1. Polarisation

    12:35

    from Sha Tin College Science / Added

    128 Plays / / 0 Comments

    In the video Mr Drew outline two key laws used when studying polarisation; Brewster's Law and Malus' Law. He explains how each law is used and gives a few worked examples of each. In addition Mr Drew points out some of the possible pitfalls which you will need to avoid when attempting exam questions. This video will support your learning in IB Physics topic 11; Wave Phenomena (SWP)

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    • Parabolic motion - a harder example

      09:02

      from Sha Tin College Science / Added

      279 Plays / / 0 Comments

      On the evening of Wednesday, November 14th, 2012, Zlatan Ibrahimovic capped a wonderful performance for Sweden against England by scoring one of the finest goals in the history of the beautiful game. This fine effort provided inspiration for a parabolic motion worked example. The previous video on parabolic motion outlines how to solve a problem when the object is projected parallel to the horizontal; in this example the ball is kicked at an angle to the horizontal. Although, as always, you can still solve the problem by treating horizontal and vertical motion independently, this time you must resolve the initial velocity vector into y and x components. Watch this video to work out the distance traveled by the ball, the time taken and the height reached. This video will support your learning in IB Phyics topic 9; motion in fields (KIN HL)

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      • Binary Code

        10:36

        from Sha Tin College Science / Added

        202 Plays / / 0 Comments

        In this video Keanu Reeves discusses why digital signals have several advantages over analogue signals. The importance of binary code is highlighted and the conversion from decimal numbers is explained. This video will support your learning in IB Physics topic 14; Digital Technology (DIG)

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        • Vectors and scalars

          14:03

          from Sha Tin College Science / Added

          144 Plays / / 1 Comment

          In this Video Mr Hodgson outlines the key differences between Vector and Scalar quantities. Addition and resolution of vectors are covered so that you should be able to complete a range of past IB, relevant questions. Although vectors are introduced in topic 1; Physics and Physical measurement (ITU) they are used throughout the course notably in topic 2; Mechanics (KIN and DYN), topic 6 ; Fields and Forces (FLD), topic 9; motion in fields (KIN and DYN) and topic 12; electromagnetic induction (MAG). Enjoy the video

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          • A Venus transit

            02:53

            from Sha Tin College Science / Added

            22 Plays / / 0 Comments

            This video tells the story of the Venus transit of the Sun, filmed at Sha Tin College in Hong Kong on June 6, 2012. The video outlines how historically, such transits enable Physicists to determine scale in the Universe including the size of the Solar System and distances from the Earth to the Sun and to Venus. Enjoy this beautiful astrophysical event. There are no assessment statements from IB Physics directly covered in this video but it will support your learning in the Astrophysics option (AST)

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            • Entropy - time's arrow

              10:44

              from Sha Tin College Science / Added

              44 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Entropy is a rather enigmatic physical quantity. Its definition, not required in the IB syllabus, is tantilisingly simple - the ratio of Thermal energy change per absolute temperature (Q/T) measured in J/K. In this video entropy is defined as a measure of disorder. In a thermodynamic system the billions of particle involved may be arranged in billions of different ways - perhaps in a range of energy levels. Only very few of these particle arrangements may be considered as ordered. For example, in ice the particles may be arranged in a neat, orderly way whereas in water the particles are randomly arranged. In addition there are far more disordered states possible than ordered states - hence the entropy of water is larger than ice. This video will support your learning in Topic 10; Thermal Physics (Thermodynamics - THD)

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              • Relativistic velocity

                09:57

                from Sha Tin College Science / Added

                43 Plays / / 0 Comments

                In this video Mr Drew compares the Galileo and Einstein formulas for relative velocity and then shows you how to solve a relativistic velocity problem. This video will support your learning in IB Physics optional topic H; relativity (REL)

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                • Experimental Errors

                  12:28

                  from Sha Tin College Science / Added

                  95 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  You will learn about random and systematic errors early on in many IB Physics courses. In this video Mr Hodgson shows you how to estimate uncertainties in measurements, then combine these together to determine the uncertainty in a calculated result. This topic is assessed in paper 1, question A1 in paper 2 and in all IAs. I hope you enjoy the musics which is very popular in East Asia at the moment (September 2012) - you may want to stop and get up and dance to improve your learning This video will support your unit in IB Physics Topic 1; Physics and physical measurement (ITU)

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                  • Log Graphs

                    10:30

                    from Sha Tin College Science / Added

                    99 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Welcome to all new IB Diploma students and particularly to those of you prepared to take on the challenge of IB Physics. In this video Mr Hodgson demonstrates a valuable technique to determine the mathematical relationship between two inter-dependent variables such as the period and length of a pendulum or the height fallen and time taken by an object accelerating as it falls due to gravity. The aim of any open ended, experimental Physics research or inquiry is to determine how the variables are related - this may also be the aim of an IA or your extended essay. One technique involves plotting a range of graphs, y against x, x^2, x^0.5 etc. until you find the one which gives a straight line of best fit. However this is an ad hoc method and can take some time. The use of a logarithm (log) graph is neat and elegant and gives you the relationship after plotting jut one graph. You do not need to understand what logarithms are (but it helps) just learn the process. Once you know this techniques you can determine any relationship between variables. This video will support your unit in IB Physics Topic 1; Physics and physical measurement (ITU)

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                    • Refractive index

                      09:26

                      from Sha Tin College Science / Added

                      63 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      This video is an STC Physics broadcasting first - a live recording in front of 12PH602, HL IB Physics class. In this video Mr Hodgson and the class develop the concept of refractive index and how it leads to Snell's Law. Finally this Law is applied to a situation when light passes from one medium to a second medium - neither of which are air (or a vacuum). This video will support your learning in IB Physics topic 4: Oscillations and waves (WAV).

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