1. Facing Tear Gas and the Egyptian Revolution - War Resisters League Campaign Against Tear Gas and Militarization with Ali Issa

    08:33

    from War Resisters League Added 131 1 0

    War Resisters League is building a campaign against tear gas. Watch this video, where national field organizer Ali Issa breaks down the what, why and how of this campaign, as it tries to link movements from Egypt to Oakland to Quebec to Greece, as well as the skyrocketing militarization of the police in cities all over the US, through focus on this one chemical weapon. To learn of more stories of tear gas and movement, and contribute your own, please visit: http://facingteargas.tumblr.com. For more on tear gas generally see: http://www.warresisters.org/facingteargas *This talk was recorded July 10th, 2012, in New York City at a report back from a delegation of the National Lawyers Guild Delegation to Egypt, sponsored by the Coalition to Defend the Egyptian Revolution. Thanks to Joe Friendly for the footage. http://www.nlg.org/news/announcements/national-lawyers-guild-delegation-returns-from-egypt-with-evidence-of-systematic-human-rights-abuses-calls-for-transparency-and-accountability-from-u-s-government/ http://www.defendegyptianrevolution.org/

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    • ARTICLE: Occupy Wall Street: flowers vs. batons

      00:50

      from How to Change the World? (HCW?) Added

      youtube channel about OWS: youtube.com/globalchange1234 APRIL 28, 2012 Repression being perpetrated by the NYPD (New York Police Department) towards the Occupy Wall Street movement is nonstop and increasing. Careless of the tens of reporters and live-streamers all around, the police keeps arresting daily an increasing number of peaceful protesters, often without even having a valid reason to do it. A quick research on Youtube is all it takes to find hundreds of such episodes. And tension is rising, as we get closer to May the 1st, the day in which the Occupiers, along with the unions, are planning the second USA general strike since 1946: a historic event. Arrests seem to be used not only to scare protesters and supporters, but to also impoverish the already poor movement’s funds, so that they won’t have enough money to organize the event. I’ve come back to Italy for a few days now, after 3 months side by side with the occupiers, about whom I’m shooting a documentary; I’ve lived March 17th’s repression when, during the celebrations we were having for the first six months since the beginning of the occupation, we were kicked out of Zuccotti Plaza, tens of people have been assaulted, hit and arrested; a woman whose only guilt was to be inside the park, sitting still and peaceful, has left on an ambulance after she’s waited for oxygen lying on the sidewalk; people who got arrested have been piled up in the middle of the street, face to the floor and cuffs behind their backs, and were taken away on a public service bus; journalists have been arrested just for being there doing their job, and if I got out of there unharmed, I owe it only to my guardian angel, Eric: an occupier whose only worry during the whole day (and for the following days) was to stay right behind me to carry me away in case of emergency. Where emergency (danger) means not only getting arrested with absolutely no reason, but also being charged at by 8-10 policemen, hit bare-handed and with batons or charged at with the iron barricades very often used by NYPD to delimitate their areas of intervention, in order to keep at distance any other protesters, reporters, cameras, mobile phones, information and human rights. Intimidations and injustices were perpetrated also during the days before: people arrested because they were singing, or sitting down in a park where it’s legit to be sitting down, or offering a flower to a policeman, or for indicating a policeman – with a green pedestrian crossing light – the road the march was about to enter, or… I was stalked for a week, just for being a filmmaker interested in a court hearing in which an occupier was involved. I’ve been followed, recorded and taken pictures at night and day, on the street, on the subway, in bar and restaurants. They’ve tried to intimidate me, and they managed to, at first: I was about to run back to Italy. I was worried especially for the NDAA (National Defense Authorization Act: a law for the authorization and financing of National Defense) which allows in the USA, from this year on, military detention indefinitely and without regular trial, applying war-laws to the American territory. Signed by Nobel peace prize winner Barack Obama, I suppose trying to go unnoticed, on December 31st, 2011. This law states that if you’re even suspected of somehow being linked to terroristic activities (and “terrorism” here is extremely indefinite and no-one really knows what it includes. Nelson Mandela, for example, was removed from this terrorist list only in 2008) or if you happen to be suspected of belligerence against the government (again, without actually defining this term) you can get arrested, detained and deported, without anyone knowing where you are, with no right to a lawyer nor a court (that means no expressed or proven suspects). You simply disappear until the conflict is over, and if the conflict is against terrorism, I doubt there’ll ever be a ceasing date for the “war”. And all of this stands both for American and foreign citizens. This law, along with the construction of new detention fields in the United States and renewing of others, added to the aggressive attitude of the NYPD, added to the government policy, which keeps making laws to actually forbid protests, added to being stalked day in and day out, has literally paralyzed me for three days, during which I even stopped taping and showing up in Zuccotti Plaza. And, if I overcame fear, if I hadn’t run back to Italy, if I otherwise have extended my stay for 40 days more, is only thanks to the occupiers and their contagious strength and energy. In fact, two have been the things that most shocked me during these 90 days of occupation: the repression by the police and the occupiers’ reaction. And this last one was the real miracle. I’ve never seen the movement getting weaker, or passively accepting, but instead I’ve seen it growing more and more both for determination and numerically. And it has given me a great pragmatic example of how to peacefully react to repression. How? Unmasking its stupidity, making it public, ridiculing its actions, singing the “evil” song from Star Wars when hundreds of policemen arrange in line every night to close Union Square park with barricades, talking to the policemen in line, asking them if this is the world they want to build, the world they wish to give to their children: a world where you get arrested for singing, a world where the human being is less important than money, a world where peaceful protesters get hit and arrested, a society that is destroying our Planet, contaminating food, starting wars for economical reasons, a world that doesn’t assist you when you’re sick, that lives over the people’s skins. For days, months, nonstop I’ve seen peaceful protesters being assaulted and arrested on a daily basis, still not giving up. They kept looking for a dialogue, some sort of communication between human beings. And I’ve seen confused policemen, with their eyes wide open, looking around them, listening, asking themselves questions. Among others gazing into space and chewing gum, there are some starting to have some doubts. I’ve seen a retired NYPD Captain (Captain Ray Lewis) who’s been arrested for civil disobedience, who’s going to the protests and on the streets wearing a pin with “Occupy” written on it. I’ve seen him in every march against police repression, speaking from the stage, being interviewed, thanking who thanked him to be there (“I’m the one thanking you! Without you, none of this could be possible”). Occupiers don’t give up. Because they believe in what they’re doing, because they’re not bribable, because they’re deeply convinced there’s no alternative other than changing this system we’re living into. Depending from the day and the event, there can be 30 or 2000 people, of different age, culture, ethnicity, religion. Every action and peaceful expression is welcome. I’ve seen a police charge being averted by meditation, flowers against batons, songs against barricades. And to this moment, there’s always been one winner. The occupiers. And even such a blind repression, increasing day-by-day, does nothing but showing the terror of power towards this colorful group of pacifists. The terror of contagion, that this strength and energy surrounding them wherever they are may one day spread around. From here, looking at last days’ repressions on the Internet, my very first instinct was to pay them back with their own coin. A thought that had never come to my mind while I was in New York. Because when you’re with the Wall Street’s occupiers, their contagious energy minimizes the situation, gives vent to rage and frustration with dances, hugs, songs (One! We are the people! – Two! We are united! – Three! The occupation IS NOT LEAVING!) and the voices increase the more the taunts increase, and solidarity increases the more the repression increases, and their strength is empowered by the fear the system is showing towards their existence. I’ve come back to Italy because my visa had expired. But I wish to go back to edit my documentary there. The American visa-system keeps me from going back immediately, and I’m trying to apply for a press-visa, this time. Will I manage? Or will my entrance in the USA be forbidden, as an unwanted guest, simply for having exercising my right to inform? It doesn’t mind. This time again the occupiers have won: come what may, my heart has now been “occupied”. (Chiara Cavallazzi)

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      • Holy She — Sunday Dress

        00:57

        from Holy She Added 96 0 0

        Mary shows off her new dress and the game she plays with it. Holy She is an early 90s home video show hosted by Mary, a 15-year-old pastor's daughter, and her secular friend Jesus. Although she tries to save souls, her honesty leads to unexpected revelations. http://cargocollective.com/alison/Films

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        • État Policier - Episode 3 - Etat privé ? - 10 juin 2012

          10:05

          from UNIVERSITV.TV Added

          Dimanche le 10 juin se déroulaient sur l'île Sainte-Hélène les dernières courses du Grand Prix de la Formule 1. Afin d’éviter toute forme de perturbation de cet évènement, et notamment dans le but de faire ostentation du sentiment de sécurité sur l’île, la Ville de Montréal, le SPVM, et voire même la STM, ont justifié le déploiement d’effectifs policiers d’une envergure rarement perçue à Montréal. Les agents de la paix surveillaient chaque station environnant l'événement. C'est donc entre les stations Berri-UQAM et Jean Drapeau que les forces de l’ordre se sont massivement déployées afin de « filtrer » les usagers du métro. De nombreux usagers ou spectateurs ont exprimé leurs préoccupations quant au profilage politique dont ils ont été témoin ou victime durant ces « filtrages ». Ceux-ci se justifiaient non seulement par le port d’un carré rouge, mais aussi par l’âge et l'accoutrement des individus. «Nous n’avions pas besoin de porter de carré rouge, on dirait qu’un jeune est forcément un étudiant et que par défaut, il présente une menace, - on était automatiquement fouillés », témoigne un jeune passant à la station Berri-UQAM. Des familles entières avec leurs enfants témoignent aussi avoir été la cible de fouilles préventives et s’être fait escorter jusqu’à la sortie du métro, se voyant ainsi interdire l’accès au service public de transport en commun en raison de la sécurité renforcée pour le Grand Prix. De nombreuses arrestations préventives ont alors été réalisées afin que la F1 ne soit pas perturbée. Pendant ce temps, un groupe de manifestants a pris la rue, du parc Émilie Gamelin jusqu'à la rue Crescent où se déroulaient les festivités liées au Grand Prix, qui ont été, depuis le 7 juin, perturbées chaque soir par des manifestations. Très vite, aux yeux des touristes et des participants du GP, la tension entre les policiers et les manifestants s'est exacerbée. Des médias officiels ont rapporté la force démesurée employée par le SPVM lors de certaines arrestations ayant eu lieu à ce moment-là. De plus, des expulsions d’individus voulant profiter d’autres activités tenues au parc Jean Drapeau ont également été critiquées par la population. En effet, les gens ont déploré que ce parc, étant un lieu public, ait été « privatisé » le temps du Grand Prix. D’autres se sont désolés de constater que la police, qui devrait être un « service public » ait été utilisée au profit d’une activité privée. Pourtant, l’administration de la Ville de Montréal, s’est montrée « très satisfaite » de cette gargantuesque opération de sécurisation menée par le SPVM pendant le Grand Prix qui s’est déroulé dans une humeur des plus festives .

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          • Cointelpro 101 Trailer

            01:31

            from Freedom Archives Added 402 2 0

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            • Syrian Field Hospital - Robert King

              02:25

              from Agencia Contacto Added 147 0 1

              May 15, 2012 - Al Qusayr, Homs, Syria: Three children were wounded after a rocket fired from the Syrian army exploded inside their home. Two young brothers and their sister are treated by Dr. Kasem and his team of volunteer doctors. Heavy fighting between the Free Syrian Army and the Syrian Army, now supported by Hezbollah fighters, left scores dead and many more wounded. Dr. Kasem and his team work inside a mobile field hospital clinic in the city under siege by government forces. Volunteer doctors and nurses face arrest, torture, and certain death if they are captured by the Syrian regime. These doctors work under harsh conditions with little medical supplies that are smuggled into the city from Lebanon.

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              • Police attack on photojournalists

                04:26

                from Shahidul Alam Added 207 0 0

                Police punched, kicked and beat with batons three photojournalists of the Bangla Daily Newspaper Prothom Alo. Nine police officers including Assistant Commisioner Shahidul Islam have been suspended for their involvement in the incident. The photographers were Khaled Sarker, Sajid Hossain and Zahidul Karim (Pathshala alumni). They were first taken to Hospital. Journalists from Prothom Alo want to Shere Bangla Police Station to register a case, which the police refused to accept.

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                • État Policier - Episode 2 - Nuit du 23 mai

                  07:01

                  from UNIVERSITV.TV Added

                  La nuit du 23 mai a été marquée par une énorme arrestation au coin St-denis et Sherbrooke. La police de Montréal et la SQ ont encerclé en moins de 3 minutes les manifestants leurs laissant aucune chance de se disperser, alors que ceux-ci commençaient à se diriger sur Sherbrooke Ouest. La police avait prévu son coup : des policiers de l'anti-émeute apparaissent à coté des manifestants 500 mètres avant le déploiement éclair de la SPVM, la SQ arrive en 30 seconde chrono sur les lieux, et les bus de la STM étaient déjà là ! Après avoir attaqué les médias, ils encerclent le plus de manifestants possible. Les 200 manifestants pacifistes ont été retenus plus de 3h, sans eau. La SPVM avait bloqué le quartier pour empêcher d'être déranger par quelconque citoyen ou média. Notre équipe réussie a se hisser sur un toit pour capter la répression. La police aurait obtenu l'itinéraire de la manifestation ce soir là... C'est une attaque très grave à la démocratie et une démonstration de la capacité de répression de l'état à grande échelle..

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                  • État Policier - Episode 1 - Nuit du 22 mai

                    12:08

                    from UNIVERSITV.TV Added

                    Montréal, la nuit du 22 mai 2012, après une énorme manifestation regroupant plus de 200 000 personnes s'opposant à la hausse des frais de scolarité et à la loi 78. Voici les événements qui se sont déroulés dans les rues de Montréal entre 21h30 et 2h du matin. Début de l'État policier.

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                    • ARTICLE: Occupy Wall Street: flowers vs. batons

                      00:50

                      from chiara cavallazzi Added 62 0 0

                      youtube channel about OWS: www.youtube.com/globalchange1234 APRIL 28, 2012 Repression being perpetrated by the NYPD (New York Police Department) towards the Occupy Wall Street movement is nonstop and increasing. Careless of the tens of reporters and live-streamers all around, the police keeps arresting daily an increasing number of peaceful protesters, often without even having a valid reason to do it. A quick research on Youtube is all it takes to find hundreds of such episodes. And tension is rising, as we get closer to May the 1st, the day in which the Occupiers, along with the unions, are planning the second USA general strike since 1946: a historic event. Arrests seem to be used not only to scare protesters and supporters, but to also impoverish the already poor movement’s funds, so that they won’t have enough money to organize the event. I’ve come back to Italy for a few days now, after 3 months side by side with the occupiers, about whom I’m shooting a documentary; I’ve lived March 17th’s repression when, during the celebrations we were having for the first six months since the beginning of the occupation, we were kicked out of Zuccotti Plaza, tens of people have been assaulted, hit and arrested; a woman whose only guilt was to be inside the park, sitting still and peaceful, has left on an ambulance after she’s waited for oxygen lying on the sidewalk; people who got arrested have been piled up in the middle of the street, face to the floor and cuffs behind their backs, and were taken away on a public service bus; journalists have been arrested just for being there doing their job, and if I got out of there unharmed, I owe it only to my guardian angel, Eric: an occupier whose only worry during the whole day (and for the following days) was to stay right behind me to carry me away in case of emergency. Where emergency (danger) means not only getting arrested with absolutely no reason, but also being charged at by 8-10 policemen, hit bare-handed and with batons or charged at with the iron barricades very often used by NYPD to delimitate their areas of intervention, in order to keep at distance any other protesters, reporters, cameras, mobile phones, information and human rights. Intimidations and injustices were perpetrated also during the days before: people arrested because they were singing, or sitting down in a park where it’s legit to be sitting down, or offering a flower to a policeman, or for indicating a policeman – with a green pedestrian crossing light – the road the march was about to enter, or… I was stalked for a week, just for being a filmmaker interested in a court hearing in which an occupier was involved. I’ve been followed, recorded and taken pictures at night and day, on the street, on the subway, in bar and restaurants. They’ve tried to intimidate me, and they managed to, at first: I was about to run back to Italy. I was worried especially for the NDAA (National Defense Authorization Act: a law for the authorization and financing of National Defense) which allows in the USA, from this year on, military detention indefinitely and without regular trial, applying war-laws to the American territory. Signed by Nobel peace prize winner Barack Obama, I suppose trying to go unnoticed, on December 31st, 2011. This law states that if you’re even suspected of somehow being linked to terroristic activities (and “terrorism” here is extremely indefinite and no-one really knows what it includes. Nelson Mandela, for example, was removed from this terrorist list only in 2008) or if you happen to be suspected of belligerence against the government (again, without actually defining this term) you can get arrested, detained and deported, without anyone knowing where you are, with no right to a lawyer nor a court (that means no expressed or proven suspects). You simply disappear until the conflict is over, and if the conflict is against terrorism, I doubt there’ll ever be a ceasing date for the “war”. And all of this stands both for American and foreign citizens. This law, along with the construction of new detention fields in the United States and renewing of others, added to the aggressive attitude of the NYPD, added to the government policy, which keeps making laws to actually forbid protests, added to being stalked day in and day out, has literally paralyzed me for three days, during which I even stopped taping and showing up in Zuccotti Plaza. And, if I overcame fear, if I hadn’t run back to Italy, if I otherwise have extended my stay for 40 days more, is only thanks to the occupiers and their contagious strength and energy. In fact, two have been the things that most shocked me during these 90 days of occupation: the repression by the police and the occupiers’ reaction. And this last one was the real miracle. I’ve never seen the movement getting weaker, or passively accepting, but instead I’ve seen it growing more and more both for determination and numerically. And it has given me a great pragmatic example of how to peacefully react to repression. How? Unmasking its stupidity, making it public, ridiculing its actions, singing the “evil” song from Star Wars when hundreds of policemen arrange in line every night to close Union Square park with barricades, talking to the policemen in line, asking them if this is the world they want to build, the world they wish to give to their children: a world where you get arrested for singing, a world where the human being is less important than money, a world where peaceful protesters get hit and arrested, a society that is destroying our Planet, contaminating food, starting wars for economical reasons, a world that doesn’t assist you when you’re sick, that lives over the people’s skins. For days, months, nonstop I’ve seen peaceful protesters being assaulted and arrested on a daily basis, still not giving up. They kept looking for a dialogue, some sort of communication between human beings. And I’ve seen confused policemen, with their eyes wide open, looking around them, listening, asking themselves questions. Among others gazing into space and chewing gum, there are some starting to have some doubts. I’ve seen a retired NYPD Captain (Captain Ray Lewis) who’s been arrested for civil disobedience, who’s going to the protests and on the streets wearing a pin with “Occupy” written on it. I’ve seen him in every march against police repression, speaking from the stage, being interviewed, thanking who thanked him to be there (“I’m the one thanking you! Without you, none of this could be possible”). Occupiers don’t give up. Because they believe in what they’re doing, because they’re not bribable, because they’re deeply convinced there’s no alternative other than changing this system we’re living into. Depending from the day and the event, there can be 30 or 2000 people, of different age, culture, ethnicity, religion. Every action and peaceful expression is welcome. I’ve seen a police charge being averted by meditation, flowers against batons, songs against barricades. And to this moment, there’s always been one winner. The occupiers. And even such a blind repression, increasing day-by-day, does nothing but showing the terror of power towards this colorful group of pacifists. The terror of contagion, that this strength and energy surrounding them wherever they are may one day spread around. From here, looking at last days’ repressions on the Internet, my very first instinct was to pay them back with their own coin. A thought that had never come to my mind while I was in New York. Because when you’re with the Wall Street’s occupiers, their contagious energy minimizes the situation, gives vent to rage and frustration with dances, hugs, songs (One! We are the people! – Two! We are united! – Three! The occupation IS NOT LEAVING!) and the voices increase the more the taunts increase, and solidarity increases the more the repression increases, and their strength is empowered by the fear the system is showing towards their existence. I’ve come back to Italy because my visa had expired. But I wish to go back to edit my documentary there. The American visa-system keeps me from going back immediately, and I’m trying to apply for a press-visa, this time. Will I manage? Or will my entrance in the USA be forbidden, as an unwanted guest, simply for having exercising my right to inform? It doesn’t mind. This time again the occupiers have won: come what may, my heart has now been “occupied”. (Chiara Cavallazzi)

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