1. Albany Park Community Center uses rain gardens to combat flooding

    01:48

    from Jessica DuBois-Maahs / Added

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    This was completed for my Methods Fall 2012 class.

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    • From the Field: Building rain gardens with youth in Howard County, Md.

      03:01

      from Chesapeake Bay Program / Added

      1,655 Plays / / 0 Comments

      September 2012: This summer the READY program (Restoring the Environment and Developing Youth) provided green jobs to young adults, while helping Howard County work toward meeting stormwater regulations to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Partners include Howard County, Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, PATH (People Acting Together in Howard), Parks & People Foundation, and UMCES Maryland Sea Grant. Produced by Steve Droter Music: "Petit Talibe" by Löhstana David

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      • From the Field: Capturing stormwater naturally in Lancaster, Pennsylvania

        02:13

        from Chesapeake Bay Program / Added

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        June 2012: Fritz Schroeder, Director of LIVE Green Lancaster (a program of the Lancaster County Conservancy), explains how the city is using green infrastructure to capture stormwater runoff before it makes its way to the Chesapeake Bay. Learn more at www.chesapeakebay.net Produced by Steve Droter Music: "Joke" by Jahzzar

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        • Green City, Clean Waters 9 minute Overview

          09:35

          from GreenTreks Network / Added

          7,073 Plays / / 2 Comments

          When it rains in the City of Brotherly Love, problems soon follow because more than half the city has "combined" sewers - pipes that carry both storm water and sewage. When it rains, the system fills quickly. The surplus, which includes raw sewage and road oil, backs up into basements and gushes untreated into rivers through 164 overflow pipes. Instead of going the route of many other cities and building miles-long, multibillion-dollar tunnels to hold storm-water overflows--and then pumping it back into the system when the rain stops--Philadelphia's 20-year stormwater management plan is based on "green infrastructure" and offers benefits that can be appreciated above the ground. Philadelphia's plan envisions transforming the city into an oasis of rain gardens, green roofs, treescapes, and porous pavements, which advocates say is cheaper than tunnels and makes for a more liveable, prettier city with higher property values and better community health.

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          • Green City, Clean Water - The Full Story

            28:31

            from GreenTreks Network / Added

            1,053 Plays / / 0 Comments

            This in-depth version of the Green City, Clean Waters story lasts 28-1/2 minutes and has aired on Public Television in Philadelphia and other markets. If you're interested in bringing it to your area, give us a yell and we'll help facilitate the process however we can. In the meantime, view in Couch Mode and enjoy! When it rains in the City of Brotherly Love, problems soon follow because more than half the city has "combined" sewers - pipes that carry both storm water and sewage. When it rains, the system fills quickly. The surplus, which includes raw sewage and road oil, backs up into basements and gushes untreated into rivers through 164 overflow pipes. Instead of going the route of many other cities and building miles-long, multibillion-dollar tunnels to hold storm-water overflows--and then pumping it back into the system when the rain stops--Philadelphia's 20-year stormwater management plan is based on "green infrastructure" and offers benefits that can be appreciated above the ground. Philadelphia's plan envisions transforming the city into an oasis of rain gardens, green roofs, treescapes, and porous pavements, which advocates say is cheaper than tunnels and makes for a more liveable, prettier city with higher property values and better community health.

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            • Green Homes

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              from GreenTreks Network / Added

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              Since residential roof tops account for a pretty significant amount of impervious cover, Green Homes is an element of the Philadelphia Water Department's ambitious Green City, Clean Waters program to which anyone can relate. PWD is working with homeowners to help them initiate projects to lessen the amount of rainwater that runs from rooftops into the City's storm drains, because this rooftop runoff adds more water than the sewer system can handle during flash storms--resulting in polluted water flowing into local streams, rivers, and creeks. Green Homes brings small-scale solutions to the City's neighborhoods: projects like installing rain barrels, rain gardens, and flow-through planters to capture runoff when it rains. For the more ambitious, actions might include de-paving, planting trees, or building green roofs. Becoming the greenest city in America means everybody is doing their part. To learn more about stormwater, go to http://www.StormwaterPA.org.

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              • IHDC 2012 Awards at the Natural History Museum

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                from RESET Development / Added

                31 Plays / / 0 Comments

                On 15th October 2012, the Natural History Museum London hosted the IHDC 2012 Conference, Exhibtion and Awards Ceremony. Dr Michael Dixon, NHM Director, welcomed attendees to the Darwin Centre, where Awards were given by Lord de Mauley of Defra, representing Gold Sponsors the UK government's Green Infrastructure Partnership, Gary Grant Chair of IHDC, and Jo Mayer of Ecobuild. Brian McDonald, Nature Improvements Area lead at natural England and one of the IHDC judges, spoke of the value of the competition in inspiring better design and implementation, and Dusty Gedge, President of the European Federation of Green Roof Associations and IHDC co-instigator, spoke of the importance of continuing the work that has been started to adppt ecosystem services as an approach in urban design, planning and implementation. www.IHDC.org.uk

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                • IHDC 2012 Podcast 11 Dusty Gedge - Retrofitting Green Infrastructure in London

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                  from RESET Development / Added

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                  Green roof expert, designer and policy instigator Dusty Gedge on ondon's retrofit approach to Green Infrastructure over the last 15 years - and the successes that have been achieved

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                  • IHDC 2012 Podcast 04 Gary Grant - The Principles of an Ecosystem Services Approach

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                    from RESET Development / Added

                    43 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Gary Grant, ecologist, masterplanner, designer, and author, Director of the Green Roof Consultancy and Chair of the IHDC, on the fundamental principles of designing towns and cities to provide ecosystem services - to support nature and help us adapt to climate change

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                    • IHDC 2012 Podcasts 09 David Partridge - Green Infrastructure in the King's Cross Redevelopment

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                      from RESET Development / Added

                      6 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      David Partridge, Joint CEO of Argent Group, talks about the King's Cross redevelopment and how Green Infrastructure was a central part of the approach

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