1. "Close Up" (2006) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

    02:44

    from bitforms gallery / Added

    "Close Up", 2006 Shadow Box 2 LCD screen, video camera, custom software, 2 computers 31 1/2 x 41 x 5” / 80 x 104 x 13 cm edition of 6, 1 AP Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

    + More details
    • "Cardinal Directions" (2010) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

      01:52

      from bitforms gallery / Added

      "Cardinal Directions," 2010 Surveillance monitor, embedded computer, infrared sensors, robotic actuator, slip ring, stainless steel support, custom software, metal certificate 51.1" x 11.8" x 11.8" / 130 x 30 x 30 cm, free-standing sculpture edition of 12, 1 AP A small surveillance monitor on a stainless-steel stand rotates automatically to reveal a geolocalized poem. As the public walk around the piece it shows the cardinal directions and a text locked to them. The text is an excerpt from Vicente Huidobro's epic poem "Altazor" (1919-1931), which reads "The four cardinal directions are three: North and South". Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

      + More details
      • "Body Movies" at Te Papa Museum (2008) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

        06:06

        from bitforms gallery / Added

        "Body Movies," 2000 Relational Architecture 6 outdoor public installation dimensions variable Installation view at Te Papa Museum, Wellington, New Zealand. Thousands of portraits, taken on the streets of the cities where the project is shown, are projected on a giant screen or façade using elevated robotically-controlled projectors. However, the portraits are completely washed out by powerful xenon light sources placed at ground level. When people cross the square their shadows appear on the screen and the portraits are revealed within them. The shadows and portraits generate a play of reverse puppetry and embodied representation. Silhouettes measure between 2 and 30 metres high, depending on how far participants are from the screen. A camera-based tracking system monitors the location of the shadows in real time. The computer vision interface, which is shown and explained on the site, triggers quiet feedback sounds when a shadow and a portrait match in scale. When the shadows have revealed all the portraits in a given scene, an automatic command is issued to change the scene to the next set of portraits. This way the people on the square are invited to match different representational narratives. Over 60 people may take part at any given time, creating a collective experience that nonetheless allows discrete individual participation. "Body Movies" is the sixth in the series of “relational architecture” installations that Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has designed for cities in Europe and America for the past ten years. These interactive interventions have been exploring the intersection between new technologies, public space and performance art. The piece attempts to create an anti-monument of alien presence and embodied relationships. Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

        + More details
        • "Body Movies" at Liverpool Biennial (2002) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

          03:33

          from bitforms gallery / Added

          "Body Movies," 2000 Relational Architecture 6 outdoor public installation dimensions variable Installation view at Liverpool Biennial, Williamson Square, Liverpool, UK. Thousands of portraits, taken on the streets of the cities where the project is shown, are projected on a giant screen or façade using elevated robotically-controlled projectors. However, the portraits are completely washed out by powerful xenon light sources placed at ground level. When people cross the square their shadows appear on the screen and the portraits are revealed within them. The shadows and portraits generate a play of reverse puppetry and embodied representation. Silhouettes measure between 2 and 30 metres high, depending on how far participants are from the screen. A camera-based tracking system monitors the location of the shadows in real time. The computer vision interface, which is shown and explained on the site, triggers quiet feedback sounds when a shadow and a portrait match in scale. When the shadows have revealed all the portraits in a given scene, an automatic command is issued to change the scene to the next set of portraits. This way the people on the square are invited to match different representational narratives. Over 60 people may take part at any given time, creating a collective experience that nonetheless allows discrete individual participation. "Body Movies" is the sixth in the series of “relational architecture” installations that Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has designed for cities in Europe and America for the past ten years. These interactive interventions have been exploring the intersection between new technologies, public space and performance art. The piece attempts to create an anti-monument of alien presence and embodied relationships. Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

          + More details
          • "Body Movies" at Atlantico Pavillion (2002) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

            04:51

            from bitforms gallery / Added

            "Body Movies," 2000 Relational Architecture 6 outdoor public installation dimensions variable Installation view at Atlantico Pavillion, Lisbon, Portugal. Thousands of portraits, taken on the streets of the cities where the project is shown, are projected on a giant screen or façade using elevated robotically-controlled projectors. However, the portraits are completely washed out by powerful xenon light sources placed at ground level. When people cross the square their shadows appear on the screen and the portraits are revealed within them. The shadows and portraits generate a play of reverse puppetry and embodied representation. Silhouettes measure between 2 and 30 metres high, depending on how far participants are from the screen. A camera-based tracking system monitors the location of the shadows in real time. The computer vision interface, which is shown and explained on the site, triggers quiet feedback sounds when a shadow and a portrait match in scale. When the shadows have revealed all the portraits in a given scene, an automatic command is issued to change the scene to the next set of portraits. This way the people on the square are invited to match different representational narratives. Over 60 people may take part at any given time, creating a collective experience that nonetheless allows discrete individual participation. "Body Movies" is the sixth in the series of “relational architecture” installations that Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has designed for cities in Europe and America for the past ten years. These interactive interventions have been exploring the intersection between new technologies, public space and performance art. The piece attempts to create an anti-monument of alien presence and embodied relationships. Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

            + More details
            • "Body Movies" at Ars Electronica Festival (2002) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

              05:31

              from bitforms gallery / Added

              "Body Movies," 2000 Relational Architecture 6 projectors, computers, surveillance camera, custom software outdoor public installation dimensions variable Installation view at Ars Electronica Festival, OK Centrum, Linz, Austria. Thousands of portraits, taken on the streets of the cities where the project is shown, are projected on a giant screen or façade using elevated robotically-controlled projectors. However, the portraits are completely washed out by powerful xenon light sources placed at ground level. When people cross the square their shadows appear on the screen and the portraits are revealed within them. The shadows and portraits generate a play of reverse puppetry and embodied representation. Silhouettes measure between 2 and 30 metres high, depending on how far participants are from the screen. A camera-based tracking system monitors the location of the shadows in real time. The computer vision interface, which is shown and explained on the site, triggers quiet feedback sounds when a shadow and a portrait match in scale. When the shadows have revealed all the portraits in a given scene, an automatic command is issued to change the scene to the next set of portraits. This way the people on the square are invited to match different representational narratives. Over 60 people may take part at any given time, creating a collective experience that nonetheless allows discrete individual participation. "Body Movies" is the sixth in the series of “relational architecture” installations that Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has designed for cities in Europe and America for the past ten years. These interactive interventions have been exploring the intersection between new technologies, public space and performance art. The piece attempts to create an anti-monument of alien presence and embodied relationships. Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

              + More details
              • "Body Movies" at Museum of Art, Hong Kong (2006) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

                03:44

                from bitforms gallery / Added

                "Body Movies," 2000 Relational Architecture 6 outdoor public installation dimensions variable Installation view the Museum of Art, HK Arts Development Council, Hong Kong, China. Thousands of portraits, taken on the streets of the cities where the project is shown, are projected on a giant screen or façade using elevated robotically-controlled projectors. However, the portraits are completely washed out by powerful xenon light sources placed at ground level. When people cross the square their shadows appear on the screen and the portraits are revealed within them. The shadows and portraits generate a play of reverse puppetry and embodied representation. Silhouettes measure between 2 and 30 metres high, depending on how far participants are from the screen. A camera-based tracking system monitors the location of the shadows in real time. The computer vision interface, which is shown and explained on the site, triggers quiet feedback sounds when a shadow and a portrait match in scale. When the shadows have revealed all the portraits in a given scene, an automatic command is issued to change the scene to the next set of portraits. This way the people on the square are invited to match different representational narratives. Over 60 people may take part at any given time, creating a collective experience that nonetheless allows discrete individual participation. "Body Movies" is the sixth in the series of “relational architecture” installations that Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has designed for cities in Europe and America for the past ten years. These interactive interventions have been exploring the intersection between new technologies, public space and performance art. The piece attempts to create an anti-monument of alien presence and embodied relationships. Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

                + More details
                • "Body Movies" at Duisburg Akzente Festival (2003) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

                  05:22

                  from bitforms gallery / Added

                  "Body Movies," 2000 Relational Architecture 6 outdoor public installation dimensions variable Installation view at Duisburg Akzente Festival, Duisburg, Germany. Thousands of portraits, taken on the streets of the cities where the project is shown, are projected on a giant screen or façade using elevated robotically-controlled projectors. However, the portraits are completely washed out by powerful xenon light sources placed at ground level. When people cross the square their shadows appear on the screen and the portraits are revealed within them. The shadows and portraits generate a play of reverse puppetry and embodied representation. Silhouettes measure between 2 and 30 metres high, depending on how far participants are from the screen. A camera-based tracking system monitors the location of the shadows in real time. The computer vision interface, which is shown and explained on the site, triggers quiet feedback sounds when a shadow and a portrait match in scale. When the shadows have revealed all the portraits in a given scene, an automatic command is issued to change the scene to the next set of portraits. This way the people on the square are invited to match different representational narratives. Over 60 people may take part at any given time, creating a collective experience that nonetheless allows discrete individual participation. "Body Movies" is the sixth in the series of “relational architecture” installations that Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has designed for cities in Europe and America for the past ten years. These interactive interventions have been exploring the intersection between new technologies, public space and performance art. The piece attempts to create an anti-monument of alien presence and embodied relationships. Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

                  + More details
                  • "Blow Up" (2007) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

                    01:57

                    from bitforms gallery / Added

                    "Blow Up," 2007 Shadow Box 4 LCD screen, video camera, custom software, computer 31 1/2 x 41 x 5” / 80 x 104 x 13 cm edition of 6, 1 AP "Blow-up" is a high resolution interactive display that is designed to fragment a surveillance camera view into 2400 virtual cameras that zoom into the exhibition space in fluid and autonomous motion. Inspired by Antonioni, the piece is intended as an exercise to underline the construction of presence through a simulated, live compound eye. Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

                    + More details
                    • "Amodal Suspension" (2003) by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

                      06:04

                      from bitforms gallery / Added

                      "Amodal Suspension", 2003 Relational Architecture 8 outdoor public installation twenty 7kW robotic searchlights, eight webcams, projectors, Linux servers, GPS and 3D DMX Java interface dimensions variable (visibility within a 15 km radius) Installation view at Yamaguchi Center for Art and Media, Yamaguchi, Japan. Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s public installation, "Amodal Suspension", was created to commemorate the opening of Japan’s Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media in 2003. Designed as a large-scale interactive installation, the public could use the website www.amodal.net to send short text messages to each other using a cell phone or web browser, however, rather than being sent directly, the messages were encoded as unique sequences of flashes with 20 robotically-controlled searchlights, turning the sky around Yamaguchi into a giant communication switchboard. Inspired in part by the Tanabata tradition of hanging wishes on bamboo, the project received over 400,000 unique visitors from 94 countries. Video courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery nyc. To learn more about Lozano-Hemmer's work, please visit: bit.ly/pSbJgx bit.ly/HeemCA

                      + More details

                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."