1. University of Arizona Press | Who We Are

    03:15

    from University of Arizona Libraries Added 7 0 0

    The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. We disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. We advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

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    • Predatory Publishers: What they are and how to avoid them

      18:54

      from UBC Nursing Added 83 1 0

      This video aims to describe predatory publishers; why they are a problem; emerging scams; author service companies, peer review, and scholarly metrics, all in order to ensure that scholars are well-informed about emerging threats to their credibility and career progress. Presented by Dr. Sally Thorne, Professor - UBC School of Nursing and Associate Dean, Faculty Affairs - Faculty of Applied Science.

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      • Scholarly Slides

        04:27

        from Dan Lorch Added 524 2 1

        This short film is about Clifford Kapono. He was my neighbor in La Jolla for two years and has become a close friend. He is an exceptional surfer and a creative filmmaker, but Cliff would say that family and academics top his priority list. He came from humble beginnings in Hawaii and made his way into the rigorous academic arena of UCSD’s Chemical Biology PHD program. His research focuses on understanding the health and longevity of reef structures on a molecular level throughout the Central Pacific.

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        • Evaluate Online Sources

          07:03

          from WJ Bryan Added 24 0 0

          Thanks for watching this tutorial from Bryan College Academic Support. Today we’re going to talk about different types of sources you can find online and how to evaluate them. Many students like to use online sources because they are usually easy to use and can be accessed any time from any place, as long as you have an Internet connection. Websites also have some advantages over print materials – they can be updated quicker and more often, and they allow readers to get involved by commenting and “liking” different items. There is little to no control over what can be published online, and although this has some risks for the quality of the material, it also means you will be able to find a variety of perspectives on any topic. Many online sources are popular sources. This means they are written for a general audience in easy-to-understand language. Popular sources are not reviewed for quality, so they may contain advertisements or be biased. You can access popular sources through popular search engines like Google, Yahoo!, and Bing. The most common online source is a website. Websites consist of multiple webpages on a certain topic. Most webpages integrate text, images, links, and videos in a way that appeals to users. You can tell a little about the purpose of a website from its URL address. Commercial and organizational websites – ending in .com and .org – may be more biased because they reflect the interests of a company or organization. Generally, educational and government websites – .edu and .gov – are more reliable. Blogs are a particular type of website written by an individual or group of individuals on a certain topic. Topics range as far as the imagination, from tools to books to cooking to family photos. All blogs are similar in that content appears in “posts” arranged by date, with the most recent first. Blogs also encourage readers to comment on posts and share their thoughts. You can also access scholarly sources using the Internet. These sources are written by experts in an academic field. Since the intended audience consists of more experts, some of the language may be very specific “jargon” and more difficult to understand. The benefit of scholarly sources is that they have already been reviewed by experts, so you know they are of high quality. Usually you need to go through the library website to access these sources. Databases allow you to read articles from scholarly journals online. Each database can search for articles from many different journals. Databases can be specific for an academic field or for general knowledge. They have lots of special features to help you search for articles, but this means they are more complicated and a little harder to use than search engines. eBooks are online copies of library books that you can read on a computer. You can “check them out” and read them online through the library website. Remember, some books may not let you copy and paste information, and other books can only be viewed by one student at a time. So why is it important to evaluate online sources? If you go through the library website, you don’t have to worry about evaluating them because they have already been reviewed and proven to be of high quality But NONE of the sources you find on the open web through search engines has been reviewed in this way This means YOU have the responsibility of making sure your sources are actually credible and trustworthy To evaluate the quality of the source, just perform the easy-to-remember CRAP test First, ask if the source is current, especially if it involves scientific research. Second, ask if the source provides references and is balanced. Third, investigate who wrote the source. Is the author credible, trustworthy, and objective? And finally, what is the author’s purpose? Can you rely on the source to inform you, or is it meant to persuade you of something or sell you something? Let’s try putting the CRAP test into action. This is the home page of the National Center for Education Statistics website. We can see through news updates that the website is current through the end of last year. The URL is a .gov, meaning it is a government source. We can also read the “About Us” page and find out the members, purpose, and standards for the NCES. Overall, we can conclude that this is a reliable source and you could cite it in a paper. Thanks again for watching this tutorial, and check out the Academic Support website at http://www.bryan.edu/asc/ags-de for more information and tutoring help.

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          • AAUP 2014 - Town Hall: The Revolution Will Be Subsidized (5/5)

            43:21

            from AAUP Added 7 0 0

            The market model for publishing scholarly monographs has seldom been robust, but, increasingly, the entire ecosystem around this foundational form is threatened. Two bold ideas have emerged that seek to address these threats by offering new business models intended to restore economic viability to long-form scholarly publishing. In this town-hall style meeting, join representatives of two organizations as they describe their efforts to shift the model for evaluating and disseminating humanities monographs. The press you save may be your own. Chair: Greg Britton, Editorial Director, Johns Hopkins University Press Panelists: Peter Berkery, Executive Director, AAUP; Raym Crow, AAU/ARL Task Force on Scholarly Communications; Donald J. Waters, Program Officer for Scholarly Communications, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation http://www.aaupnet.org/events-a-conferences/annual-meeting/aaup-2014/program

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            • AAUP 2014 - Town Hall: The Revolution Will Be Subsidized (4/5)

              09:39

              from AAUP Added 7 0 0

              The market model for publishing scholarly monographs has seldom been robust, but, increasingly, the entire ecosystem around this foundational form is threatened. Two bold ideas have emerged that seek to address these threats by offering new business models intended to restore economic viability to long-form scholarly publishing. In this town-hall style meeting, join representatives of two organizations as they describe their efforts to shift the model for evaluating and disseminating humanities monographs. The press you save may be your own. Chair: Greg Britton, Editorial Director, Johns Hopkins University Press Panelists: Peter Berkery, Executive Director, AAUP; Raym Crow, AAU/ARL Task Force on Scholarly Communications; Donald J. Waters, Program Officer for Scholarly Communications, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation http://www.aaupnet.org/events-a-conferences/annual-meeting/aaup-2014/program

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              • AAUP 2014 - Town Hall: The Revolution Will Be Subsidized (3/5)

                15:49

                from AAUP Added 18 0 0

                The market model for publishing scholarly monographs has seldom been robust, but, increasingly, the entire ecosystem around this foundational form is threatened. Two bold ideas have emerged that seek to address these threats by offering new business models intended to restore economic viability to long-form scholarly publishing. In this town-hall style meeting, join representatives of two organizations as they describe their efforts to shift the model for evaluating and disseminating humanities monographs. The press you save may be your own. Chair: Greg Britton, Editorial Director, Johns Hopkins University Press Panelists: Peter Berkery, Executive Director, AAUP; Raym Crow, AAU/ARL Task Force on Scholarly Communications; Donald J. Waters, Program Officer for Scholarly Communications, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation http://www.aaupnet.org/events-a-conferences/annual-meeting/aaup-2014/program

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                • AAUP 2014 - Town Hall: The Revolution Will Be Subsidized (2/5)

                  07:31

                  from AAUP Added 11 0 0

                  The market model for publishing scholarly monographs has seldom been robust, but, increasingly, the entire ecosystem around this foundational form is threatened. Two bold ideas have emerged that seek to address these threats by offering new business models intended to restore economic viability to long-form scholarly publishing. In this town-hall style meeting, join representatives of two organizations as they describe their efforts to shift the model for evaluating and disseminating humanities monographs. The press you save may be your own. Chair: Greg Britton, Editorial Director, Johns Hopkins University Press Panelists: Peter Berkery, Executive Director, AAUP; Raym Crow, AAU/ARL Task Force on Scholarly Communications; Donald J. Waters, Program Officer for Scholarly Communications, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation http://www.aaupnet.org/events-a-conferences/annual-meeting/aaup-2014/program

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                  • AAUP 2014 - Town Hall: The Revolution Will Be Subsidized (1/5)

                    03:43

                    from AAUP Added 9 0 0

                    The market model for publishing scholarly monographs has seldom been robust, but, increasingly, the entire ecosystem around this foundational form is threatened. Two bold ideas have emerged that seek to address these threats by offering new business models intended to restore economic viability to long-form scholarly publishing. In this town-hall style meeting, join representatives of two organizations as they describe their efforts to shift the model for evaluating and disseminating humanities monographs. The press you save may be your own. Chair: Greg Britton, Editorial Director, Johns Hopkins University Press Panelists: Peter Berkery, Executive Director, AAUP; Raym Crow, AAU/ARL Task Force on Scholarly Communications; Donald J. Waters, Program Officer for Scholarly Communications, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation http://www.aaupnet.org/events-a-conferences/annual-meeting/aaup-2014/program

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                    • Archetypical article structure

                      04:05

                      from Sune Müller Added 17 0 0

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