1. *UNCUT LIVE FOOTAGE* M20 Chicago #noNATO

    05:23:46

    from Rebelutionary_Z / Added

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    Uncut LIVE footage from my entire day of streaming on May 20th, 2012 here in Chicago...The only missing footage from 10:30am until my arrest at 5pm is the few times my stream dropped out...

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    • Ciudad expandida

      03:19:30

      from Prototyping / Added

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      Segunda sesión del módulo 'Tecnociudadanía y procomún', impartido en el marco del Máster en Comunicación, Cultura y Ciudadanía Digitales (http://cccd.es/). La sesión cuenta con la participación invitada de Zuloark y Basurama. Esta sesión explora la penetración de la cultura de los prototipos en el espacio e imaginario urbano. Por ejemplo el movimiento Occupy global y el 15M en España han centrado la atención de los analistas políticos y sociales por la dimensión "urbana" de las protestas. Las ciudades, y en concreto las formas materiales de sus plazas, sus infraestructuras y sus espacios públicos, han recobrado así cierto protagonismo como actores políticos. Las nuevas esferas públicas digitales, y las formas de protesta digital, han atravesado las capas físicas y materiales de la ciudad. La recursividad de la red se ha infiltrado en las vivencias y prácticas de "hacer" ciudad. Hemos asistido así a nuevas experiencias de "hackeo" de la ciudad: nuevas maneras de expresar nuestros "derechos" ciudadanos, y en este sentido, nuevas formulaciones del "derecho a la ciudad". Podríamos hablar incluso de un nuevo momento en la historia de las ciudades: la emergencia de la "urbe prototipo", en el que los comunes de la ciudad se hacen visibles en ese estado "beta" y experimental que caracteriza la nueva cultura del prototipo.

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      • Occupy Perth - Meet the Occupiers

        02:43:52

        from Occupy Ottawa Media Team / Added

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        On December 11th 2011, residents of the Perth, Ontario Community were invited to come out and be introduced to the Occupy movement through the eyes and experience of a few people involved with Occupy Ottawa. This is what transpired...

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        • Walka trwa! Od Placu Tahrir po Plac Wolności

          02:40:47

          from Krytyka Polityczna - Klub w Krak / Added

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          Dyskusja o arabskich rewolucjach oraz europejskich i amerykańskich ruchach społecznych, które dynamicznie rozwijały się na przestrzeni ostatniego roku. Rozmawialiśmy o arabskiej „Wiośnie Ludów”, hiszpańskich „Indignados”, „Occupy Wall Street” i polskich „Oburzonych”. Przedmiotem naszej rozmowy były również perspektywy na radykalną zmianę społeczną w Polsce i na świecie. 7 listopada, poniedziałek, godz. 18.00. Massolit Books & Cafe, ul. Felicjanek 4 Goście: Grzegorz Janiczak (współorganizator warszawskiego „Marszu Oburzonych”), Jakub Majmurek (Krytyka Polityczna), Agata Młodawska (Instytut Socjologii UJ, Nowe Peryferie), Jan Sowa (Goldex Poldex, Instytut Kultury UJ). Prowadzenie: Antoni Grześczyk (Krytyka Polityczna - Klub w Krakowie)

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          • What is the #Occupy movement?

            02:40:32

            from Platypus Affiliated Society / Added

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            A roundtable discussion with students and activists either directly involved with Occupy Wall St. or who are closely following the #Occupy movement. Description: The recent #Occupy protests are driven by discontent with the present state of affairs: glaring economic inequality, dead-end Democratic Party politics, and, for some, the suspicion that capitalism could never produce an equitable society. These concerns are coupled with aspirations for social transformation at an international level. For many, the protests at Wall St. and elsewhere provide an avenue to raise questions the Left has long fallen silent on: What would it mean to challenge capitalism on a global scale? How could we begin to overcome social conditions that adversely affect every part of life? And, how could a new international radical movement address these concerns in practice? Although participants at Occupy Wall St. have managed thus far to organize resources for their own daily needs, legal services, health services, sleeping arrangements, food supplies, defense against police brutality, and a consistent media presence, these pragmatic concerns have taken precedent over long-term goals of the movement. Where can participants of this protest engage in formulating, debating, and questioning the ends of this movement? How can it affect the greater society beyond the occupied spaces? We in the Platypus Affiliated Society ask participants and interested observers of the #Occupy movement to consider the possibility that political disagreement could lead to clarification, further development and direction. Only when we are able create an active culture of thinking and debating on the Left without it proving prematurely divisive can we begin to imagine a Leftist politics adequate to the historical possibilities of our moment. We may not know what these possibilities for transformation are. This is why we think it is imperative to create avenues of engagement that will support these efforts. Towards this goal, Platypus will be hosting a series of roundtable discussions with organizers and participants of the #Occupy movement. These will start at campuses in New York and Chicago but will be moving to other North American cities, and to London, Germany, and Greece in the months to come. We welcome any and all who would like to be a part of this project of self-education and potential rebuilding of the Left to join us in advancing this critical moment. The Platypus Affiliated Society October 2011 ------------------------ Roundtable Participants Phil Arnone is a grad student in NYU's Draper Interdisciplinary Program. He has been active in the anti-war and alter-globalization movements since high school; was an organizer with Students for a Democratic Society and a member of United Students Against Sweatshops while completing his undergraduate studies at the University of Mary Washington, where he was a student organizer for the campus living wage campaign which successfully won a living wage for all University workers in 2006. After college he worked as a boycott organizer for UNITE HERE, the hotel and food service workers union. He has been active in the Occupy Wall St. movement, and is working on linking up existing workers' and immigrants' rights organizations to OWS and connecting the OWS protests to the ongoing struggles throughout the city. Jackrabbit began his political awakening as an anarchist in Philadelphia in the late 80s where he was a squatter and volunteered at the Wooden Shoe infoshop for many years. After hitchhiking across the US and Europe he finally ended up in San Francisco where after many years he would eventually obtain a Bachelor's in International Relations at San Francisco State University. Currently he works at a marketing agency in midtown Manhattan. Jackrabbit is a member of the Politics and Electoral Reform working group at OWS and is also involved with the inter-occupation communication initiative being developed at OWS. Chris Maisano is a public librarian in Brooklyn, rank-and-file activist in DC37 Local 1482, and chair of the NYC local of Democratic Socialists of America and in solidarity with Teamsters art handlers' union at Sotheby's. He is a contributing writer for Jacobin. Maisano is part of the OWS Demands Working Group. Lisa Montanarelli has been active in antiwar protests, community health activism, LGBT rights, and a variety of other causes since the late 1980s. She worked for California Prevention Education Project (Cal-PEP), providing HIV street outreach to people of color, sex workers and homeless youth. After earning her Ph.D. in comparative literature at U.C. Berkeley and teaching college level, she became more deeply involved in community health education—teaching for San Francisco Sex Information, and—as a hepatitis C patient for over 20 years—facilitating workshops for patients and healthcare providers. She co-authored The First Year Hepatitis C: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed and three other non-fiction books. Lisa is a member of the OWS Education and Empowerment and Think Tank Working Groups and helps the Coaching Working Group by interviewing occupiers and blogging at www.visionaries.co. She is also active in the Stop Stop-and-Frisk movement, and through the Interdependence Project. Montanarelli facilitates meditation sessions for OWS at Liberty Plaza. Jordan Morrel has been at Occupy Wall Street for four weeks. At OWS he has served as a facilitator for the General Assembly, and has focused on Sanitation, Mediation, and having conversations with people about such typically taboo subjects as the connections between capitalism and democracy in the United States today, and the radical idea of building society based on respect, not fear, of each other. Jordan grew up in San Francisco, where he was a mental health and substance use counselor, worked at a non-profit volunteer-run collective "Bike Kitchen," and participated in Food Not Bombs, Reclaim the Streets parties, Critical Mass, and other silly activities. He plans to stay in NYC indefinitely. Laura Schleifer created the word 'artivist' to describe her life's purpose as an artist-activist. A NYCbased writer, theater artist, and NYU Tisch grad, her work has spanned the Middle East, where she performed for Palestinian and Iraqi children on a theater/circus tour, to an NGO in Nicaragua, where she taught English through the use of theater, to off-Broadway, where she's performed her sociallyconscious songs and monologues at theaters throughout New York with the Theaters Against War network, and worked with homeless and at-risk youth as an Artist Mentor. She also served as Outreach/Panelist coordinator at this year's Left Forum conference, and and organized and chaired a panel on whether the USA should owe amnesty to undocumented immigrants fleeing from U.S. imperialism. Her original feature screenplay, The Feral Child, was a Sundance Screenwriters Lab finalist, and her short play, Toyz in tha Hood, lead to a NYC arts grant for the First City Theater Co. She also writes for several publications, including Looking Glass Magazine and The Leftist Review. Laura is currently developing a homeless 'survival guide' website at www.wheninneed.org. Schleifer is part of the OWS Alternative Economies Working Group. ***Unless otherwise stated by the participants, their comments today do not necessarily reflect the overall opinion of their respective Working Groups.

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            • What is the #Occupy Movement?: Part II Roundtable Discussion

              02:35:42

              from Platypus Affiliated Society / Added

              665 Plays / / 0 Comments

              What is the #Occupy Movement? A series of roundtable discussions hosted by The Platypus Affiliated Society. This is the second part of the discussion series held in New York City. Speakers: Hannah Appel (OWS Think Tank Working Group), Erik Van Deventer (NYU), Nathan Schneider (Waging Nonviolence), Brian Dominick (Z Media Institute) Held on December 9, 2011 at New York University. The recent #Occupy protests are driven by discontent with the present state of affairs: glaring economic inequality, dead-end Democratic Party politics, and, for some, the suspicion that capitalism could never produce an equitable society. These concerns are coupled with aspirations for social transformation at an international level. For many, the protests at Wall St. and elsewhere provide an avenue to raise questions the Left has long fallen silent on: What would it mean to challenge capitalism on a global scale? How could we begin to overcome social conditions that adversely affect every part of life? And, how could a new international radical movement address these concerns in practice? We in the Platypus Affiliated Society ask participants and interested observers of the #Occupy movement to consider the possibility that political disagreement could lead to clarification, further development and direction. Only when we are able create an active culture of thinking and debating on the Left without it proving prematurely divisive can we begin to imagine a Leftist politics adequate to the historical possibilities of our moment. We may not know what these possibilities for transformation are. This is why we think it is imperative to create avenues of engagement that will support these efforts. Towards this goal, Platypus will be hosting a series of roundtable discussions with organizers and participants of the #Occupy movement. These will start at campuses in New York, Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia but will be moving to other North American cities, and overseas to London, Germany, Greece, India and South Korea in the months to come. We welcome any and all who would like to be a part of this project of self-education and potential rebuilding of the Left to join us in advancing this critical moment. The Platypus Affiliated Society December 2011 Questions Discussants were asked to consider the following questions: 1. In light of the recent series of coordinated and spectacular evictions that took place on November 15th, as well as the international Day of Action that followed two days later, is it fair to say that the #Occupy movement has entered into “phase 2”? If so, what is the nature of this new phase of the movement’s development? How has the occupation been forced to adapt to a changing set of conditions on the ground and what sorts of fresh difficulties do these new conditions pose for the occupiers? A moment of crisis can often be a moment of opportunity—what direction do you feel the movement should take in order to remain viable and relevant? 2. There are striking similarities between the Occupy movement and the 1999 anti-WTO protests in Seattle. Both began in the last year of a Democratic presidency, were spearheaded by anarchists, were motivated by discontents with neo-liberalism, and were supported by organized labor. What, if anything, makes this movement different? How is it a departure from Seattle? What are the lessons to be learned from the defeat of the anti-globalization movement? 3. Some have characterized the #Occupy movement as sounding the tocsin for “class war” (e.g., of the 99% vs. the 1%). Others recognize the fact of dramatic inequality, and want the #Occupy movement to spearhead a set of economic reforms. Others see #Occupy as transforming something revolutionary beyond the “economic”. These perspectives point to radically different directions for this movement. Would you characterize this movement as “anti-capitalist”? (Should it be?) If so, what is the nature of these “anti-capitalist” politics? In what way does the #Occupy movement affirm or reject the political ideas of anti-capitalist movements before it? 4. Some have become wary about the role of labor organizations in the #Occupy movement. Concerns point to the possibility of eventual “co-optation” into Democratic Party politics. Others worry that the “horizontal,” leaderless structure cultivated by the occupiers might be undermined by the decidedly top-down, hierarchical organization of labor unions. Certain of these collaborations, for example between the labor activists and occupiers in Oakland, have been seen as highly fruitful. Still, the broader call for a general strike that some organizers have hoped for has so far not been met. What role should organized labor play in the #Occupy movement? 5. One division that emerged early on among the occupants concerned the need to call for demands. Some took issue with the content of the demands, arguing that if these are to be truly “representative of the 99%” they cannot assume a radical stance that would alienate a large section of the population. Others worry that demands focused on electoral reform or policy would steer the movement in a conservative direction. Some call into the question the call for demands in the first place, as these would limit — even undermine — the open-ended potential for transformation present in the #Occupy movement and could only close revolutionary possibilities. What, if any, demands do you think this movement should be calling for? And, more importantly, what kind of social transformation would you like to see this movement give rise to? 6. What would it mean for the #Occupy movement to succeed? Can it? Roundtable Participants Brian Dominick has nearly 20 years' experience as an activist, organizer, and journalist. In his writing and lecturing, he has largely focused on questions of strategy and tactics for far-reaching social change. Forming and consulting alternative institutions has been a specialty of Brian's, from affinity groups to worker coops to 501(c)(3)s to international activism networks. He is a former co-founder of NewStandard News and instructor at the Z Media Institute. Erik Van Deventer is a doctoral student at NYU in the Department of Sociology, presently working on the political economy of finance. He has been active at OWS and in the demands working group. Hannah Appel earned her Ph.D. in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. With research interests in the daily life of capitalism and the private sector in Africa, in particular, Hannah's work draws on critical development studies, economic anthropology, and political economy. Her current project - Futures - is based on fourteen months of ethnographic fieldwork in the transnational oil and gas industry in Equatorial Guinea. Nathan Schneider is an editor for Waging Nonviolence. He writes about religion, reason, and violence for publications including The Nation, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The American Prospect, and others. He is also an editor at Killing the Buddha. ***Unless otherwise stated by the participants, their comments today do not necessarily reflect the overall opinion of their respective Working Groups.

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              • “The 3 Rs: Reform, Revolution, and Resistance” — NYU — 4.26.12

                02:34:25

                from Platypus Affiliated Society / Added

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                Thursday — April 26, 2012, 7:00 PM — 238 Thompson Street, Room 279 (NYU Global Center) “After the failure of the 1960s New Left, the underlying despair with regard to the real efficacy of political will, of political agency, in a historical situation of heightened helplessness, became a self-constitution as outsider, as other, rather than an instrument of transformation. Focused on the bureaucratic stasis of the Fordist, late 20th Century world, the Left echoed the destruction of that world by the dynamics of capital: neoliberalism and globalization. The idea of a fundamental transformation became bracketed and, instead, was replaced by the more ambiguous notion of ‘resistance.’ The notion of resistance, however, says little about the nature of that which is being resisted, or of the politics of the resistance involved. ‘Resistance’ is rarely based on a reflexive analysis of possibilities for fundamental change that are both generated and suppressed by the dynamic heteronomous order of capital. ‘Resistance’ is an undialectical category that does not grasp its own conditions of possibility; it fails to grasp the dynamic historical context of capital and its reconstitution of possibilities for both domination and emancipation, of which the ‘resisters’ do not recognize that that they are a part.” — Moishe Postone, “History and Helplessness: Mass Mobilization and Contemporary Forms of Anticapitalism” (Public Culture¸ 18.1: 2006) Reform, revolution, resistance: what kind of weight do these categories hold for the Left today? How are they used, to where do they point, and what is their history? Join the Platypus Affiliated Society for a discussion concerning a question that has renewed immediacy in light of the #Occupy movement. Speakers: 1. John Asimakopoulos (Institute for Transformative Studies) 2. Todd Gitlin (Columbia University) 3. Tom Trottier (Workers’ International Committee) 4. Ross Wolfe (Platypus Affiliated Society) http://www.facebook.com/events/196015840510823/

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                • #GlobalUprisings Day 2, Part 5: Experiments in Self-Organization: From Squares to Neighborhoods to Factories

                  02:29:34

                  from De Balie / Added

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                  Live stream recording - Saturday 16 november 2013 from 15:49 CET http://www.debalie.nl/agenda/programma/global-uprisings-day-2 http://www.globaluprisings.org/global-uprisings-conference-full-programme Over the past two and half years, a common organizing structure emerged in many of the neighborhoods, towns, cities and countries around the world. This structure became known as the ‘general assembly’: mass gatherings of people in public spaces where activists, workers, and communities could come together to make decisions in a less hierarchical and more decentralized way. This panel explores some of the many different forms of self-organization and horizontal decision-making that are being practiced around the world today to explore what the benefits and limitations of these models are as an organizing tool and as an alternative political structure. This panel will explore the radical content of these organizing models, which specific social relationships they challenge and how and why these models sometimes lose their content by looking at concrete examples of how they have functioned. Aylin Kuryel (Turkey), Dimitris from the Vio.Me. worker-run factory (Thessaloniki, Greece), Peter (Barcelona, Spain), Jasper Bernes (Oakland, US) with Andrej Kurnik (Maribor, Slovenia) as discussant. http://www.globaluprisings.org

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                  • Radical Interpretations of the Present Crisis, NYC, 11.14.12

                    02:27:32

                    from Platypus Affiliated Society / Added

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                    A panel event held at the New School in New York City on November 14th, 2012. Loren Goldner ┇ David Harvey ┇ Andrew Kliman ┇ Paul Mattick Do we live in a crisis of capitalism today and, if so, of what sort — political? economic? social? Why do seemingly sophisticated leftist understandings of the world appear unable to assist in the task of changing it? Conversely, can the world be thought intelligible without our capacity to self-consciously transform it through practice? Can Marxism survive as an economics or social theory without politics? Is there capitalism after socialism? Featuring: • LOREN GOLDNER // Chief Editor of Insurgent Notes; ┇ Author: — Ubu Saved From Drowning: Class Struggle and Statist Containment in Portugal and Spain, 1974-1977 (2000), — "The Sky Is Always Darkest Just Before the Dawn: Class Struggle in the U.S. From the 2008 Crash to the Eve of Occupy" (2011) • DAVID HARVEY // Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the CUNY Grad Center; ┇ Author: — The Limits to Capital (1982), — The Condition of Postmodernity (1989), — A Brief History of Neoliberalism (2005), — "Why the US Stimulus Package is Bound to Fail" (2008) • ANDREW KLIMAN // Professor of Economics at Pace University; ┇ Contributing author to the Marxist-Humanist Initiative's (MHI's) With Sober Senses in 2009; ┇ Author: — Reclaiming Marx's "Capital": A Refutation of the Myth of Inconsistency (2007), — The Failure of Capitalist Production: Underlying Causes of the "Great Recession" (2012) • PAUL MATTICK // Professor of Economics, Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Adelphi University; ┇ Editor of The Brooklyn Rail ┇ Author: — Social Knowledge: An Essay on the Nature and Limits of Social Science (1986), — Business as Usual: The Economic Crisis and the Failure of Capitalism (2011) AUDIO VERSION: http://archive.org/details/RadicalInterpretationOfThePresentCrisisNyc11.14.12

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                    • Aging in the Afterlife: The Many Deaths of Art

                      02:26:07

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                      A panel held by the Platypus Affiliated Society on Saturday, February 23rd, 2013, at the New School. PANELISTS Julieta Aranda was born in Mexico City, and currently lives and works between Berlin and New York. Central to Aranda’s multidimensional practice are her involvement with circulation mechanisms and the idea of a “poetics of circulation”; the possibility of a politicized subjectivity through the perception and use of time, and the notion of power over the imaginary. Julieta Aranda’s work has been exhibited internationally in venues such as Witte de With (2013), Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Villa Croce, Genova (2013), ArtPostions, Miami Basel (2012), MACRO Roma (2012) Documenta 13 (2012), N.B.K. (2012), Gwangju Biennial (2012), Venice Biennial (2011), Stroom den Haag (2011), “Living as form,” Creative Time, NY (2011), Istanbul Biennial (2011), Portikus, Frankfurt (2011), New Museum (2010), Solomon Guggenheim Museum (2009), New Museum of Contemporary Art, NY (2010), Kunstverein Arnsberg (2010), MOCA Miami (2009), Witte de With (2010), Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2007), 2nd Moscow Biennial (2007) MUSAC, Spain (2010 and 2006), and VII Havanna Biennial; amongst others. As a co-director of e-flux together with Anton Vidokle, Julieta Aranda has developed the projects Time/Bank, Pawnshop, and e-flux video rental, all of which started in the e-flux storefront in new York, and have traveled to many venues worldwide. Gregg Horowitz is Professor of Philosophy and Chair of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY and Adjoint Associate Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. He writes on aesthetics and the philosophy of art, psychoanalysis, and political theory. His publications include the books Sustaining Loss: Art and Mournful Life (Stanford, 2001) and The Wake of Art: Philosophy, Criticism and the Ends of Taste (Routledge, 1998, with Arthur C. Danto and Tom Huhn) and, recently, articles on “Absolute Bodies: The Video Puppets of Tony Oursler” (Parallax, 2010), “The Homeopathic Image, or, Trauma, Intimacy and Poetry,” (Critical Horizons, 2010), and “A Late Adventure of the Feelings: Loss, Trauma and the Limits of Psychoanalysis” (in The Trauma Controversy: Philosophical and Interdisciplinary Dialogues, SUNY Press, 2009). Paul Mattick, who teaches philosophy at Adelphi University, is the author of Art in Its Time and co-author, with Katy Siegel, of Artworks: Money. He has written criticism for Arts, Art in America, Artforum, The Nation, and The Brooklyn Rail, as well as catalogue essays for exhibitions at a number of museums and galleries. Yates McKee is an organizer with Strike Debt and co-editor of the magazine Tidal: Occupy Theory, Occupy Strategy. His work as an art critic has appeared in venues including October, Grey Room, Texte Zur Kunst, Oxford Art Journal, The Nation, and Waging Nonviolence. He recently co-edited a volume for Zone Books entitled Sensible Politics: The Visual Cultures of Nongovernmental Activism.

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