1. Ovarian Cancer Break The Silence: Carol L. Clinton, MD

    02:25

    from Timeless Skin Solutions Added 23 0 0

    Dr. Carol Clinton, founder of Timeless Skin Solutions shares her ovarian cancer story. Understand the warning signs and listen to your body.

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    • Finding Female Cancers

      01:53

      from Lee Memorial Health System Added 13 0 0

      A challenging aspect of ovarian cancer is that it has few outward symptoms. Making it difficult to diagnose until the cancer has spread. “There is no vaccine for ovarian cancer. There’s no proven screening test. It does get diagnosed at unfortunately an advanced stage,” explains. He is oncologist Dr. Samith Sandadi on medical staff of Lee Memorial Health System. Only about 20% of women are diagnosed early, when the disease may be most curable, which is why doctors are trying to find female cancers sooner, through genetic testing. “It’s only if you have certain risk factors that we would offer it. And it’s very important to know what those risk factors are because it gives you a better overall picture of your risk.” Family history is the biggest red flag. Three or more relatives with the same or related cancers, two relatives diagnosed with any cancer at a young age, or one relative with two or more cancers. Using these as a starting point may better the odds. “By employing these screening tests early and by counseling them on risk-reducing strategies, we can hopefully decrease the incidence of ovarian cancer,” says Dr. Sandadi. Genetic screening is a risky diagnosis. The BRCA gene and Lynch Syndrome greatly increase cancer risk, including breast, ovarian, uterine, and colorectal. Identifying an inherited mutation helps tailor treatment for people diagnosed with cancer, but may also prevent it in people who are not. “For example, if you have the BRCA gene and you’re at risk for ovarian cancer, we generally would have you do a transvaginal ultrasound once a year. We have a blood test called a CA125 we would check once a year.” Lynch Syndrome also triggers early colonoscopy. Many women will opt for preventative surgeries including hysterectomy and mastectomy, making it less likely they will ever face a female cancer. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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      • Full of Grace 31K

        03:03

        from Mark Pereira Added 90 0 0

        This video is about Full of Grace 31K

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        • Ovarian Cancer - Do YOU know the symptoms??

          01:47

          from BRCA Umbrella Added 2 0 0

          Do YOU know the symptoms of ovarian cancer - you do now. Watch and learn - it might save someones life!! Thanks to all the members of BRCA Umbrella who gave their time to help make this video. www.brcaumbrella.ning.com

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          • Getting a Read on Cancer Risk

            02:07

            from Lee Memorial Health System Added 6 0 0

            It should come as no surprise that in the same way we inherit many family traits, the risk of cancer may also pass from generation to generation. “So if we can identify any genetic mutation that we can use later on for therapy, it would be hugely beneficial,” says Dr. Samith Sandadi, who is a gynecologic oncologist on medical staff of Lee Memorial Health System. Doctors have long understood there was a genetic link to many cancers - including colorectal, breast, ovarian and uterine. But only recently tests were developed to look at the DNA fingerprints. The most well known screening involves the BRCA gene mutation. “It gives you a better overall picture of your risk of getting not only breast cancer, but gynecologic cancers,” says Dr. Sandadi. Looking into the genetics of cancer is not a far-fetched idea. The technology is available locally and more people are taking advantage. Mary Ann Orlang is a genetic counselor with Lee Memorial Health System’s Regional Cancer Center. “What I do is talk to women, men, who think they might be at risk for cancer, or they have already been diagnosed with cancer. We do a family tree and determine a criterion for genetic testing,” says Orlang. Tests involve either a blood or saliva sample. The cancer center screens for a handful of genetically-linked diseases including BRCA and Lynch syndrome, along with rare mutations that may lead to cancer. “We’ve learned so much more about the genetic link so we’re able to provide testing for people at risk,” says Orlang. Getting a read on risk can help doctors specialize treatment, or provide patients a chance to closely monitor or take preventative steps. “By employing these screening tests early and by counseling them on risk-reducing strategies, we can decrease the incidence of ovarian cancer,” says Dr. Sandadi. An inherited predisposition for cancer is information that can and should be passed down the family tree. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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            • Not So Soon (work in progress)

              04:36

              from Yoko Lance Added 103 1 1

              It was a cold winter morning. I picked up a phone call from my mother and she said she had been diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer. It was just over six years since she had had a mastectomy for her very early stages of breast cancer. I googled 'stage four ovarian cancer survival rate' straight away and it said there was only a ten percent 5-year cure/remission rate. Since Mum lost her husband three years ago, she has been saying that she does not want to live for long, “Five years, if I get five years, I don't need any more”. It was really hard to listen as a daughter who loved her so much. I sometimes cried and begged her not to say such horrible things. However, it didn’t change her at all. Although Mum still says that all she wants is five years, now she has decided to apply chemotherapy after the doctor told her that she would not live a year without it. However, one afternoon, I found out that she was still smoking. I cannot explain how furious I was at the time. "Taking chemotherapy and still smoking? Do you want to live or kill yourself? Why would you suffer this much to go through chemotherapy if you wanna die? Don't you know how serious this situation is now? You have only ten percent chance to live five years!" She made some silly excuses. A few days later, I found Mum was still smoking. Mum became really weak and fragile after a few months of chemotherapy. Her skin colour became dark, her nails became black, and she lost most of hair including her eye brows and eye lushes. She had pins and needles in her hands and feet all the time, and could not even walk on the tiled floor as it caused pain. She started using a walker to perform some easy house duties and for going out. She could not sit up and play with her laptop computer anymore like she used to do all the time. All she could do was hold an iPhone and play games. ‘It’s good to play games all day. That way I don’t have to think about anything. I would start crying otherwise’ It struck me, all of sudden. I realised how horrible an experience she had gone through. How hard her life has been. I thought I knew it, but I didn’t really understand it until she had become this weak. It must have been tremendously hard for Mum to face the harsh reality. Probably, that is why she tried to avoid facing it, saying ‘I don’t want to live for long’, smoking, and playing games all day. It is easy to say that Mum is silly. But this is the way she tries to ‘live’. Even though I still cannot agree with the smoking, I should be kinder towards her effort of denying the reality that death is approaching fast. Now it’s been a month after Mum completed her course of chemotherapy. She seemed to be regaining her strength day by day. Much of her hair started growing back as well. Once, the cancer showed how fragile the human body is, however, now mum is proving how resilient life can be.

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              • Ovarian Cancer Canada- Make a Difference

                00:32

                from Sophie Serafino Added 58 1 0

                Ovarian Cancer Canada spokesperson Sophie Serafino in a Public Service Awareness Announcement- Ovarian Cancer Canada- Make a Difference

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                • Ovarian Cancer Signs & Symptoms

                  01:00

                  from Pink Kong Studios Added 15.5K 6 1

                  This is a video to raise awareness of Ovarian Cancer. For more information go to: www.ovarian-cancer.ie www.sock.ie www.ovacare.com Sound Design: www.studio4dublin.com

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                  • Molecular profiling of chemoresistant ovarian tumors: discussion with Dr. Martina Bazzaro on changes at the cellular level

                    04:14

                    from Emil Lou, MD, PhD, FACP Added 40 0 0

                    This is my discussion with Martina Bazzaro, Ph.D, researcher in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at the University of Minnesota. Here, she shares information on how she and her research team obtain and process tumors from human patients with ovarian cancer and perform genomic profiling in the lab to evaluate differences in chemosensitive vs. chemoresistant disease. Here is Dr. Bazzaro's profile on the UMN website: http://www.obgyn.umn.edu/faculty-staff/gynecologic-oncology-faculty/martina-bazzaro/ Here is a link to her team's publication on "Method for Obtaining Primary Ovarian Cancer Cells From Solid Specimens" -via the JOVE website: https://www.jove.com/video/51581/method-for-obtaining-primary-ovarian-cancer-cells-from-solid-specimens

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                    • Mouse Avatars: Discussion with Dr. Timothy Starr on the Road to Personalized Medicine in Ovarian Cancer

                      04:00

                      from Emil Lou, MD, PhD, FACP Added 25 0 0

                      This is my discussion with Tim Starr, Ph.D, a cancer researcher in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at the University of MInnesota (http://www.med.umn.edu/starrlab/). Our topic of conversation in this segment is Mouse Avatars, which are a highly novel approach to studying response of ovarian (and other) cancers to chemotherapies. In this model, investigators grow small portions of the tumor in mouse 'avatars' and assess response to these treatments. The ultimate goal is to determine whether the response of the tumor to specific therapies in the avatars can predict response of the tumors in the actual human patient.

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