1. Early Spring and The Adonis

    01:09

    from Tsunesaburo Kobayashi / Added

    6 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Adonis, the flower of message for coming spring

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    • 総立ち2014

      01:17

      from Tsunesaburo Kobayashi / Added

      3 Plays / / 0 Comments

      In winter, tens thousands of wild geese stays at lake Izunuma in Kurihara city, Miyagi pref. northern Japan. When the sun rises, many of wild geese fly up from the lake simultaneously.

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      • Sounds of the Workshop: Lacquering an Aikuchi Tanto Mount

        04:29

        from Crossed Heart Forge / Added

        Sounds of the Urushi Table, that is, a.k.a.: the *even* quieter edition. The final stages of finishing the aikuchi tanto. This is a collection of clips documenting the steps and sounds involved at most every stage of the process of hand lacquering a traditional aikuchi tanto mount made from reclaimed driftwood. Several of the layers have been omitted from the video when they were exact repeats of the previous ones. The process spanned a month and a half including curing and drying time in between each step. Each layer is allowed to cure in a warm, humid box for two to three days and then polished with charcoal and water before the next is applied. Urushi is traditional Japanese lacquer made from the sap of a specific tree. The natural colour is a milky brown that oxidizes to deep chocolate and the black colour is created through a reaction with red iron oxide. The lighting was not optimal for several of the steps here, but at least the general process is demonstrated. Read more about the process of making this work on the photo essay page: islandblacksmith.ca/process/making-aikuchi-tanto-kuro-urushi-koshirae/

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        • Sounds of the Workshop: Creating an Aikuchi Tanto Mount

          04:30

          from Crossed Heart Forge / Added

          Sounds of the woodshop, that is, a.k.a.: the quiet edition. Sit back and chill to the sounds of sharp blades and smooth wood. This is a collection of clips documenting the steps and sounds involved at most every stage of the process of hand making a traditional aikuchi tanto mount from reclaimed driftwood. The project began as a large piece of Nootka Cypress driftwood and is worked entirely by hand through each step, employing tools and techniques as they would have been used centuries ago when this style of knife was developed in Japan. The blade is made from century-old shear steel from a horse drawn carriage spring and based on design elements of the 13th century Aizu Shintogo tanto: islandblacksmith.ca/2014/04/aizu-shintogo-kunimitsu-tanto-kata/. Read more about the process of making this work on the photo essay page: islandblacksmith.ca/process/making-aikuchi-tanto-kuro-urushi-koshirae/ The next step will be to finish the surface with natural urushi lacquer.

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          • Tsukimi Tanto - Final Assembly

            02:03

            from Crossed Heart Forge / Added

            A quick clip of the final assembly of the Tsukimi Tanto. All parts of traditionally constructed tanto and koshirae fit together tightly and the assembly is locked together with a single bamboo peg. Each part fits only one way, even the bamboo peg has a specific alignment for maximum strength. View the finished work: http://islandblacksmith.ca/2014/09/tsukimi-tanto/ See the process of making this piece: http://islandblacksmith.ca/process/making-the-tsukimi-tanto/ The bright orange moon of late Summer and early Autumn is the inspiration for this work. Tsukimi means moon watching, and brings to mind the lovely harvest moon and the rustling sounds of the dry, frost coloured susuki grass as the evening breeze blows across the plateau. The unusual ring and plate style kurikata is hammer textured, patinated, and set into the dark sky of the lacquered saya, among the innumerable stars of the Milky Way. Materials for the koshirae include copper bus bar and water pipe for the fuchi, kashira, habaki, and kurikata, silver and nickel-silver spoons for the hammer-textured seppa, and a steel spike salvaged from thirty feet under the Pacific for the heat-blued tsuba. The blade was hand forged in a charcoal fire from a large Caterpillar tractor pushrod, shaped with files, differentially hardened using traditional water quench yaki-ire, and polished by hand with water stones.

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            • Sounds of the Workshop: Creating a Tanto Blade

              02:33

              from Crossed Heart Forge / Added

              Just for fun! This is a collection of clips documenting the sounds involved at each stage of the process of making a traditional tanto blade from reclaimed steel. A little slower the second time in case you missed anything in the intro! The blade is based on design elements of the 13th century Aizu Shintogo tanto: http://islandblacksmith.ca/2014/04/aizu-shintogo-kunimitsu-tanto-kata/

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              • Morning Dew

                01:45

                from Tsunesaburo Kobayashi / Added

                21 Plays / / 0 Comments

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                • Yaki-Ire - How a Tanto Blade is Born

                  04:34

                  from Crossed Heart Forge / Added

                  Process of Clay Tempering a Tanto Blade (crew: me and a camera on a tripod) Once the steel is shaped as much as possible in its softer state, it is coated with a thin layer of clay along the edge and a thicker layer on the body and spine. During the hardening process, the split second difference in cooling time caused by the clay layer creates two different hardness areas in the same piece of steel. The edge cools faster and forms a very hard steel structure called martensite while the body cools slower and forms a very tough steel structure made of ferrite and pearlite. The boundary between these two areas is called hamon and is commonly seen as a frosted wavy line down the length of a polished sword blade. When the clay is fully dry, a charcoal fire is used to heat the steel slowly and evenly, taking care not to overheat any part of it. First the spine is heated to bring the whole blade to just below temperature, and then it is flipped over to focus heat on the edge. When the entire edge is at the correct temperature, it is plunged into a hot water bath, edge down, and held until cool (yaki-ire). The hardness is checked with a file and the process repeated if necessary. After hardening, the clay is removed and the steel is heated slightly again to remove some of the internal stresses (yaki-modoshi). Once this process is finished, and if the steel survives, the blade is ready for Togi, hand polishing. more: http://islandblacksmith.ca/process/yaki-ire-clay-tempering/

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                  • Forging a Tanto from a Shear Steel Carriage Leaf Spring

                    03:53

                    from Crossed Heart Forge / Added

                    Charcoal forging a traditional tanto pattern blade from half of a reclaimed shear steel horse carriage leaf spring. The two distinct stages are sunobe and hizukuri...sunobe establishes the geometry and proportions, and hizukuri is putting in the bevels and creating the final shape. Shear steel is a very old and somewhat rare form of steel produced by increasing the carbon content of wrought iron using heat and charcoal to create a reduction atmosphere and then forge welding and folding layers together to homogenize the billet. Finished blade has distinct visible layers telling the story of its history. **This is the overview edit, for the full length version from start to finish, see: http://youtu.be/y7fROs7i8-U The blade shape is based on the Aizu Shintogo kata, however there was not enough steel to produce the full thickness on the mune (motokasane) of the original blade. Info on the Aizu Shintogo tanto: http://islandblacksmith.ca/2014/04/aizu-shintogo-kunimitsu-tanto-kata/

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                    • Testing Blacksmithing Charcoal

                      00:49

                      from Crossed Heart Forge / Added

                      A couple of clips showing a comparison of proper softwood blacksmithing / bladesmithing charcoal with "overcooked" high temperature charcoal best suited for biochar applications. Bladesmithing charcoal tests: 1. hard and clean, not crumbly and dusty 2. dense and solid, not spongy and blown out 3. musical and ringing when tapped, not dead and dull 4. burns with a blue and bright yellow flame, not a small dim orange flame more about making blacksmithing charcoal: http://islandblacksmith.ca/how-charcoal-is-made

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