1. Adam Fure at Texas A&M Architecture Lecture Series

    01:03:36

    from TAMU College of Architecture / Added

    17 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Fure is an assistant professor of architecture at Taubman College and heads SIFT Studio, where he and fellow designers create speculative buildings, objects and installations. He spoke at Texas A&M's Architecture Lecture Series April 20, 2015. He aims to challenge the aesthetic and experiential norms of contemporary culture with his work in digital fabrication, material experimentation and design, which has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, the Beijing Biennale, The New School in New York, the A+D Gallery in Los Angeles, the AA in London and the Grand Rapids Museum of Art. For more about the spring 2015 Texas A&M Architecture Lecture Series, visit http://one.arch.tamu.edu/news/2015/2/25/spring-architecture-lectures/.

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    • Agora Interviews: June Manning Thomas

      10:35

      from Agora / Added

      81 Plays / / 0 Comments

      June Manning Thomas, Centennial Professor at Taubman College, is interviewed by Alexandria Stankovich, editor-in-chief of Agora. Topics include the roles of narrative and design in planning, the impossibility of precision in conversations about race, the implosion of the Detroit municipal service sector, and the inadequacies of traditional land use planning in coping with population decline in American cities.

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      • Albert Pope, Rice School of Architecture

        01:29:43

        from Taubman College / Added

        544 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Neomodern urbanism recognizes that a grid of streets is not essential to urbanism but is instead a product of historical circumstances. Neomodern urbanism recognizes that the circumstances which brought the urban grid into being no longer exist. From an existential perspective, the urbanism that we actively produce is the urbanism that culturally defines us. We are not defined by the grid-based urbanism that we inherit; we are instead defined by the spine-based urbanism that we currently practice. (Is it really necessary, at this particular moment, to point out that "we are what we make?") Until we embrace the urbanism that we actually produce, the best we can hope to accomplish is the design of modest, Bilbao-like projects of urban restoration. The worst we can accomplish, and often do accomplish, is the design of reactionary, class segregated theme parks shamelessly promoted under the banner of progressive urban reform. Piano at the Daimlerplatz, Foster at Masdar, OMA at Waterfront City, New Urbanists everywhere, begin a long list of apologists for the closed urban systems that are required to sustain the fantasies inherited from our outmoded urban past. In fact, these closed urban theme parks of postmodern urbanism exist precisely because the legitimate urbanism of our time has been portrayed as illegitimate or "sub-urban" in the eyes of most all who participate in urban discourse. It is the failure to overcome our collective attachments to the city of blocks and streets, and to validate the urbanism that is our own, that has brought about the present balkanization of the urban body. There is no more future to closed urban systems than to the urbanism of our past. Neomodern urbanism seeks redress... Albert Pope is an architect living in Houston, Texas. He is the Gus Sessions Wortham Professor of Architecture at the Rice University School of Architecture. He has written and lectured extensively on contemporary urbanism and is the author of Ladders (Princeton Architectural Press). He is a principal of zoneresearch.org.

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        • Alexandros Washburn, Department of City Planning, New York City

          01:32:08

          from Taubman College / Added

          608 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Alexandros E. Washburn is the Chief Urban Designer of the New York City Department of City Planning. He leads a design studio within the agency whose responsibilities include the design of public projects at various scales, city-wide urban design policy development, and design review of individual projects seeking approval under the City’s Uniform Land Use Review Process. In effect, his studio serves as the “design eyes” for the agency charged with planning the sustainable growth of New York City and the constant improvement of the city’s quality of life. Alex believes that an urban designer must work at the intersection of policy, finance and design. An architect by training with a degree from the Harvard GSD, he comes to urban design through a diverse career in Washington and New York, where the experiences of policy and finance combined with a high design practice. He developed policy expertise on Capitol Hill, where he worked as Public Works Advisor for Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the late United States Senator from New York. With a passion for public space, Senator Moynihan was the only politician on Capitol Hill to maintain an architect on staff, putting into practice Thomas Jefferson’s famous dictum that “design activity and political thought are indivisible”. Alex developed expertise in finance as the President of the Pennsylvania Station Redevelopment Corporation, which he founded to launch the transformation of the James A. Farley post office into a new train station for New York. During his tenure from 1996 to 2000, he raised $822 million for the project, led the award winning design and secured all necessary approvals for the project which continues today. In 2001, Alex became a partner at W Architecture and Landscape Architecture in New York City. The firm’s designs for waterfront public space, such as Harlem Piers, and sustainable adaptations of buildings and transformations of brownfield sites won national design awards in architecture, urban design and landscape architecture. In 2006 Alex was asked to join the Bloomberg administration and revive the Urban Design Division at City Planning, which had flourished a generation before under Mayor Lindsey as the Urban Design Group. In the role of Chief Urban Designer, he has built up a world-class design studio with associate urban designers and urban design interns who come from around the globe to work in New York City. His studio faces the daily challenges of designing in a way to grow New York’s population, make the city sustainable, and always improve civic life by improving public space. In his “spare” time, he has written a book on the on the nature of urban design with a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, and it is currently in publication. Alex lives with his family in the Red Hook, Brooklyn, and he commutes by bicycle across the Brooklyn Bridge every day.

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          • Antoine Picon, Harvard University Graduate School of Design

            01:08:14

            from Taubman College / Added

            687 Plays / / 1 Comment

            Antoine Picon is the G. Ware Travelstead Professor of the History of Architecture and Technology and Co-Director of Doctoral Programs (PhD & DDes) at the GSD. He teaches courses in the history and theory of architecture and technology. Trained as an engineer, architect, and historian, Picon works on the history of architectural and urban technologies from the eighteenth century to the present. His French Architects and Engineers in the Age of Enlightenment (1988; English translation, 1992) is a synthetic study of the disciplinary "deep structures" of architecture, garden design, and engineering in the eighteenth century, and their transformations as new issues of territorial management and infrastructure-systems planning were confronted. Whereas Claude Perrault (1613-1688) ou la Curiosité d'un classique (1988) traces the origin of these changes at the end of the seventeenth century, L'Invention de l’Ingénieur Moderne, L'Ecole des Ponts et Chaussées 1747-1851 (1992) envisages their full development from the mid-eighteenth century to the 1850s. Picon has also worked on the relations between society, technology and utopia. This is in particular the theme of Les Saint-Simoniens: Raison, Imaginaire, et Utopie (2002), a detailed study of the Saint-Simonian movement that played a seminal role in the emergence of industrial modernity. Picon’s most recent book, Digital Culture in Architecture: An Introduction for the Design Profession (2010) offers a comprehensive overview and discussion of the changes brought by the computer to the theory and practice of architecture. Picon has received a number of awards for his writings, including the Médaille de la Ville de Paris and twice the Prix du Livre d'Architecture de la Ville de Briey, a well as the Georges Sarton Medal of the University of Gand. In 2010, he was elected a member of the French Académie des Technologies. Picon received engineering degrees from the Ecole Polytechnique and from the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees, an architecture degree from the Ecole d'Architecture de Paris-Villemin, and a doctorate in history from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales.

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            • Anya Sirota: Objective Uncertainty Panel Introduction at Taubman College's Risk Conference

              02:26

              from Taubman College / Added

              71 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Assistant Professor Anya Sirota: Objective Uncertainty Panel Introduction at Taubman College's Risk Conference on March 30, 2012. Objective Uncertainty We live in an age of objective uncertainty, which is to say that we are objectively certain that these are precarious times. What we may be uncertain about – against a backdrop of environmental anxiety, financial crisis, and socio-cultural unhinging - is the architectural object's ability to do something about it. The stakes are high. If architecture is to re-establish a fundamental and critical relationship to existing political, economic, and cultural orders, if it is to take on a transformative agenda, then the conventional visual and formal tropes of prominence, continuity and monumentality may well need to be reconsidered. The question is, how? This panel will consider transformative design procedures – both risky and optimistic – that challenge accepted formats and redefine the parameters of architectural engagement. In trading programmatic determinacies for adaptability, finish for progression, or polish for opportunistic imperfection, does architecture expand its operating field and gain legitimacy as an instrument of change? Or is the acceptance of the architectural object's authoritative insolvencies too perilous a tactic in the contemporary environment?

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              • Anya Sirota: Objective Uncertainty Panel Response at Taubman College's Risk Conference

                11:26

                from Taubman College / Added

                41 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Assistant Professor Anya Sirota: Objective Uncertainty Panel Response at Taubman College's Risk Conference Objective Uncertainty: Response We live in an age of objective uncertainty, which is to say that we are objectively certain that these are precarious times. What we may be uncertain about – against a backdrop of environmental anxiety, financial crisis, and socio-cultural unhinging - is the architectural object's ability to do something about it. The stakes are high. If architecture is to re-establish a fundamental and critical relationship to existing political, economic, and cultural orders, if it is to take on a transformative agenda, then the conventional visual and formal tropes of prominence, continuity and monumentality may well need to be reconsidered. The question is, how? This panel will consider transformative design procedures – both risky and optimistic – that challenge accepted formats and redefine the parameters of architectural engagement. In trading programmatic determinacies for adaptability, finish for progression, or polish for opportunistic imperfection, does architecture expand its operating field and gain legitimacy as an instrument of change? Or is the acceptance of the architectural object's authoritative insolvencies too perilous a tactic in the contemporary environment?

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                • arch516 a04 representation - animation

                  01:45

                  from Daniel Fougere / Added

                  38 Plays / / 0 Comments

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                  • ARCH509 P002 aMAZEing

                    02:50

                    from Daniel Fougere / Added

                    33 Plays / / 0 Comments

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                    • ArtStart

                      08:41

                      from Taubman College / Added

                      763 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Providing a unique opportunity for a diverse group of high school students, the ArcStart program engages these youth in a 3-week summer program to expose them to a college architecture studio as well as life at the university. Out of the Blue Episode 312 www.ootb.tv

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