 2013 Curator: Emily Zimmerman http://empac.rpi.edu/events/2013/spring/david-link

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    • Alva Noë: See Me if You Can! Art and the Limits of Neuroscience

      01:18:18

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      New ways of thinking about the nature of visual consciousness allow us to reconsider art and its place in our lives. In this lecture, Alva Noë, a leading figure in cognitive science, will argue that art is philosophical and philosophy is aesthetic. Against this background, new possibilities are presented for understanding what it is to be a person, questioning if our experience of the world stems from the firing of neurons in our brains or from our interactions with our surroundings. Curator: Emily Zimmerman http://empac.rpi.edu/events/2013/spring/alva-noë

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      • Peter Matthaes: Art Fraud: Recognizing Authenticity in Art

        58:48

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        34 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Recognizing the authenticity of an art object is as fascinating as it is complex. The classic approach, which studies style, is supported by numerous new methods of scientific investigation and by the ability to use our senses: sight, touch, smell, hearing, and to a much lesser extent, taste, substituted by our “sixth sense.” An overview will be given on the methods used by the Museo d’Arte e Scienza of Milan in its day-to-day activities to ascertain authenticity, illustrated by an ample number of cases studies. The lecture will demonstrate how such investigations are based on intuition, logic, and the results of rigorous scientific and sensorial analyses. October 10, 2012 Curator: Emily Zimmerman http://empac.rpi.edu/events/2012/fall/observer-effects/peter-matthaes

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        • Manuel Lima: The Power of Networks

          01:26:15

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          212 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Manuel Lima, author of Visual Complexity: Mapping Patterns of Information, will lead a discussion on network visualization that will be drawn live by ImageThink (Nora Herting and Heather Willems). Network visualization has experienced a meteoric rise in the last decade, bringing together people from various fields and capturing the interest of individuals across the globe. As the practice continues to shed light on an incredible array of complex issues, it keeps drawing attention back to itself. This talk will explore a critical paradigm shift in various areas of knowledge, as we stop relying on hierarchical tree structures and turn instead to networks to map the inherent complexities of our modern world. The talk will also showcase a variety of captivating examples of network visualization and introduce the network topology as a new cultural meme. The Observer Effects series invites thinkers to present their highly integrative work in dialogue with the fields of art and science. This lecture series takes its title from a popularized principle in physics that holds that the act of observation transforms the observed. Outside the natural sciences, the idea that the observer and the observed are linked in a web of reciprocal modification has been deeply influential in philosophy, aesthetics, psychology, and politics. November 7, 2012 CURATOR: EMILY ZIMMERMAN http://empac.rpi.edu/events/2012/fall/observer-effects/manuel-lima

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