1. Shrimp Fishing and the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Disaster

    02:15

    from Storm Surge Film / Added

    42 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Captain Mike Thornhill, a life-long shrimp fisherman, shares his experience working as Vessel of Opportunity (VOO) contractor in the aftermath of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil disaster, and how the incident has affected the environment, the Gulf Coast economy, and his personal livelihood.

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    • #helpMadridejos

      04:42

      from Lyndon Mancio / Added

      #HelpMadridejos was formed in light of the recent Typhoon Yolanda which brought about massive destruction to Northern Cebu… We are focusing our efforts to bring relief goods to Madridejos, the beloved hometown of our grandparents & parents.

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      • Hurricane Sandy storm surge over NW Atlantic region

        00:30

        from Philip Orton / Added

        312 Plays / / 0 Comments

        CAPTION Influence of wind and pressure on Hurricane Sandy's storm surge. Winds (arrows) blowing in from the northeast across the Atlantic Ocean during the days preceding Sandy’s landfall started to pile water up against the mid-Atlantic coast. Due to Earth's Rotation (and the "Coriolis Effect") the net flux of water moves to the right of the wind direction. As Sandy itself approached, atmospheric pressure (black lines) gradients from high pressure areas to the the low-pressure center of the storm cause water to rise under the storm, called the "inverse barometer effect". The animation here runs from late Oct. 26 through Sandy’s peak surge onto land at about 10 p.m. on Oct. 29, and beyond. The large image shows storm surge across the region, mapped onto longitude and latitude. The inset graph shows the surge height by the New York City shore at Sandy Hook, N.J., as does the mapped colors (scale bar at far right). Tides are not included in this simulation. CREDITS Sandy storm surge data and animations are from ocean modeling performed by Philip Orton, Alan Blumberg and Nickitas Georgas, of Davidson Laboratory at the Stevens Institute of Technology. Atmospheric forecast model data are from the NOAA National Center for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System (GFS). Computer modeling was conducted using the City University of New York High Performance Computing Center.

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        • Sandy NYHOPS hindcast of total water elevation, centered on New York City region

          00:33

          from Philip Orton / Added

          185 Plays / / 0 Comments

          CAPTION Influence of wind and pressure on Hurricane Sandy's total water elevation. Winds (arrows) blowing in from the northeast across the Atlantic Ocean during the days preceding Sandy’s landfall started to pile water up against the mid-Atlantic coast. Due to Earth's Rotation (and the "Coriolis Effect") the net flux of water moves to the right of the wind direction. Here, you can see how the tides peaked at the same time as the storm surge, leading to record-setting flooding at New York City and Northern New Jersey. The animation here runs from late Oct. 26 through the time of Sandy’s peak water elevation on the evening of Oct. 29, and beyond. The inset graph shows the water elevation at New York City's Battery Park, as does the mapped colors (scale bar at far right). CREDITS Sandy storm surge data and animations are from ocean modeling performed by Philip Orton, Alan Blumberg and Nickitas Georgas, of Davidson Laboratory at the Stevens Institute of Technology. The model used is the Stevens Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Model (sECOM), following methods similar to those used in a recent paper [Orton et al 2012; http://personal.stevens.edu/~porton/resources/Orton_etal_JGR12.pdf]. Atmospheric forecast model data (winds, pressure) are primarily from Rutgers University researchers Greg Seroka and Louis Bowers (using the WRF model), though remote areas and earlier days of the simulation are based on the NOAA National Center for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System (GFS). Computer modeling was conducted using the City University of New York High Performance Computing Center.

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          • Sandy storm surge animation and narrative

            02:56

            from Philip Orton / Added

            194 Plays / / 0 Comments

            This is an animation and voice-over explanation of Sandy's storm surge (color shading) -- the water level rise due to wind and atmospheric pressure -- along with wind vectors, and atmospheric pressure contours. The model simulation has been compared to observed storm surge measurements -- averaged across eight tide gauge stations, this SNAP (Stevens North Atlantic Predictions grid) simulation of storm surge has an RMS error of 0.15 m. This work is based on similar methods to a recent published paper on Tropical Storm Irene's storm surge -- Orton, P., N. Georgas, A. Blumberg, and J. Pullen, 2012. Detailed Modeling of Recent Severe Storm Tides in Estuaries of the New York City Region, J. Geophys. Res., 117(C9), doi:10.1029/2012JC008220. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2012JC008220/abstract It is also utilizing the same model as our NYHOPS forecast system (http://stevens.edu/maritimeforecast), and our Storm Surge Warning System (http://stevens.edu/SSWS), though with some differences. Sandy storm surge data and animations are from ocean modeling performed by Philip Orton, Alan Blumberg, Larry Yin and Nickitas Georgas of Davidson Laboratory at the Stevens Institute of Technology. Atmospheric forecast model data are from the NOAA National Center for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System (GFS). Computer modeling was conducted using the City University of New York High Performance Computing Center, supported in part by NSF Grant CNS-0958379.

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            • Sandy's Hidden Damage

              08:23

              from Thomas Halaczinsky / Added

              321 Plays / / 0 Comments

              One year after Sandy the discussion about how to protect New York City continues. “Sandy’s Hidden Damage” shows how the storm has changed the city forever – and how expert’s opinions on what will save New York clash while some New Yorkers affected by Sandy feel left behind. This is an independently produced video by documentary filmmaker Thomas Halaczinsky. Interviewees in the order of appearance. 1. Roland Lewis, President and CEO of the Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance http://www.waterfrontalliance.org/ 2. Dr. Michiel Schaeffer, Senior Scientist Climate Analytics http://www.climateanalytics.org/the-team/dr-michiel-schaeffer 3. Prof. Malcolm Bowman, Professor at the Marine Sciences Research Center (MSRC), State University of New York at Stony Brook http://msrc.sunysb.edu/ 4. Dr. Klaus Jacob Klaus H. Jacob Special Research Scientist Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory https://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/ 5. Susannah C. Drake Principal of dlandstudio http://www.dlandstudio.com/index.html 6. MoMA Rising Currents Exhibition http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/category/rising-currents 7. Derek Tabacco, Guyon Rescue http://www.guyonrescue.org/

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              • The Eye Of The Storm

                04:14

                from Jessica Nichelle Deaver / Added

                23 Plays / / 0 Comments

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                • STORM SURGE

                  10:37

                  from Ryan Osborn / Added

                  130 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  MBC Student Ministry - Storm Surge(June 2013)

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                  • Day 2 Keynotes: Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge

                    01:34:39

                    from CNS/CSPO at Arizona State Univ. / Added

                    8 Plays / / 1 Comment

                    Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Florida’s Vulnerability To Sea Level Rise Greg Kiker, Associate Professor, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida Informing Climate-Related Decisions When the Science is Uncertain Robert Lempert, Director, Frederick S. Pardee Center for Longer Range Global Policy and the Future Human Condition, RAND Corporation

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                    • TheDevices - Offshore

                      02:55

                      from The Devices / Added

                      21 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Hurricane Sandy was a devastating storm, one of the biggest ever on record & was described by some news sources as 'The Perfect Storm'. In the UK our hearts went out to those whose lives had been lost, their loved ones affected forever & whose homes & neighbourhood's destroyed. But sometimes from huge storms comes things of beauty, wonder & awe. We watched with fascination in the UK to see huge swells marching across the Atlantic Ocean, reminding us in their power that we are all connected on this planet, however far away. The blue screened foreground footage is filmed & performed by The Devices. The song Offshore is written & performed by The Devices. The news & storm footage is used without permission for the background footage. Non-profit, fair use. All rights of the clips & footage belong to: ABC NEWS, AFPTV, castle films, extreme storms, NASA., Meteo & other independent footage where information was not available. The wave in the footage is surfed by Garrett McNamara off the cost of Nazare, Portugal. The footage is from Nov 2011 & is not Hurricane Sandy swell, but it does show us what Europe sometimes experiences when the right swell & conditions conspire with the varied & exposed coastlines of Europe.

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