1. Once again...Sevengill Sharks

    02:39

    from Terry Strait / Added

    76 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Yesterday was so awesome that I went back out again today...worse visibility but LOTS of sharks today.

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    • Seven Gill Sharks and Sheep Crabs

      02:27

      from Walter Chung / Added

      On tonight's dive at La Jolla Cove, we encountered some large seven gill sharks. We also learned that sheep crabs like to climb. And, if you ever wondered how sheep crabs mate, then watch the video.

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      • Pisces Divers Cow Shark Dive

        01:09

        from Moz Images / Added

        56 Plays / / 0 Comments

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        • Sevengill sighting 2009-03-21 - Video Dive Log

          01:14

          from Barbara Lloyd (HDV Diva) / Added

          1,256 Plays / / 2 Comments

          Date of Encounter: 3-21-09 Dive Location: Point Loma Kelp Beds Dive Site: Broomtail Reef Viz: Below the light green gloom about 20 Mix: Nitrox ~32% Dive 1: 66 min Dive 2: ~ 40 min Video Camera Used: Sony V1U, Gates Housing, with superwide angle port Scott McGee’s Still Camera: - Nikon D200 in an Ikelite housing - Single Ikelite DS125 strobe - 105mm lens for maco - 10.5 fisheye lens for WA macro first dive, wide angle second (thank god!) Broomtail Reef is max 50. Both dives were at the same general site. Rocky reef with macrosystis (giant kelp) and two types of sea palm. Some outcroppings soars 20+ feet and have overhangs and are as large as a house. First dive we dropped and took a north heading from the anchor for about 30 yards to a rocky outcropping. I filmed nudibranch behavior, a green anemone eating kelp, and then a yellowtail fringehead about 3 inches in size. He was very cooperative and energetic, feeding and very photogenic. Second dive we headed south to shoot wide angle. I couldn’t find any outcroppings this time. There are some channels where the water just rips through so it was very flat with lots of macrosystis. So we meandered around looking for things. I filmed some senoritas as I needed that, but it was more kelp bass and small sheephead. Scott found things to shoot, including taking stills of me setting up Lakshmi. He shot some California Golden Gorgonians. Then I turned us back towards the boat. I finally found a navanax and was filming for minutes from all angles. I had my head in the sand and something told me I better I look up! I see this shark pass about 5 feet from me. I couldn’t make the camera shift fast enough. I missed the shot. I looked over at Scott and asked him if he got it and he said he got it. Great! Let’s head back to the boat. I was surprisingly calm. This was a big creature. It must have been at least 4.5 feet long. I took a heading. About 5 minutes later I sensed the shot! My camera was up and filming. Actually, when I looked at the footage I hit the record as I swung it up and around. Good, my instincts were in intact!. It was coming head on to me. I must not have not realized the camera was on and hit the button again. Dammit! Just in time I got the record going again. Perfect framing, perfect lighting. She was beautiful. She was graceful. She was so huge in my frame. She was only an arms length from my camera lens! That means she was less than 5 feet from me. I had this 110 degree angle lens at full wide angle and she completely filled the frame from one end to the other. I know she must be at least five feet of not closer to six. Her coloring is so beautiful and she is so graceful. She was not aggressive, today, thank heavens. Nonetheless, my heart was hammering like crazy after the second encounter. Nice to know that my primordial instincts do works after all! This was about 5 minutes from the first encounter. I signaled to Scott, keep and eye out and stick to the close buddy rule. What I wanted to say but didn’t know how to sign well enough was let’s keep back to back. So we hung around and sure enough 5 minutes later there she was again. But I was using my camera, which has about twice the visual range as me, to look behind me from time to time. It was obvious we were being circled. Well sure enough we had a third encounter. I believe she came in on Scott’s side this time and lower. Well that was enough for Scott. I think the second dive was about 40 minutes. It was a good day for Marine Behavior!!! And I got 5 species on film!! If you don’t count the fish.

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          • Who patrols these waters?

            02:35

            from Barbara Lloyd (HDV Diva) / Added

            1,041 Plays / / 7 Comments

            Would you like to participate in Citizen Science? You can log your photos and video at http://oceansanctuaries.org/sevengillshark Part of the mission of Ocean Sanctuaries (oceansanctuaries.org) is to support ocean-related citizen science projects, such as the Sevengill Shark Sightings Org that Bear founded in 2010 to monitor and track Sevengill sharks (Notorynchus cepedianus) in the San Diego area. We are now identifying individual Sevengill sharks using a pair of pattern recognition algorithms to analyze the freckling patterns on the dorsal sides of these sharks. This involves using photographs taken by local divers who have been trained to recognize this species and obtain high definition photographs from various angles. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Broadnose or spotted sevengill shark - Notorynchus cepedianus (1807) The genus name Notorynchus is derived from the Greek "noton" meaning back and "rhyngchos" meaning snout. http://flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/Sevengill/Sevengill.html These beautiful creatures have recently begun returning to the waters off San Diego, in both the Point Loma and La Jolla kelp beds. They can be dangerous but much of the time they seem to want to know more about us. I believe our lights interest them. During the day the encounters can be more subdued since they can see us better. At night they must get very close before they dash off. The other creatures in this video are inhabitants of rocky reefs and kelp beds. For a full account of the dive refer to: http://www.vimeo.com/3813419

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            • Seven Gill Shark, La Jolla Cove

              01:36

              from Michael Sanderson / Added

              713 Plays / / 9 Comments

              Gary H., Simon G., and I went diving to see if we could run across the Seven Gill that Gary had seen the previous day. While I have the encounter at the end of this short video, it actually happened at the beginning of the dive. I guess I just felt like saving the best for last. ;-)

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              • Lady Genevieve & the subjects in Her Realm (an encounter with a sevengill shark)

                03:10

                from Barbara Lloyd (HDV Diva) / Added

                1,182 Plays / / 3 Comments

                Broadnose or spotted sevengill shark - Notorynchus cepedianus (1807) The genus name Notorynchus is derived from the Greek "noton" meaning back and "rhyngchos" meaning snout. http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/Sevengill/Sevengill.html Dive Location: Point Loma Kelp Beds Dive Site: Broomtail Vid Viz: Below the light green gloom about 20 Mix: Nitrox ~32% Broomtail Reef is max 50. Both dives were at the same general site. Rocky reef with macrocystis pyrifera (giant kelp) and two types of sea palm algae. Some outcroppings soars 20+ feet and have overhangs and are as large as a house. ** Upon review of the still photos this shark had patrolled us at least one pass before this "first" encounter. How many more times? I had my head in the sand and something told me I better I look up! I see this shark pass about 5 feet from me. I couldn't make the camera shift fast enough. I missed the shot. I looked over at Scott and asked him if he got it and he said he got it. Great! Let's head back to the boat. I was surprisingly calm. This was a big creature. It must have been at least 4.5 feet long. I took a heading. About 5 minutes later I sensed the shot! My camera was up and filming. Actually, when I looked at the footage I hit the record as I swung it up and around. Good, my instincts were in intact!. It was coming head on to me. I must not have not realized the camera was on and hit the button again. Dammit! Just in time I got the record going again. Perfect framing, perfect lighting. She was beautiful. She was graceful. She was so huge in my frame. She was only an arms length from my camera lens! That means she was less than 5 feet from me. I had this 110 degree angle lens at full wide angle and she completely filled the frame from one end to the other. I know she must be at least five feet if not closer to six in length. Her coloring is so beautiful and she is so graceful. She was not aggressive, today, thank heavens. Nonetheless, my heart was hammering like crazy after the second encounter. Nice to know that my primordial instincts do works after all! This was about 5 minutes from the first encounter. I signaled to Scott, keep and eye out and stick to the close buddy rule. What I wanted to say, but didn't know how to sign well enough, was let's keep back to back. So we hung around. I was using my camera, which has about twice the visual range as me, to look behind me from time to time. It was obvious we were being circled, and sure enough 5 minutes later there she was again for a third encounter. I believe she came in on Scott's side this time and lower. Well that was enough for Scott. I think the second dive was about 40 minutes. It was a good day for marine behavior!!! I got 5 species on film!! If you don't count the fish and Lady Genevieve.

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