1. Building Soil for Stormwater Management - SustainabilityTALKS

    09:23

    from Sustainability Ambassadors / Added

    2 Plays / / 0 Comments

    David McDonald, with Seattle Public Utilities, describes the journey of yard waste and food waste to a state of the art composting facility and back to the soil in our flower beds, shrubs, lawns, rain gardens and bioswales. Shows how building healthy soil reduces the need for synthetic fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides on lawns and gardens, and the benefits of natural yard care through building soil health with regular application of compost. To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks BIO: David McDonald is a biologist and environmental scientist with Seattle Public Utilities, focusing on soil science and environmentally friendly landscape design and development practices. He leads the Washington Organic Recycling Council’s “Soils for Salmon” initiative, which is transforming development practices around the Northwest, and serves on the technical core committees of the national Sustainable Sites Initiative, and Washington’s ecoPRO Sustainable Landscape Professional Certification program. David has worked in oceanographic research, mountain lion research and forest fire management, operated a small farm, and taught agriculture and forestry with the Peace Corps. Links for Learning More… • Composting and natural yard care www.GardenHotline.org • Soil best practices for stormwater management www.SoilsforSalmon.org or www.BuildingSoil.org • Soil Biology Primer www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/soils/health/biology • Soil solutions to climate change: NW Bio-carbon Initiative www.climatesolutions.org/programs/nbi • Washington soils, soil testing, composting: http://soils.puyallup.wsu.edu/soils

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    • Identifying and Remediating the Sources of Pollution in Impaired Bangor Streams

      02:54

      from Lisa Taylor / Added

      5 Plays / / 0 Comments

      A student research project conducted through a SMART (Storm water Management Research Team) program.

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      • Heritage - Watermark PBS

        00:30

        from Mt Mansfield Media / Added

        5 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Are you concerned with the future of water in the Green Mountain State? Please take the time to watch a special screening of "What's Your Watermark?", the new documentary from the Heritage Automotive Group, on Vermont PBS. It will air this Thursday, May 28th at 8 pm. Then take a spin by the website to learn how you can be part of the future of water health in this state! www.whatsyourwatermark.com

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        • Vacant to Vibrant

          06:10

          from Ravenswood Media / Added

          337 Plays / / 0 Comments

          The Cleveland Botanical Garden's Vacant to Vibrant project has produced a way to turn vacant city lots into green infrastructure that mitigates the overflow of storm water while beautifying urban landscapes. The Great Lakes Protection Fund supported the project because of its potential to improve the health of the Great Lakes while addressing the quality of life for its residents. For more information contact Sandra Albro at salbro@cbgarden.org

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          • City of Newcastle's Stormwater Permit - SustainabilityTALKS

            03:29

            from Sustainability Ambassadors / Added

            6 Plays / / 0 Comments

            James Ricks, Student Sustainability Ambassador from Liberty High School, presents a case study from the City of Newcastle outlining the city’s legal obligation to reduce the impacts of polluted stormwater runoff, including the collection of stormwater fees from property owners and the services provided. Includes an overview of the NPDES Permit process, city policy and planning frameworks, the installation and maintenance of stormwater infrastructure, low impact development code innovations, and what every citizen can do to help reduce polluted stormwater runoff. To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks BIO: James is a Junior at Liberty High School in the Issaquah School District and a member of the Sustainability Ambassadors. He joined the Sustainability Ambassadors near the middle of his Freshman year at Liberty. Since joining the Ambassadors, James has learned to analyze sustainability trends and how to communicate them. His work with the program also led him to partner with his city government to start a Youth Advisory Board in Newcastle. You can often find James hiking the forest trails near Cougar Mt, or on his bike, meandering about the many roads and byways near his house. He also runs cross country and track in school. Links for Learning More: • City of Newcastle's Storwater Education webpage: http://www.ci.newcastle.wa.us/public_works/StormwaterEducation.htm • US EPA on Stormwater: http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/npdes/stormwater/index.cfm • Videos on Stormwater Pollutions Solutions: http://www.sustainabilityambassadors.org/apps/videos/channels/show/4083829-stormwater-pollution-solutions • Low Impact Development Manual for Schools: http://www.sustainabilityambassadors.org/lid-manual-for-schools • 20 Actions projects to reduce stormwater pollution: http://www.sustainabilityambassadors.org/20-action-projects

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            • CSO Basins and the Future of Streets - SustainabilityTALKS

              12:00

              from Sustainability Ambassadors / Added

              3 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Kristine Cramer, Community Relations Planner, with the King County Wastewater Treatment Division, describes how two-thirds of Seattle is served by a combined sewer system designed to carry sewage from inside homes and stormwater runoff from streets, rooftops, and parking lots in a single “combined sewer” pipe. During dry weather, all raw sewage flows to the treatment plant. When it rains, the pipes can become overloaded with polluted stormwater. This mixture of stormwater (about 90%) and raw sewage can overflow into lakes, streams, and the Puget Sound. Because of these impacts to water quality, the federal Clean Water Act and state regulations require that we take action and reduce overflows to an average of no more than one per outfall per year. How are King County and Seattle collaborating to meet this challenge? To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks BIO: Kristine Cramer works as a Community Relations Planner for King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division. King County’s goal of being a good neighbor is realized through the work of people like Kristine who engage directly with interested neighbors and other stakeholders to ensure that needed wastewater system improvements also work for the neighborhoods in which they are placed. Kristine’s favorite projects use green stormwater infrastructure to remove stormwater from the sewer system before it becomes a problem. Prior to joining King County, Kristine worked for 15 years as an educator at outdoor schools and later developing and implementing sustainability curriculum that focused on encouraging environmentally responsible behaviors in people of all ages. Links for Learning More… • Natural drainage solutions to protect our waters - http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wastewater/CSO/Solutions/Green.aspx • RainWise - https://rainwise.seattle.gov/city/seattle/overview • King County’s RainWise homepage - http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wastewater/CSO/BeRainwise.aspx • Barton CSO Control project - http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wtd/Construction/Seattle/BartonCSO-GSI.aspx • King County and Seattle Joint Green Stormwater Infrastructure Program – www.700milliongallons.org – will be live May 2015

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              • School Campus Stormwater Solutions - SustainabilityTALKS

                07:46

                from Sustainability Ambassadors / Added

                3 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Kas Kinkead, Landscape Architect and Principal at Cascade Design Collaborative, provides an inspiring review of real-world stormwater management solutions at a range of different school campuses, revealing the team design process, budgeting, engineering, installing and maintaining stormwater solutions on school campuses. To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks BIO: Kas is President and principal-in-charge of all educational facility projects at Cascade Design Collaborative (CDC). She has over 25 years of experience providing services in landscape architecture and environmental planning in the public realm, and has completed designs for over 90 educational projects, many of which have been award winning schools. Her firm has designed over 500,000 square feet of bioretention systems in the Pacific Northwest. Kas has served on the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction since 1999, and has participated in the development of the Washington Sustainable Schools Protocol. She was on the advisory committee for the Low Impact Development Manual for Puget Sound, and serves on the board for the local chapter of the Council of Educational Facilities Planners. Kas is known as an advocate for connecting curriculum to site design for school sites, especially around stormwater and habitat. A FEW SCHOOLS WITH SUSTAINABLE STORMWATER STRATEGIES Islander Middle, Mercer Island Mercer Elementary, Mercer Island Captain Charles Wilkes Elementary, Bainbridge Gray Middle, Tacoma Issaquah High School Issaquah Middle School Marysville Getchell High School Meadowdale Middle, Edmonds Muckleshoot Tribal School Valley View Middle, Snohomoish

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                • The Effect of Stormwater Runoff on Commercial and Private Properties

                  01:01:53

                  from The TASA Group, Inc. / Added

                  12 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  On May 14, 2015, The TASA Group, in conjunction with hydrology and groundwater expert Doug Beyerlein, presented a free, one-hour interactive webinar presentation, The Effect of Stormwater Runoff on Commercial and Private Properties. During this presentation, Mr. Beyerlein discussed: • Causes of flooding • Rainfall-runoff • How to measure precipitation, runoff and streamflow • Hydrologic computer models About The Presenter: Mr. Doug Beyerlein has 30 years of experience in water resource planning, flood studies and storm management, and is a senior hydrologic engineer and engineering group supervisor. He is a licensed, registered engineer in WA and CA and is a member of the American Resources Association and American Geophysical Union.

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                  • What's the Problem with Stormwater - SustainabilityTALKS

                    04:54

                    from Sustainability Ambassadors / Added

                    18 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Lorrin Johnson, Student Sustainability Ambassador from Liberty High School provides a concise, visual overview of the problem with polluted stormwater runoff including the relationship between ecosystem integrity and economic vitality in the Puget Sound region. This presentation is used to establish the need for the solutions-oriented SustainabilityTALKS that follow delivered by experts in the field of stormwater management. To see other SustainablityTALKS in this series and to learn more go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks BIO: Lorrin Johnson is a sophomore at Liberty High School and a Sustainability Ambassadors intern. During her time in the program, Lorrin has gained an abundance of knowledge on issues involving our planet and how to solve them sustainably. The program has strengthened Lorrin’s dedication to leadership as she continues to improve her public speaking and project management skills. Over this next year Lorrin is working with her Issaquah Team of Ambassadors to empower students and teachers in her district. She will accomplish this through teacher trainings call the Project Design Lab and through green team capacity building strategies that she is developing with Ambassadors from other districts. She hopes to ignite the same passion she feels for sustainability in others along the way. Lorrin is also involved in her school’s ASB, drill team, and newspaper staff. Links for Learning More.... • Protecting Washington's Water from Stormwater Pollution (Departament of Ecology) https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/publications/publications/0710058.pdf • How We Got Into Such a Mess with Stormwater: http://www.invw.org/article/how-we-got-into-such-a-me-1322 • Ten Things You Can do at Home to Reduce Stormwater Pollution: http://www.sustainabilityambassadors.org/10ThingsYouCanDoAtHome_Manual_SPREADS_lo%20res-4.pdf • Collection of Stormwater Resources for Educators: http://www.pearltrees.com/t/stormwater-educators-resources/id11955023

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                    • Low Impact Development Strategies - Sustainability TALKS

                      07:22

                      from Sustainability Ambassadors / Added

                      13 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Curtis Hinman, Senior Scientist and LID Specialist with Herrera Environmental Engineering, introduces the science and engineering behind the most effective Low Impact Development strategies currently being used in new construction and redevelopment to reduce the impacts of polluted stormwater runoff in our local cities. Features bioretention and rain gardens, soil amendments, trees, and rainwater harvesting. Special focus on the unique design, construction and water quality treatment of pervious concrete and porous asphalt parking lots that allow stormwater and toxic load to soak through rather than runoff. Liberty High School features a pervious asphalt parking lot. How does it work? To see other videos in this series and to learn more about SustainabilityTALKS go to sustainabilityambassadors.org/sustainabilitytalks BIO: Curtis Hinman is Senior Scientist with Herrera Environmental Consultants in Seattle, Washington. Mr. Hinman manages and provides technical guidance on a diverse portfolio of projects ranging from bioretention media research, low impact development design and statewide training programs. Before joining Herrera, Curtis was faculty with Washington State University Extension and the Department of Biological Systems Engineering, and was the University’s Green Stormwater Infrastructure Specialist. He co-designed and was lead scientist for the WSU Low Impact Development Research Program and is the author of the “Low Impact Development Technical Guidance Manual for Puget Sound” and the “Rain Garden Handbook for Western Washington”. Mr. Hinman earned a B.S. degree in Environmental Policy Analysis and Planning (specializing lake ecology and water resource management) from University of California Davis. He holds a Masters of Science degree with a concentration in stream ecology and watershed management from the Yale University. Links for Learning More… • Low Impact Development Technical Guidance Manual for Puget Sound: http://www.psp.wa.gov/LID_manual.php • Rain Garden Handbook for Western Washington: https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/publications/SummaryPages/1310027.html • Statewide LID Training Program (education materials): http://www.wastormwatercenter.org/lidswtrainingprogram/ • OPR video on LID in Puget Sound: http://www.opb.org/news/slideshow/efix-slideshow-neighbors-fight-stormwater-pollution-by-building-rain-gardens/

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