1. Actor and Musician Jeff Daniels | Texas Monthly Talks

    26:46

    from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

    81 Plays / / 0 Comments

    "It takes an unusual actor to inhabit memorable roles in both Woody Allen’s Purple Rose of Cairo and the Jim Carrey vehicle Dumb & Dumber. And Jeff Daniels is an unusual actor, to be sure. For decades, he’s lived away from Hollywood, focusing as much energy on his songwriting and on a regional theater company that he founded as he has on mainstream films." - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 3.13.08

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    • Actor Billy Bob Thornton

      26:46

      from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

      597 Plays / / 1 Comment

      "Oscar-winning actor Billy Bob Thornton worked an eclectic mix of jobs as a painter, saw mill worker, grocery store clerk and member of a ZZ Top tribute band before moving to Los Angeles in 1984 to make a career as an actor. Nearly a decade later, Thornton found success with One False Move and won huge acclaim and an Academy Award for Sling Blade in 1996. He’s followed that with a number of memorable roles and a career as a musician, with a new CD coming out next week." - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 4.16.09

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      • Actor Ethan Hawke | Texas Monthly Talks

        22:40

        from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

        317 Plays / / 0 Comments

        "Actor, novelist and director Ethan Hawke began his career long before he could vote. He’s received critical praise for his work on screen and on stage. And he cares deeply abut Texas, where he’s worked off and on for many years." - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 11.29.08

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        • Actor Matthew McConaughey

          26:46

          from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

          3,518 Plays / / 0 Comments

          "Lance Armstrong calls Matthew McConaughey a redneck Buddha. People magazine has called him the Sexiest Man Alive. And he has a new son to call him Dad. Think you know what the Uvalde-born UT grad is all about? Watch our interview, then think again." - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 10.01.08

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          • Actor Thomas Haden Church - Part One

            13:24

            from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

            138 Plays / / 0 Comments

            "As interviews go, this one wasn't heavy lifting. Quite the opposite. Spending thirty minutes in conversation with the actor Thomas Haden Church is more like play than work - because he's so much more interesting than his smart-alecky, towel-snappy demeanor would lead you to think, so much smarter and more thoughtful, so much nicer, funnier, more genuine, less self-aggrandizing. Which is to say, so much less of a Hollywood stereotype and so much more of the kind of person we all want out in the world who's associated with Texas, with our Texas, the kind who represents the state's best, puts on and wears proudly its happiest and kindest and most charming face. You know him, surely, from the two biggest successes of his career: just out of the box, new to show business, as dumb-as-a-wrench mechanic in the TV show Wings and, later, in his Academy Award-nominated performance opposite Paul Giamatti in the critically acclaimed film Sideways. Over the years he's also checked the blockbuster box, as a villain in the third Spiderman film, and has been nominated for an Emmy, for his supporting part alongside Robert Duvall in the TV movie Broken Trail. Playing in Westerns like that one and 1993's Tombstone should come naturally to 49-year-old Church, who lives on and works a ranch in the Hill Country and grew up all over Texas. Raised in Laredo, he's a graduate of Harlingen High School and the University of North Texas in Denton, where he got his start doing voiceover work. After twenty years on screens of various sizes, he's a familiar and comforting and, yes, entertaining presence - someone you root for no matter if he's playing the good guy, the bad guy, or something in between." - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 04.15.10.

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            • Actor Thomas Haden Church - Part Two

              13:22

              from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

              160 Plays / / 0 Comments

              "As interviews go, this one wasn't heavy lifting. Quite the opposite. Spending thirty minutes in conversation with the actor Thomas Haden Church is more like play than work - because he's so much more interesting than his smart-alecky, towel-snappy demeanor would lead you to think, so much smarter and more thoughtful, so much nicer, funnier, more genuine, less self-aggrandizing. Which is to say, so much less of a Hollywood stereotype and so much more of the kind of person we all want out in the world who's associated with Texas, with our Texas, the kind who represents the state's best, puts on and wears proudly its happiest and kindest and most charming face. You know him, surely, from the two biggest successes of his career: just out of the box, new to show business, as dumb-as-a-wrench mechanic in the TV show Wings and, later, in his Academy Award-nominated performance opposite Paul Giamatti in the critically acclaimed film Sideways. Over the years he's also checked the blockbuster box, as a villain in the third Spiderman film, and has been nominated for an Emmy, for his supporting part alongside Robert Duvall in the TV movie Broken Trail. Playing in Westerns like that one and 1993's Tombstone should come naturally to 49-year-old Church, who lives on and works a ranch in the Hill Country and grew up all over Texas. Raised in Laredo, he's a graduate of Harlingen High School and the University of North Texas in Denton, where he got his start doing voiceover work. After twenty years on screens of various sizes, he's a familiar and comforting and, yes, entertaining presence - someone you root for no matter if he's playing the good guy, the bad guy, or something in between." - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 04.15.10.

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              • Actor Thomas Haden Church - Q&A Session

                29:50

                from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

                250 Plays / / 0 Comments

                "As interviews go, this one wasn't heavy lifting. Quite the opposite. Spending thirty minutes in conversation with the actor Thomas Haden Church is more like play than work - because he's so much more interesting than his smart-alecky, towel-snappy demeanor would lead you to think, so much smarter and more thoughtful, so much nicer, funnier, more genuine, less self-aggrandizing. Which is to say, so much less of a Hollywood stereotype and so much more of the kind of person we all want out in the world who's associated with Texas, with our Texas, the kind who represents the state's best, puts on and wears proudly its happiest and kindest and most charming face. You know him, surely, from the two biggest successes of his career: just out of the box, new to show business, as dumb-as-a-wrench mechanic in the TV show Wings and, later, in his Academy Award-nominated performance opposite Paul Giamatti in the critically acclaimed film Sideways. Over the years he's also checked the blockbuster box, as a villain in the third Spiderman film, and has been nominated for an Emmy, for his supporting part alongside Robert Duvall in the TV movie Broken Trail. Playing in Westerns like that one and 1993's Tombstone should come naturally to 49-year-old Church, who lives on and works a ranch in the Hill Country and grew up all over Texas. Raised in Laredo, he's a graduate of Harlingen High School and the University of North Texas in Denton, where he got his start doing voiceover work. After twenty years on screens of various sizes, he's a familiar and comforting and, yes, entertaining presence - someone you root for no matter if he's playing the good guy, the bad guy, or something in between." - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 04.15.10

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                • Actor Tim Matheson

                  26:46

                  from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

                  417 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  "If a single part can define a career, then Tim Matheson owes it all to Eric Stratton, better known as Otter, the rush chairman who was damn glad to meet pledges of Delta House in the 1978 classic comedy Animal House. Yes, classic. While the humor may be a little broad and crude for the refined sensibilities of a PBS audience, you have to give the film's creators high praise for evoking what it was like to live and nearly die on the campus of a major American university, in the midst of fraternity craziness, at a precise moment in time. And you have to give Matheson gobs of credit for his pitch-perfect depiction of a handsome smoothie skating on the edge of expulsion for various misdeeds coerced and perpetrated. Matheson was a very youthful looking 31 at the time the film came out, and you'd be forgiven for thinking it was his Hollywood debut, but no - the Glendale, California, native had already been acting for more than half his life. At age 13, he had a small part alongside Robert Young on the CBS comedy Window on Main Street, and a few years later he was the voice of the cartoon hero Johnny Quest. A few years after that, he joined the cast of The Viriginian, and then took a part in the last season of Bonanza. In the years after Animal House, Matheson's ubiqiuity as an actor was established, as he appeared in everything from Steven Spielberg's 1941 to the Chevy Chase movie Fletch. Other than Otter, he is perhaps best remembered as Vice President John Hoynes on The West Wing, a role for which he earned two Emmy nominations. These days Matheson, who's just as youthful-looking at 62, is hot in demand as a director of episodic television on cable. His directing credits include Third Watch, Burn Notice, Without a Trace, Cold Case, and Psych. But in the minds of many - okay, in my mind - he'll always be the guy in the supermarket, flirting with Dean Wormer's wife, leeringly talking about the size of a vegetable that shall remain nameless. Hey, it's PBS, right?" - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 04.22.10

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                  • Actor Tim Matheson - Q&A Session

                    16:08

                    from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

                    632 Plays / / 1 Comment

                    "If a single part can define a career, then Tim Matheson owes it all to Eric Stratton, better known as Otter, the rush chairman who was damn glad to meet pledges of Delta House in the 1978 classic comedy Animal House. Yes, classic. While the humor may be a little broad and crude for the refined sensibilities of a PBS audience, you have to give the film's creators high praise for evoking what it was like to live and nearly die on the campus of a major American university, in the midst of fraternity craziness, at a precise moment in time. And you have to give Matheson gobs of credit for his pitch-perfect depiction of a handsome smoothie skating on the edge of expulsion for various misdeeds coerced and perpetrated. Matheson was a very youthful looking 31 at the time the film came out, and you'd be forgiven for thinking it was his Hollywood debut, but no - the Glendale, California, native had already been acting for more than half his life. At age 13, he had a small part alongside Robert Young on the CBS comedy Window on Main Street, and a few years later he was the voice of the cartoon hero Johnny Quest. A few years after that, he joined the cast of The Viriginian, and then took a part in the last season of Bonanza. In the years after Animal House, Matheson's ubiqiuity as an actor was established, as he appeared in everything from Steven Spielberg's 1941 to the Chevy Chase movie Fletch. Other than Otter, he is perhaps best remembered as Vice President John Hoynes on The West Wing, a role for which he earned two Emmy nominations. These days Matheson, who's just as youthful-looking at 62, is hot in demand as a director of episodic television on cable. His directing credits include Third Watch, Burn Notice, Without a Trace, Cold Case, and Psych. But in the minds of many - okay, in my mind - he'll always be the guy in the supermarket, flirting with Dean Wormer's wife, leeringly talking about the size of a vegetable that shall remain nameless. Hey, it's PBS, right?" - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 04.22.10

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                    • Actress, Author & Playwright Anna Deavere Smith

                      26:46

                      from Texas Monthly Talks / Added

                      115 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      "There may not be enough hyphens -- or enough words beginning with a -- to adequately introduce this week's guest, Anna Deavere Smith, whose many talents and many aptitudes make it nearly impossible to describe her: actress, academic, author, activist, artist -- the list could go on and on. The 59-year-old Baltimore native plays it high and plays it low: She's equally known for the award-winning one-woman shows she writes and performs, featuring characters she discovers in real life, interviews, and then portrays with perfect vocal and physical mimicry, as she is for the characters she literally inhabits on episodic television and in the movies. In fact, at the is point, she may be better known for TV shows like Nurse Jackie and movies like Rachel Getting Married than for her work on Broadway or on stages around the country or in the classroom, teaching at the Tisch School at NYU and NYU Law School. But that's okay, as it's all of a piece. One leads to the other; one enables the other. It's all art, and it's all craft. A graduate of Beaver College and the American Conservatory Theater, Smith is best known for two plays dealing with race: Fire in the Mirror, about the 1991 Crown Heights riot in New York, and Twilight: Los Angeles, about the Rodney King incident and the riots it inspired in L.A. the following year. Ever topical, her more recent work includes 2008's Let Me Down Easy, which puts the health care and underinsurance crises front and center, and 2009's The Arizona Project, which confronts demographic change in what has turned to be an epicenter of a controversy. The rare public intellectual, Smith always has something interesting and important to say, and her plain-spoken approach and easy-going manner quickly cuts to the heart -- as you're about to see." - Evan Smith, Texas Monthly Talks, Broadcast 05.27.10

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