1. The 2014 Alex & Lena Casper Memorial Lecture: Dr. Steven Chu, March 13, 2014

    01:47:53

    from TV MIDDLETOWN Added

    Dr. Steven Chu, former Secretary of Energy and Nobel Prize-winning physicist, speaks on “The Innovation Imperative: How Leadership and Culture Foster Innovation,” at Miami University Middletown (Ohio). Recorded by TV Middletown on March 13, 2014 at Dave Finkelman Auditorium. The Casper Lecture Series was endowed by Miami alumnus and Middletown attorney Isador Casper in 1973, in memory of his parents Alex and Lena, who prized knowledge and learning even though neither had a formal education. Speakers include Dr. M. Joycelyn Elders, educator and US Surgeon General (former) (2013), Ralph Nader (1998), Beverly Sills (1998), Archibald Cox (1989), and General William Westmorland (1980).

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    • A Random walk in Science: from laser cooling to global warming by Stephen Chu

      01:22:51

      from justmultimedia Added 159 0 0

      DCU is delighted to announce that Nobel Laureate, Dr Steven Chu, US Secretary of Energy, will give the inaugural lecture in the DCU Nobel Lecture Series on Friday the 5th of November at 11am in the Helix. The lecture, 'A Random walk in Science: from laser cooling to global warming' will cover Dr Chu's Nobel Prize-winning research and his current focus on climate change and renewable energy. The lecture is open to members of staff, students, alumni, invited guests and members of the general public who are interested in global issues. The establishment of the lecture series was announced by DCU President, Professor Brian MacCraith, at his inauguration in July 2010. Over the period 2010 to 2015, six annual lectures will be delivered, one from each of the six categories of Nobel Prize: Physics, Chemistry, Peace, Economics, Physiology and Medicine, and Literature. The aim of the lecture series is to stimulate undergraduate students at an early stage in their careers by exposing them to world-class excellence, and to engage with the non-academic community in Ireland to raise the level of discourse around issues of major concern to 21st century society. 
Background information: The US Senate confirmed Dr. Chu as Energy Secretary in January 2009. He is the first Nobel Laureate appointed to a US cabinet post. Much of Dr. Chu's tenure as Energy Secretary has been focused on crafting a bolder, more science-driven strategy in order to combat problems such as climate change. In recent years, Dr. Chu has become an outspoken advocate for the need to move to carbon-neutral energy sources, and the need for the technologies that can allow that to happen. He also co-chaired a report for the United Nations that concluded that it is in "the best economic and societal interest of developing nations to 'leapfrog' past the wasteful energy trajectory followed by today's industrialised nations" by focusing on renewables, energy efficiency, and renewable energy. Dr. Chu won the 1997 Nobel Prize for Physics for his work in developing a technique to cool down an atom to a very low temperature (nearly absolute zero or -273 degrees Celsius) in order to trap and manipulate it with light. He and his team used laser beams to trap the atoms, creating what they called "optical molasses". For further details on Dr Chu: http://www.whorunsgov.com/Profiles/Steven_Chu http://www.energy.gov/organization/dr_steven_chu.htm http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1997/chu-autobio.html

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      • Summit Welcome and Keynote Speaker Steven Chu - 2013 UC Santa Barbara Summit on Energy Efficiency

        01:06:06

        from Institute for Energy Efficiency Added 100 0 0

        UC Santa Barbara Summit on Energy Efficiency May 1-2, 2013 Fess Parker Resort, Santa Barbara, California Summit Welcome from John Bowers, Mike Witherell, Rod Alferness (start - 14:15) Steven Chu Opening Keynote (14:15 - 43:50) Fireside Chat with Steven Chu and Jeff Henley (43:50 - end) John Bowers Director, Institute for Energy Efficiency Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering UC Santa Barbara Mike Witherell Vice Chancellor for Research UC Santa Barbara Rod Alferness Dean, College of Engineering UC Santa Barbara Steven Chu Professor, Stanford University Secretary of Energy '09-'13 U.S. Department of Energy Opening Keynote Address: "Materials Science Innovations in Energy Efficiency and Generation" For more information, please visit: http://iee.ucsb.edu/summit2013/Steven_Chu

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        • Sec. Steven Chu speaks to Employees at NREL in Golden, CO

          01:02:02

          from U.S. Department of Energy Added 486 0 0

          04/29/09 In an ongoing effort to expand domestic renewable energy, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced plans to provide $93 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to support further development of wind energy in the United States during a visit to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Secretary Chu also announced more than $100 million in funding from the Recovery Act for NREL facility and infrastructure improvements. Transcript: http://www.energy.gov/media/Secretary_Chu_NREL_Speech_Transcript.pdf

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          • Keynote Speaker Matt Rogers - 2011 Santa Barbara Summit on Energy Efficiency

            48:43

            from Institute for Energy Efficiency Added 9 0 0

            Lunch and Closing Keynote Matt Rogers, Director, McKinsey & Company; former Senior Advisor to Energy Secretary Steven Chu

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            • Department of Energy Swearing-in Ceremony

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              from U.S. Department of Energy Added 1,645 0 0

              On June 30, 2009, secretary chu administered the oath of office to his leadership team. A full transcript can be found here: energy.gov/media/063009doe-ceremony.doc

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              • The Keystone XL Controversy - 9.18.2011

                30:00

                from Energy NOW Added 173 1 1

                The Keystone XL pipeline proposal is one of the most controversial energy issues facing America today. If approved by the Obama administration, it would transport crude oil extracted from Canada's oil sands across six U.S. states to refineries in Texas. Supporters say the project would provide a secure source of energy and jobs, but opponents say oil-sands crude is a "dirty" fuel that will hurt the environment and worsen global warming. This week, energyNOW! looks into the Keystone XL controversy: is it an economic boon, or an environmental disaster? Keystone XL's Impact on America The Keystone XL pipeline proposal has roiled America's energy industry and environmental community. On the one hand, it could reduce U.S. dependence on oil imports from OPEC nations, but on the other hand, it could pollute some of the most environmentally sensitive areas of our country. Anchor Thalia Assuras travels to Nebraska to hear from concerned landowners along the pipeline route, members of Congress with very different opinions about the proposal, and environmentalists who are so passionate about the issue they were willing to be arrested during protests outside the White House. The Oil Sands Industry and Canada's Future The oil sands, which would feed the Keystone XL pipeline, have created thousands of jobs in Canada's Alberta province, and the extraction industry has tripled in size since 1995. Government estimates say the country may double its current output of heavy crude by the end of this decade. But some researchers and residents are concerned Alberta's economic engine is exacting a heavy environmental toll. Correspondent Michael Davie explores how oil-sands production is changing Alberta, and speaks with industry supporters about the economic benefits and with industry critics who say it's harming the air, water, and wildlife. One-on-one interview: U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu The debate over the Keystone XL pipeline is coming to a head, with the Obama administration planning a final decision on the project before the end of this year. Anchor Thalia Assuras sat down for an exclusive one-on-one interview with U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to discuss his views on the Keystone XL pipeline, the growing global demand for oil, and the environmental impacts of oil-sands development.

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                • Canadian Oil Sands & The Keystone XL Controversy - 10.9.2011

                  30:00

                  from Energy NOW Added 362 2 0

                  The Keystone XL pipeline proposal is one of the most controversial energy issues facing America today. If approved by the Obama administration, it would transport crude oil extracted from Canada's oil sands across six U.S. states to refineries in Texas. Supporters say the project would provide a secure source of energy and jobs, but opponents say oil-sands crude is a "dirty" fuel that will hurt the environment and worsen global warming. This week, energyNOW! looks into the Keystone XL controversy: is it an economic boon, or an environmental disaster? Keystone XL's Impact on America The Keystone XL pipeline proposal has roiled America's energy industry and environmental community. On the one hand, it could reduce U.S. dependence on oil imports from OPEC nations, but on the other hand, it could pollute some of the most environmentally sensitive areas of our country. Anchor Thalia Assuras travels to Nebraska to hear from concerned landowners along the pipeline route, members of Congress with very different opinions about the proposal, and environmentalists who are so passionate about the issue they were willing to be arrested during protests outside the White House. The Oil Sands Industry and Canada's Future The oil sands, which would feed the Keystone XL pipeline, have created thousands of jobs in Canada's Alberta province, and the extraction industry has tripled in size since 1995. Government estimates say the country may double its current output of heavy crude by the end of this decade. But some researchers and residents are concerned Alberta's economic engine is exacting a heavy environmental toll. Correspondent Michael Davie explores how oil-sands production is changing Alberta, and speaks with industry supporters about the economic benefits and with industry critics who say it's harming the air, water, and wildlife. One-on-one interview: U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu The debate over the Keystone XL pipeline is coming to a head, with the Obama administration planning a final decision on the project before the end of this year. Anchor Thalia Assuras sat down for an exclusive one-on-one interview with U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to discuss his views on the Keystone XL pipeline, the growing global demand for oil, and the environmental impacts of oil-sands development.

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                  • Canadian Oil Sands & The Keystone XL Controversy

                    27:01

                    from Energy NOW Added 265 2 0

                    The Keystone XL pipeline proposal is one of the most controversial energy issues facing America today. If approved by the Obama administration, it would transport crude oil extracted from Canada’s oil sands across six U.S. states to refineries in Texas. Supporters say the project would provide a secure source of energy and jobs, but opponents say oil-sands crude is a "dirty" fuel that will hurt the environment and worsen global warming. This week, energyNOW! looks into the Keystone XL controversy: is it an economic boon, or an environmental disaster? Keystone XL's Impact on America The Keystone XL pipeline proposal has roiled America’s energy industry and environmental community. On the one hand, it could reduce U.S. dependence on oil imports from OPEC nations, but on the other hand, it could pollute some of the most environmentally sensitive areas of our country. Anchor Thalia Assuras travels to Nebraska to hear from concerned landowners along the pipeline route, members of Congress with very different opinions about the proposal, and environmentalists who are so passionate about the issue they were willing to be arrested during protests outside the White House. The Oil Sands Industry and Canada's Future The oil sands, which would feed the Keystone XL pipeline, have created thousands of jobs in Canada's Alberta province, and the extraction industry has tripled in size since 1995. Government estimates say the country may double its current output of heavy crude by the end of this decade. But some researchers and residents are concerned Alberta’s economic engine is exacting a heavy environmental toll. Correspondent Michael Davie explores how oil-sands production is changing Alberta, and speaks with industry supporters about the economic benefits and with industry critics who say it’s harming the air, water, and wildlife. One-on-one interview: U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu The debate over the Keystone XL pipeline is coming to a head, with the Obama administration planning a final decision on the project before the end of this year. Anchor Thalia Assuras sat down for an exclusive one-on-one interview with U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to discuss his views on the Keystone XL pipeline, the growing global demand for oil, and the environmental impacts of oil-sands development.

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                    • A SILICON CRIME SPREE

                      21:27

                      from International News Resources Added

                      A SILICON CRIME SPREE. Part 1, Created by a group of producers and journalists editing collaboratively online. Stay tuned for a longer version. There is an article about this located at: http://www.thenewsdaily.org/?p=22177

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