1. Keeping up with Heart Failure

    01:45

    from Lee Memorial Health System Added 12 0 0

    While other aspects of heart disease are decreasing, heart failure is on the rise. Many experts are calling it an epidemic because it poses a massive a burden on the healthcare system. “Readmission for heart failure nationally run 25 to 30% within 30 days,” says Dr. Richard Chazal, who is a cardiologist with Lee Memorial Health System. Locally, figures are much lower. Lee Memorial Health System is addressing the issue by addressing the cause. The term heart failure doesn’t mean the heart has stopped working, but that it is not pumping well enough to meet the body’s needs. “The term failure in this case, means the failure of the heart to accommodate the normal blood volume and thus fluid volume in the body,” says Dr. Chazal. A progressive condition, people with severe heart failure require constant monitoring. If too much fluid builds up, it generally leads to hospitalization. Taking steps to self-manage and getting patients into cardiac rehab can make a difference. “There are numerous studies that show how effective cardiac rehab is in heart failure. We do a lot of work with patients regarding their diet and the risk factors for heart disease - smoking cessation, weight loss. They’re exercising three days a week,” says Marion Harris-Barter, who is a registered nurse with Lee Memorial Health System. It is proving to be a winning strategy. “We actually have things called core-measures that are proven to reduce the likelihood of recurrent congestive heart failure and we bring all our resources to bear on patients to try and make sure they’re on the right medication, but they also have the right support system,” says Dr. Chazal. The goal is to keep hearts going, while closing the revolving door to hospitalization. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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    • Tobacco smoking in adolescence as a risk factor in developing cardiovascular diseases later in life, by Amanda Amos

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      from Fondation Singer-Polignac Added 1 0 0

      Le 13 mai 2015, la Fondation Singer-Polignac co-organisait un colloque intitulé "Adolescent health : investing in the future". Pour en savoir plus : http://www.singer-polignac.org/fr/missions/sciences/colloques/1239-european-symposium-on-adolescent-health

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      • Presentation 4: Stress Management

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        from Heart and Stroke Foundation Added 10 0 0

        Uncontrollable stress is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This presentation explains what stress is and presents helpful tips and tools for women to help them cope with the stress in their lives.

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        • Finding Female Cancers

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          from Lee Memorial Health System Added 13 0 0

          A challenging aspect of ovarian cancer is that it has few outward symptoms. Making it difficult to diagnose until the cancer has spread. “There is no vaccine for ovarian cancer. There’s no proven screening test. It does get diagnosed at unfortunately an advanced stage,” explains. He is oncologist Dr. Samith Sandadi on medical staff of Lee Memorial Health System. Only about 20% of women are diagnosed early, when the disease may be most curable, which is why doctors are trying to find female cancers sooner, through genetic testing. “It’s only if you have certain risk factors that we would offer it. And it’s very important to know what those risk factors are because it gives you a better overall picture of your risk.” Family history is the biggest red flag. Three or more relatives with the same or related cancers, two relatives diagnosed with any cancer at a young age, or one relative with two or more cancers. Using these as a starting point may better the odds. “By employing these screening tests early and by counseling them on risk-reducing strategies, we can hopefully decrease the incidence of ovarian cancer,” says Dr. Sandadi. Genetic screening is a risky diagnosis. The BRCA gene and Lynch Syndrome greatly increase cancer risk, including breast, ovarian, uterine, and colorectal. Identifying an inherited mutation helps tailor treatment for people diagnosed with cancer, but may also prevent it in people who are not. “For example, if you have the BRCA gene and you’re at risk for ovarian cancer, we generally would have you do a transvaginal ultrasound once a year. We have a blood test called a CA125 we would check once a year.” Lynch Syndrome also triggers early colonoscopy. Many women will opt for preventative surgeries including hysterectomy and mastectomy, making it less likely they will ever face a female cancer. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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          • Understanding Uveal Melanoma

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            from Patient Power Added 86 0 0

            When we think about melanoma, we most often associate it with skin cancer that can be seen on the surface of the body. However, in uveal melanoma it remains behind the eye and not visible. Dr. Sapna Patel, an assistant professor of melanoma at MD Anderson Cancer Center, describes uveal melanoma, who is at risk for this aggressive cancer, and how this rare type of melanoma can be prevented.

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            • What is SPF? Tips on Preventing Skin Cancer

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              from Patient Power Added 49 0 0

              One of the deadliest skin cancers is melanoma, and sadly it’s on the rise. It’s important to protect ourselves year-round from harmful sunrays. Dr. Sapna Patel, an assistant professor of melanoma at MD Anderson Cancer Center, shares tips for protecting yourself and your loved ones against melanoma. She explains what you should look for when buying sunscreen and provides a basic overview of SPF.

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              • Cover Test

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                from Robert W Arnold Added 120 1 0

                By covering the fixing eye and observing the re-fixing behavior of the other eye, you will be able to detect, and quantitate STRABISMUS in children. Strabismus is a severe risk factor for AMBLYOPIA- potentially permanent, but treatable vision impairment in young children. www.ABCD-Vision.org

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                • Treating Health Management Like Wealth Management

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                  from Lee Memorial Health System Added 34 0 0

                  In times of sickness, we realize there is nothing more valuable than good health- but doctors find people do a better job investing in their wealth, than they do in their wellness. “Most people have people have hired accountants and other people to help them with their finances, make sure they’re developing that nest egg so when they retire they have a lot of wealth. How many people have hired a health manager?” says Dr. Sal Lacagnina, VP health & wellness with Lee Memorial Health System. Hiring a health manager can be as simple as establishing with a family doctor. Someone who monitors your health, tracks medical conditions and is a gatekeeper to specialists. Most common health issues that plague the general population rarely develop overnight. “There may be underlying problems developing and you can catch them early. Or you may have significant risk factors, that if worked on with lifestyle changes can be decreased and lower your risk for chronic illnesses,” says Dr. Lacagnina. One of the best things you can do for yourself is schedule a yearly physical. “We spend the better part of an hour together and we talk about all things that pertain to my health. My physical well being any problems that I might have, any that I might anticipate,” says Jeff Steffel, gets annual physicals. “I have a blood test before I have my physical and they tell me if I have a problem with my cholesterol,” says John Humphrey. Even adults with healthy routines, shouldn’t skip the checkup. “We see a lot of people who develop a certain body style or body habits, but they may be developing significant problems especially related to cardiovascular disease,” says Dr. Lacagnina. But it’s obesity that may have earned the top spot in health management. “Being overweight or obese is one of the significant risk factors for all of the chronic illnesses: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, muscular skeletal problems, depression,” says Dr. Lacagnina. Putting in time now, could payoff with more years to enjoy your health dividends. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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                  • The Who’s and What’s of Aortic Stenosis

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                    from Lee Memorial Health System Added 137 0 0

                    “The patient will become weakened, develop a shortness of breath develop, chest pain,” says Dr. Steven Priest, cardiologist with Lee Memorial Health System’s medical staff. These classic symptoms fit a number of health conditions. So it’s not uncommon for aortic stenosis to get picked up late in elderly patients. “More often than not, it’s just deterioration of the valve from the aging process where calcium will build up on the valve, the valve becomes stiff and then blood has difficulty passing through,” says Dr. Priest. Aortic stenosis may be undiagnosed in hundreds of thousands of people across the U.S. they have symptoms, but don’t recognize the urgency. “If you have severe aortic stenosis, the mortality in the first two year is about 50%. If it’s not treated,” says Dr. Priest. There is no medical therapy to cure aortic stenosis, or slow its progress. The only treatment is an operation to replace the valve. By the time many elderly people learn they have it, they could be in poor health, facing surgery. “The standard operation was to open somebody’s chest, put them on the heart lung machine, stop their heart, open the aorta, cut out the valve, sew a new valve in,” says Dr. Brian Hummel, cardiothoracic surgeon on Lee Memorial Health System’s medical staff. Greater awareness may lead to earlier detection: 75% of patients are male. Calcium buildup is the most common cause. It is also linked to: a congenital heart defect and rheumatic fever. Risk factors are age, hypertension, smoking, elevated lipoprotein and high LDL cholesterol. Surgeons are now able to operate on people once considered too weak for open- heart surgery. “Utilizing the same sorts of valve materials that are available through standard operation, but now delivering it by a catheter into the position and blowing it up by a balloon,” says Dr. Hummel. Called TAVR- a new valve is delivered by a catheter threaded through arteries in the groin or directly through the chest wall - expanding treatment for one of the most heart-wrenching conditions. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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                    • Amblyopia resembles Drowning

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                      from Robert W Arnold Added 61 1 0

                      Vision loss due to childhood amblyopia resembles acquisition of swimming skills and drowning in terms of age-dependence, impact and treatment. Early detection of amblyopia risk factors (poor focus resembles lack of buoyancy) allows the option to provide protection (spectacles resemble life preservers) and may avoid the need for rescue treatment (patching the better eye resembles CPR).

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