1. Nuclear: Inside a New Plant, Getting Small & the State of the Industry - 02.27.2011

    30:00

    from Energy NOW / Added

    155 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Nuclear's New Look: Is the U.S. on the verge of a nuclear renaissance? No new power generating reactors have come online in 15 years, but that's about to change. Correspondent Lee Patrick Sullivan goes inside the Tennessee Valley Authority's Watts Bar Unit 2, which is expected to switch on by 2013. A plant engineer gives him a tour, including an up-close and personal look at both the plant's 1.21 gigawatt generator -- and why she became an engineer herself. Plugged In: United Parcel Service plans to augment its fleet with trucks powered by liquefied natural gas... Scientists want to know if a spate of dead dolphins washing ashore on the Gulf Coast is related to last year's oil spill… And the political crisis in Libya led to a spike in oil prices unseen since 2008. Could the price of a barrel get any higher? Mini Nuke Reactors: Technologists have designed a new generation of nuclear reactors that can power several thousand homes and might be safer than large reactors. Special correspondent Daniel Sieberg visits two reactors: one that could provide electricity to a small town and one that's recycling nuclear waste from the Cold War. Engineers at those plants explain why so-called small modular reactors could be the next big thing. Energy Then: We bring you the fanfare surrounding the opening of the nation's first commercial-scale nuclear power plant in the 1950s, and how one family found this new form of power appetizing. Hot Zone: Be "on the scene" at the demolition of a coal-burning power plant in Washington state, one that supported construction of the first atom bomb and later, plutonium enrichment. The Mix: Alex Flint, senior vice president of government affairs at the nuclear industry lobby group Nuclear Energy Institute, and Christopher Paine, director of the nuclear program at the environmental advocacy group Natural Resources Defense Council, go supercritical on the topic of U.S. commercial nuclear power. America has struggled with the old questions surrounding nuclear power for a long time -- and is beginning to cope with the new ones.

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    • Japan's Nuclear Crisis and U.S. Safety - 03.20.2011

      30:00

      from Energy NOW / Added

      83 Plays / / 0 Comments

      NUCLEAR NATION: Following a devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, one of its nuclear power plants is on the verge of multiple meltdowns. Now, many in this country are asking whether U.S. plants can withstand such a disaster. Chief correspondent Tyler Suiters looks at how American nuclear plants could be vulnerable. THE MIX: HOW DO GOVERNMENTS HANDLE A NUCLEAR CRISIS? Thalia Assuras interviews U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) for a preview of possible federal action in the wake of Japan's emergency. Blackburn sits on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and her state is home to three working nuclear reactors as well as the only reactor under construction in the U.S. THE MIX: SAFETY AND REGULATION IN THE NUCLEAR INDUSTRY: Thalia speaks with Jarret Adams, spokesman for nuclear reactor manufacturer Areva, to find out how the nuclear industry can learn from Japan. Peter Bradford, a former NRC commissioner, thinks regulators are under pressure from Congress to keep plants running. And Arnie Gunderson, a nuclear engineer on a Vermont Yankee nuclear plant oversight panel, predicts many older plants wouldn't pass modern seismic evaluations. ENERGY THEN: FIRST NUCLEAR REACTOR: A newsreel from 1957 documents the opening of the nation's first privately-owned nuclear plant, in California, and touts the benefits of "power from a pioneer source." THE NEXT FRONTIER: "Mini nukes:" They're not something out of a spy thriller, they're a new generation of nuclear reactors that can power several thousand homes and might be safer than large reactors. Special correspondent Daniel Sieberg looks at this promising new technology that could make carbon-free energy cheaper, safer, and easier to build. THE HOT ZONE: UNDERWATER NUKES: France, which gets 80 percent of its power from nuclear, is looking at submerging small, modular reactors underwater as a way to increase safety. Some engineers there believe underwater reactors are less vulnerable to earthquakes or other natural disasters.

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      • The Blackhawk Project, LLC

        05:51

        from David Butler / Added

        71 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Located in Eagle, Idaho The Blackhawk Project, LLC has designed and built a unique prototype wind turbine. The design is a marriage of helicopter roter head technology and wind turbines. The electrical generator was designed from scratch and uses proprietary technology that allows a lot of power to be generated at a very low speed. Video - Idaho Department of Commerce Editing - Dave Butler

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        • Central Oregon Irrigation District - Hydroelectric Power

          06:23

          from Richard Scott Nelson / Added

          881 Plays / / 0 Comments

          For 115 years, COID has been a forward thinking organization that has always sought effective and innovative ways to deliver water to it's patrons. The tradition continues today with their 2nd Hydro-Electric facility, Juniper Ridge on the Pilot Butte Canal.

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          • Japan's Nuclear Crisis and U.S. Safety - 03.20.2011

            30:00

            from Energy NOW / Added

            98 Plays / / 0 Comments

            NUCLEAR NATION: Following a devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, one of its nuclear power plants is on the verge of multiple meltdowns. Now, many in this country are asking whether U.S. plants can withstand such a disaster. Chief correspondent Tyler Suiters looks at how American nuclear plants could be vulnerable. THE MIX: HOW DO GOVERNMENTS HANDLE A NUCLEAR CRISIS? Thalia Assuras interviews U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) for a preview of possible federal action in the wake of Japan's emergency. Blackburn sits on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and her state is home to three working nuclear reactors as well as the only reactor under construction in the U.S. THE MIX: SAFETY AND REGULATION IN THE NUCLEAR INDUSTRY: Thalia speaks with Jarret Adams, spokesman for nuclear reactor manufacturer Areva, to find out how the nuclear industry can learn from Japan. Peter Bradford, a former NRC commissioner, thinks regulators are under pressure from Congress to keep plants running. And Arnie Gunderson, a nuclear engineer on a Vermont Yankee nuclear plant oversight panel, predicts many older plants wouldn't pass modern seismic evaluations. ENERGY THEN: FIRST NUCLEAR REACTOR: A newsreel from 1957 documents the opening of the nation's first privately-owned nuclear plant, in California, and touts the benefits of "power from a pioneer source." THE NEXT FRONTIER: "Mini nukes:" They're not something out of a spy thriller, they're a new generation of nuclear reactors that can power several thousand homes and might be safer than large reactors. Special correspondent Daniel Sieberg looks at this promising new technology that could make carbon-free energy cheaper, safer, and easier to build. THE HOT ZONE: UNDERWATER NUKES: France, which gets 80 percent of its power from nuclear, is looking at submerging small, modular reactors underwater as a way to increase safety. Some engineers there believe underwater reactors are less vulnerable to earthquakes or other natural disasters.

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            • Power

              03:34

              from F.Forberg / Added

              91.2K Plays / / 59 Comments

              LOW FREQUENCIES – TURN VOLUME DOWN ON PORTABLE DEVICES An excavation, gigatons in motion. In the extraterrestrial view magnetic field resonances mix up with power line frequencies. A planet is examined, microscopically, zoomed in from afar. Dimensions without scale. Energy harvest permanently. The earth, a megalopolis is making megawatt.

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              • #018 God's Benefit Package, Pt 2; Guest Timothy Martin

                01:07:00

                from WorldImprovement / Added

                118 Plays / / 0 Comments

                (Our website is: www.witts.ws for more information) Teaching: Sir Timothy Thrapp on God's Benefit Package, Pt 2 Guest: Timothy Martin Topic:

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                • Wild Horse Construction, Assembly and Scenic

                  18:35

                  from Puget Sound Energy / Added

                  359 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  The Wild Horse Wind and Solar Facility, located in Central Washington, is Puget Sound Energy's second wind-powered electric generation facility. It is also the utility's largest wind farm with 149 turbines. Wholly owned by PSE, Wild Horse has the capacity to generate up to 273 megawatts (MW) of electricity. Construction began in October 2005, and was completed in December 2006, with a 22-turbine, 44 MW expansion completed in 2009. According to the American Wind Energy Association, one megawatt of wind power capacity is equal to the electricity needs of 225 to 300 average U.S. homes. Turbines and Towers - 149 wind turbine generators, spanning across 9,000 acres near Ellensburg, Washington. - Towers are 221 ft high at the hub, 13.2 ft wide at the base and 7.6 ft wide at the top. Towers weigh 104 tons. - Each turbine consists of 3-blades, each 129 ft long, 11.62 ft at the widest and 1.6 ft at the tip with each blade weighing 14,300 lbs. The rotor (blades, hub and nose cone) weighs 42 tons. - Turbine generators are V80-1.8 MW and V80-2.0 MW machines manufactured by Vestas, a Danish company. Each generator can produce 690 volts, which is stepped-up to 34,500 volts by an on-board transformer. The generator is housed inside a fiberglass "nacelle." - The generator and nacelle together weigh 69 tons. Total height with a blade fully extended is 351 ft and total weight is approximately 270 tons. These are the largest wind turbine generators in Washington State. - Each tower foundation reaches a minimum depth of 25 ft and a maximum of 32 ft depending on bedrock depth and takes an average of 100 to 260 cubic yards of concrete. - Each foundation requires 120 anchor bolts that span from the surface of the ground to the bottom of the foundation. A single 28 ft anchor bolt weighs approximately 150 lbs. - Rotors turn 15.5 rpm, turning clockwise (front view) with a rotor diameter of 264 ft, larger than a wingspan of a Boeing 747. - Turbines can produce electricity at wind speeds as low as 9 mph, reaching their peak of production at 31 mph and shut down at constant wind speeds of 56 mph. The prevailing winds are from the northwest. - 127 turbines are capable of producing 1.8 megawatts and 22 turbines are capable of producing 2 megawatts, for a total facility capacity of 273 megawatts. More info at: http://www.pse.com/inyourcommunity/kittitas/Pages/Wild-Horse.aspx

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                  • Electric Power Generation : Test your Electrical Concepts

                    02:17

                    from Professional Engineer / Added

                    49 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    http://www.electricalquizzes.com How much you know about Electric Power Generation.Solve multiple choice questions and get the results.

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                    • Economics of Power Generation : Test your Electrical Concepts

                      02:17

                      from Professional Engineer / Added

                      25 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      http://www.electricalquizzes.com How much you know about Economics of Power Generation.Solve multiple choice questions and get the results.

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