1. Daydreaming It{aly}: Lost In The Alps

    05:00

    from Matty Brown / Added

    74.7K Plays / / 212 Comments

    This is Part Two to 'Dreaming It{aly}' vimeo.com/35270855 I'm a shy, awkward guy. I was dropped in the middle of the wintry Italian alps of Friuli Venezia Giulia, left to wander and experience whatever lay ahead. I met stranger after stranger who greeted me with a glass of wine and open arms; smiles as big as the mountains we conquered. They took me on a journey I will never forget. The interest they had in making sure I got out of my shell and had the experience of my life is so unheard of. In such a short period of time these strangers became family, untangling my shy soul and packed in the audacious and inspiring life I have always been journeying toward. What a happy and beautiful people. Directed, shot, and edited by MATTY BROWN Music by TORLEY http://music.torley.com/ Voicovers by ACCILVITY of freesound.org and ALLEXANDER THOMAS GREENE (http://www.freesound.org/people/fiatknox/) Produced by MIKAELA BANDINI http://www.cantforget.it/ Shot on the Canon 7D ( I don't know anything about lenses really. I just threw one on and ran around with it, hehe) Edited with Sony Vegas A big thank you for all the encouragement, advice, and critique: Goncalo De Almeida Costa, Steven Weinberg, Michael Clark, Keith Rivers. Special thank you to those who pushed me through this journey firsthand with eyes and mind wide open: Mikaela Bandini, Caspar Daniël Diederik, Cristina Menis, http://www.storytravelers.com/ Andanother big thanks to Torley, Acclivity, and Alexander Thomas Greene for your beautiful words and music. You guys are awesome!

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    • Fimbulvetr - A new direction in snowshoes

      02:00

      from Fimbulvetr / Added

      49.8K Plays / / 1 Comment

      Fimbulvetr is old-norse for: “The Great Winter”. The name signals our agelong heritage and experience with the white, harsh, cold season in Norway. As hardcore winter enthusiasts we set out to redesign snowshoes from scratch. This is how we did it. The film is made by a fantastic team from Ellioth & Winther Film (www.elliothwinther.no) and Siesta (www.siesta.no). Soundtrack by the brilliant Snasen (soundcloud.com/snasen). RC-aerials are shot by Tabb Firchau & Henning Sandström, Freefly Cinema. Check out www.fimbulvetr.no for more snowshoe love.

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      • Persistent Slab Avalanches

        06:55

        from Trent Meisenheimer / Added

        40.7K Plays / / 10 Comments

        Persistent slab avalanches are the dangerous, scary and tricky avalanches for backcountry riders. A quarter of all avalanche fatalities are caused by trauma, from hitting trees and rocks on the way down. These slabs are what we consider an unmanageable avalanche problem. The only tool we have is to avoid them, by using safe travel and terrain selection to our advantage. Get educated, take an avalanche class. Thanks for watching!

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        • The Smart Alec Backpack

          01:29

          from TOM BIHN / Added

          17.9K Plays / / 0 Comments

          The Smart Alec (http://www.tombihn.com/PROD/TB0103.html) is our modular backpack system: customize it to carry your gear with a variety of interior and exterior organizational pockets.

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          • Weston Ski Track Promotional Video

            03:46

            from Charles River Rec / Added

            11.3K Plays / / 0 Comments

            Weston Ski Track is a cross-country ski and snowshoeing center located on the Leo J. Martin Golf Course and serving the Greater Boston area. With natural snow, we groom 15km of trails. Snowmaking on our 2km lighted loop provides consistent snow conditions and reliable night skiing. Drop in for a beginner lesson and then warm up in our snack bar.

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            • Weak Layer, Slab, Trigger = Avalanche

              06:15

              from Trent Meisenheimer / Added

              8,921 Plays / / 7 Comments

              A few key things to pick up on when looking at layers within a snow-pack. Also a quick discussion on initiation and propagation. An overview of our current snow-pack structure.

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              • 2011-2012 Utah Backcountry Review

                19:57

                from Trent Meisenheimer / Added

                7,990 Plays / / 2 Comments

                The story of the 2011-2012 Utah backcountry season. The purpose of this review is to help us wrap our brains around the upcoming winter. A few things to remember about the start of a season. 1. Get your avalanche gear out. Check your beacon, shovel, probes. Make sure your beacon's batteries are fresh. 2. Bury your beacon in the leaves and practice a quick search using your searching techniques. 3. Remember shallow snow is weak snow. If there is enough snow to ride, there is enough to slide. 4. Its a long season, be patient. 5. Read an avalanche book (Bruce Tremper's Staying Alive In Avalanche Terrain) My favorite!!! 6. Early season consequences can be severe if caught in an avalanche. There are more exposed rocks and stumps to be dragged through. 7. Begin checking your local avalanche forecast. One of my favorite quotes is "The snowpack is always a question. Terrain is always the answer." Have a safe winter. -Trent Meisenheimer and Craig Gordan, Utah Avalanche Center

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                • Knowledge Is Powder

                  02:48

                  from Trent Meisenheimer / Added

                  6,705 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  KNOWLEDGE REALLY IS POWER - in the mountains and of course, we as backcountry riders want to stack the odds in our favor. It’s not a mystery that avalanche professionals like Bruce Tremper (Utah Avalanche Center) or Dr. Bruce Jamieson (Avalanche Researcher) can create life-long careers in backcountry avalanche terrain, and they’ve been doing this longer than some of us have been alive. Are they really just that LUCKY, or is it because throughout their careers they’ve made solid, well thought out, and most importantly, educated decisions in the mountains—or both? Yes, luck always plays a role. Nearly all the old-dog avalanche forecasters can tell a story about close call. But staying alive in the backcountry is far less a matter a chance than choice. Remember- over 90% of all avalanche accidents, the avalanche that catches, carries, and possibly kills us is triggered by the victim or someone in their group. This is actually a good statistic because it’s mostly our decisions that make the difference. And all the seemingly small risk reduction decisions we make every day, added up over a lifetime, have huge consequences. Of course avalanche professionals are human too and even with years of experience under their belts, occasionally they make the wrong decision. That’s why avy pros always carry avalanche safety gear and practice with it often. They continually try to avoid avalanches all together but if they make a mistake, then hopefully their partners with avalanche rescue gear can save them. (Beacon, Shovel, Probes) The best way to have a long career as a backcountry rider is to never be caught in the avalanche in the first place. Avoiding avalanches is the key. As the start of this winter season is now on our doorstep we need to not let our desire to shred pow, override or cloud our logical thinking… and we all know that’s easier said then done. Every backcountry rider I’ve ever known (me included) has been lured onto a slope because of how good it looked. Another example, (again me included) we might justify it by saying well, there are already multiple sets of tracks on the slope and it probably won’t avalanche on me. Remember that avalanches don't think this way. All they know is we come along, find a weak spot in the snowpack, collapse the weak layer (whoomph), and then propagate a fracture (crack) through the snowpack. You are going to have to think fast now, because it’s like staring down the barrel of the gun and you’ve got to get off the moving piece of snow… not the place any of us want to be. Sometimes it’s not the first person on the slope that triggers the slide, it might be the sixth or tenth or… you get the picture. Experience in the backcountry takes time; none of us became great skiers, boarders, sledders, or mountaineers overnight. It takes us years to become a good rider or climber. Well the same goes for being a savvy backcountry user. “Never underestimate the importance or the subtlety of terrain; it takes a lifetime to learn terrain, maybe two lifetimes.” (Chris Stethem) Experience Level – my definitions Beginner: Has gone to an avalanche awareness talk and read/listened to the day's avalanche advisory. Good with map and compass and able to stay on route. Intermediate: Has taken a Level 1 avalanche class and has roughly 3-5 years experience in avalanche terrain. Read/listened to the day's avalanche advisory. Able to recognize and avoid avalanche terrain. Advanced: Probably has taken a Level 2 avalanche class and has 5-10 years experience in avalanche terrain. Aware of the day's avalanche advisory to augment their own opinions of the avalanche danger for their intended objective or route. Expert: 10+ years most likely as a practitioner in the field. Able to expertly and efficiently move through complicated and dangerous terrain. Grasps subtleties of the snowpack, terrain, and weather to make own analysis. Confidence tempered by humility and respect of the dynamic elements in the mountains. Experience can come at a high price if we are wrong… Mistakes in the mountains can be harsh and unforgiving if we make the wrong decisions. Be patient in this learning process, it takes time to gain experience and to become a savvy backcountry rider. Realize these mountains are here to stay; there will always be a next year. Get some time under your belt, travel around, go look at an avalanche crown, take a look at different snowpack region (the Uinta Mountains are a great place to see a different snowpack) be patient and learn slowly. Remember we are out in the mountains with our best friends, family members, wife’s, husbands, colleagues, and believe it or not we all have parents. The grim reality of avalanche fatalities is for those left behind… The hardest part is we are the ones stuck with the void of someone we loved very much.

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                  • Uintas Avalanche Accident - January 18th 2013

                    02:37

                    from Trent Meisenheimer / Added

                    5,664 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    This is a preliminary accident report and we will have more details posted as we sort through them. One thing is very clear... this is truly a tragic avalanche accident- A family is out for a day of snowmobiling and they take a break for lunch in a wide open basin on the West Fork of the Duchesne. Four young family members walk to the edge of what appears to be a packed trail, however the edge is a cornice. They collapse the slope and two boys ages 7 and 14 are caught, carried, and subsequently buried at the bottom of the slope. While the father looks for the two boys, the mother jumps on her snowmobile and heads towards the trailhead to find help. She runs into State Parks grooming personnel who then activates 911. Wasatch and Summit County S&R along with two medical helicopters are dispatched. The small avalanche path is difficult to locate, but when the medical helicopters land, they discover the father performing CPR on both of his sons. The two boys are flown from the scene and pass away later in the evening at the hospital. This micro climate produced very weak snow near the ground. It appears the recent cold spell hyper-weakened the pre-existing pack before it was capped by a strong wind event on 1-15 and 1-16. Winds swirled around erratically in this little basin, forming two very distinct and increasingly strong hard slabs. Unfortunately, the interface between weak and strong layers allowed the young boys to get out onto the cornice before it failed catastrophically near the ground.

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                    • Utah Backcountry Review 2012 - 2013 Season

                      19:35

                      from Trent Meisenheimer / Added

                      4,971 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      The Utah Backcountry Review is premiered every year at the Utah Avalanche Centers annual Utah Snow & Avalanche Workshop hosted by Craig Gordon. This video kicks off the afternoon session with a bang and helps get our minds thinking about snow again by recapping last winter. Enjoy! A few things to remember about the start of a season. 1. Get your avalanche gear out. Check your beacon, shovel, probes. Make sure your beacon's batteries are fresh. 2. Bury your beacon in the leaves and practice a quick search using your searching techniques. 3. Remember shallow snow is weak snow. If there is enough snow to ride, there is enough to slide. 4. Its a long season, be patient. 5. Read an avalanche book (Bruce Tremper's Staying Alive In Avalanche Terrain) My favorite!!! 6. Early season consequences can be severe if caught in an avalanche, there are more exposed rocks and stumps to be dragged through. 7. Begin checking your local avalanche forecast. -One of my favorite quotes is "The snowpack is always a question. Terrain is always the answer." Have a safe winter. Trent Meisenheimer and Craig Gordan, Utah Avalanche Center

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