1. Green City, Clean Waters 9 minute Overview

    09:35

    from GreenTreks Network Added 7,121 14 2

    When it rains in the City of Brotherly Love, problems soon follow because more than half the city has "combined" sewers - pipes that carry both storm water and sewage. When it rains, the system fills quickly. The surplus, which includes raw sewage and road oil, backs up into basements and gushes untreated into rivers through 164 overflow pipes. Instead of going the route of many other cities and building miles-long, multibillion-dollar tunnels to hold storm-water overflows--and then pumping it back into the system when the rain stops--Philadelphia's 20-year stormwater management plan is based on "green infrastructure" and offers benefits that can be appreciated above the ground. Philadelphia's plan envisions transforming the city into an oasis of rain gardens, green roofs, treescapes, and porous pavements, which advocates say is cheaper than tunnels and makes for a more liveable, prettier city with higher property values and better community health.

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    • From the Field: Capturing stormwater naturally in Lancaster, Pennsylvania

      02:13

      from Chesapeake Bay Program Added

      June 2012: Fritz Schroeder, Director of LIVE Green Lancaster (a program of the Lancaster County Conservancy), explains how the city is using green infrastructure to capture stormwater runoff before it makes its way to the Chesapeake Bay. Learn more at www.chesapeakebay.net Produced by Steve Droter Music: "Joke" by Jahzzar

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      • Green City, Clean Water - The Full Story

        28:31

        from GreenTreks Network Added 1,088 2 0

        This in-depth version of the Green City, Clean Waters story lasts 28-1/2 minutes and has aired on Public Television in Philadelphia and other markets. If you're interested in bringing it to your area, give us a yell and we'll help facilitate the process however we can. In the meantime, view in Couch Mode and enjoy! When it rains in the City of Brotherly Love, problems soon follow because more than half the city has "combined" sewers - pipes that carry both storm water and sewage. When it rains, the system fills quickly. The surplus, which includes raw sewage and road oil, backs up into basements and gushes untreated into rivers through 164 overflow pipes. Instead of going the route of many other cities and building miles-long, multibillion-dollar tunnels to hold storm-water overflows--and then pumping it back into the system when the rain stops--Philadelphia's 20-year stormwater management plan is based on "green infrastructure" and offers benefits that can be appreciated above the ground. Philadelphia's plan envisions transforming the city into an oasis of rain gardens, green roofs, treescapes, and porous pavements, which advocates say is cheaper than tunnels and makes for a more liveable, prettier city with higher property values and better community health.

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        • Save our Urban Creeks

          02:08

          from Tualatin Riverkeepers Added 1,375 1 0

          When it rains, water runs off of the urban landscape, down storm drains, through pipes, to the nearest stream. These drains carry all sorts of pollutants. This includes oil, toxic waste, trash, and nutrients that promote harmful algae blooms. But even if the runoff from our streets was perfectly clean, it would still be a problem. Our urban landscape is covered with buildings, streets, and parking lots. These impervious surfaces make water run off rapidly, causing erosion. Rapid runoff also stirs up legacy pollutants and sediments harmful to fish and other aquatic life. Over the years we have steadily increased these problems by the way we developed our urban landscape with rooftops, pavement, drains and storm sewers connected directly to streams. In contrast with an urban landscape, a natural landscape is dominated by trees and plants that intercept rain. Soils rich in organic matter absorb water like a sponge. It's time to make our urban landscape handle rainwater more like nature - using green infrastructure like ecoroofs, bioswales and porous pavement - letting rain into the ground, be taken up by plants, evaporate into the air, or be stored for later use. Not only is green infrastructure good for our streams, it can also save energy and money, and it is often beautiful. Innovative cities have been developing and testing green infrastructure for more than 30 years. Now we know how to reduce polluted stormwater runoff. But in order to make this change happen we need grassroots action to stop pollution and save our streams. Never before have we been so ready to transform the urban landscape to improve the health of our urban streams. Tualatin Riverkeepers is your voice for clean water and is prepared to advance the transformation of our urban landscape and the public policy that supports it. www.tualatinriverkeepers.org

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          • Rain Garden

            02:14

            from Friends of the Cedar River Water Added 78 1 0

            Ten bathtubs full of water. That’s how much rain pours off one average-size house during a good-sized drenching; 26,600 gallons of runoff a year. To maintain the stormwater pollution drainage system is very expensive. What if we could slow down the rain water and infiltrate it on site? We did. It’s called a rain garden.

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            • From the Field: Building rain gardens with youth in Howard County, Md.

              03:01

              from Chesapeake Bay Program Added

              September 2012: This summer the READY program (Restoring the Environment and Developing Youth) provided green jobs to young adults, while helping Howard County work toward meeting stormwater regulations to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Partners include Howard County, Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, PATH (People Acting Together in Howard), Parks & People Foundation, and UMCES Maryland Sea Grant. Produced by Steve Droter Music: "Petit Talibe" by Löhstana David

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              • Green Homes

                07:15

                from GreenTreks Network Added 1,114 1 0

                Since residential roof tops account for a pretty significant amount of impervious cover, Green Homes is an element of the Philadelphia Water Department's ambitious Green City, Clean Waters program to which anyone can relate. PWD is working with homeowners to help them initiate projects to lessen the amount of rainwater that runs from rooftops into the City's storm drains, because this rooftop runoff adds more water than the sewer system can handle during flash storms--resulting in polluted water flowing into local streams, rivers, and creeks. Green Homes brings small-scale solutions to the City's neighborhoods: projects like installing rain barrels, rain gardens, and flow-through planters to capture runoff when it rains. For the more ambitious, actions might include de-paving, planting trees, or building green roofs. Becoming the greenest city in America means everybody is doing their part. To learn more about stormwater, go to http://www.StormwaterPA.org.

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                • Albany Park Community Center uses rain gardens to combat flooding

                  01:48

                  from Jessica DuBois-Maahs Added 7 0 0

                  This was completed for my Methods Fall 2012 class.

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                  • IHDC 2012 Podcasts Keynote Prof Dr Peter Hoeppe

                    21:31

                    from RESET Development Added 25 0 0

                    Prof Dr Peter Hoeppe, Director of Munich RE's Climate Risks Research Centre, explains why and how the insurance industry could be adopting an ecosystem services approach to risk and reinsurance - for climate change adaptation in towns, cities and megacities all over the world.

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                    • TCTV April 2009 - Thurston County Raingardens - Examples

                      15:48

                      from Thurston Webmaster Added 30 0 0

                      Thurston Community Television show on Thurston County Raingardens. What they are, techniques for cultivation, and examples of successful raingardens. Hosted by Thurston County Commissioners.

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