1. Plenary II: Cost and benefits of policies and practices addressing land degradation and drought in the drylands

    01:42:13

    from GRForum / Added

    34 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Are the benefits of action worth the additional costs, or are the costs of action greater than the costs of inaction? This session will address the important issues of cost and benefits of policies as well as practices addressing Desertification, Land Degradation and Drought (DLDD). Despite the increasing impacts of DLDD, such as increasing poverty and migration, a global consensus on the increasing economic costs of inaction is missing. This makes the prioritization of measures to prevent or mitigate DLDD at the national and international levels substantially more difficult using an economic argument. The benefits and costs of counter measures could be analysed within a comprehensive cost benefit analysis (CBA), but is CBA an adequate tool and powerful enough to help decision-makers objectively choose among different land use management strategies and pursue effective and resilience building interventions? Are there other (non-economic) methods to evaluate the costs of action versus the costs of inaction? Where are the obstacles and where are the opportunities to improve the adoption of sustainable land management practices? Based on White paper II, the aim of this session is to find a consensus on the economic benefit of providing resources to prevent or mitigate DLDD. Panellists will discuss the rationale of including policies toward national development plans. The session will also address the need to build capacity for ongoing DLDD cost assessments at national and international levels and highlight possible investment opportunities. SESSION CHAIR: Noel Maxwell OETTLE - Rural Programme Manager - Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG), Nieuwoudtville - South Africa PANELLISTS Hannah BEHRENDT; Program Economist, Global Partnership for Wealth Accounting and the Valuation of Ecosystem Services (WAVES), Agriculture and Environmental Services Department, The World Bank, Washington, D.C., USA, "The bigger picture on drylands - using a natural capital accounting approach" Cesar MORALES ESTUPIÑÁN; Agronomist Engineer specialized in agricultural economics, University of Chile, Chile, "From science to policy; from local to global" Lene POULSEN; Independent consultant, Karl International Development, Frederiksværk, Denmark, "A system approach for valuation of sustainable dryland and drought risk management" Richard THOMAS; Assistant Director, United Nations University, Institute for Water, Environment and Health, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, "Analysis of decision making for sustainable land management"

    + More details
    • WED 5.1: Economics of Land Degradation (ELD) Initiative - Bridging the science-policy-practice divide - Mak

      01:13:26

      from GRForum / Added

      47 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Time: Wednesday, 10/Apr/2013: 4:40pm - 6:00pm Workshop organized by the ELD initiative Presentations Economics of Land Degradation (ELD) Initiative - Bridging the science-policy-practice divide - Making a case for tackling land degradation through valuation of ecosystem services Richard THOMAS1, Mark SCHAUER2 1United Nations University, International Network on Water, Environment and Health (UNU-INWEH), Canada; 2Economics of Land Degradation initiative Land degradation and desertification threaten fertile land throughout the world. The consequences are alarming: smaller harvests, reduced availability of clean water, increased vulnerability of the affected areas to climate change and, last but not least, food insecurity and poverty. It is estimated that 1.5 billion people in all parts of the world are already directly affected. In view of the world’s growing population, food security is one of the most pressing challenges of our time. The Economics of Land Degradation (ELD) is an initiative for a global study on the economic benefits of land and land based ecosystems. The initiative highlights the value of sustainable land management and provides a global approach for analysis of the economics of land degradation. It aims to make economics of land degradation an integral part of policy strategies and decision making by increasing the political and public awareness of the costs and benefits of land and land-based ecosystems. Our vision is to transform global understanding of the value of land and to create awareness of the economic case for sustainable land management in preventing the loss of natural capital, preserving ecosystem services, combating climate change and in addressing food, energy and water security. The discussion will serve as an exceptional opportunity to unite knowledge across disciplines and stakeholder groups to provide feedback to the ELD Initiative and suggest constructive ways forward. The workshop will focus on the achievement of the following objectives: (1) Obtain feedback from a range of audiences on the approach taken by the ELD initiative and its relevance to each audience; (2) Critically review the list of identified gaps and identify additional gaps; (3) Obtain feedback on the priorities allocated to each of the gaps to be filled in by the ELD. The discussion will unfold methodological and practical weaknesses and will provide fertile ground for establishing new collaborations or developing existing ones. The panel discussion will have tangible outcomes: It will both bring valuable input to the envisaged products of the 2nd UNCCD Scientific Conference, and provide a series of pointers for policy makers, researchers, the business sector and civil society regarding the cost of land degradation to society and the economy. It is also envisaged that the main conclusions of the workshop will be elaborated in the form of a short summary to be published on the ELD website (http://eld-initiative.org/).

      + More details
      • WED 4.1: Global Environment Facility Session: Carbon - a valuable global benefit of sustainable land management

        01:30:36

        from GRForum / Added

        28 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Time: Wednesday, 10/Apr/2013: 3:00pm - 4:30pm Special session organized by GEF Session Abstract This Special Session supports the two conference topic themes of (1) Economic and social impacts of DLDD; (2) Costs and benefits of policies and practices addressing DLDD. Therefore, we shall identify the following themes in our Special Session:(i) the significant investments already being made in the GEF LD Strategy and their impact; (ii) how a focus on carbon – above- and below-ground – could add value, economically and socially, to future GEF investments; (iii) how we can track and measure the benefits of SLM in terms of carbon sequestered; (iv) the policies and practices that will enhance the benefits brought by carbon in future GEF strategies. Our objectives are to: (1) demonstrate the importance of the current work of the Land Degradation Focal Area of the Global Environment Facility, with special reference to Sustainable Land Management – SLM – and the potential benefits derived from above- and below-ground sequestration of carbon; (2) show how GEF investments and strategic planning support the UNCCD; (3) consult the scientific community on issues related to SLM that might be included in future GEF Strategic plans

        + More details
        • CS: Closing Session

          42:48

          from GRF Forum Davos / Added

          11 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Walter J. AMMANN; President/CEO, Global Risk Forum GRF Davos, Davos, Switzerland, "Conference Draft Summary Report" Jonathan DAVIES; Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee, Nairobi, Kenia

          + More details
          • Plenary IV: Strategies and policies for local, national, regional and international level

            01:26:22

            from GRF Forum Davos / Added

            30 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Land degradation can be prevented, degraded lands restored and drought mitigated through sustainable land and water use techniques supported by relevant institutional measures and policies. Understanding the causes of inaction (or of inappropriate action) is the key in delivering effective land degradation policies. Policies and programmes should focus on addressing and changing the behavioural patterns that lead to land degradation. Moreover, it is uncontested that policies and programmes are better accepted in communities and by population if enacted by local councils than by higher authorities. The local communities must be empowered to manage natural resources and it is essential that the users of the land receive direct benefits from preventing or mitigating land degradation. Based on the previous plenary sessions, the White papers I and II and the Background Document, this session aims at discussing the transfer from research to policy making to implementation; how to balance policy making with top down and bottom up approaches; how to ensure compatibility between science and local knowledge and institutions; and how to implement efficient measures at local councils, regional and higher authorities as well as the main hurdles that prevent these measures from being realized. SESSION CHAIR: Jonathan DAVIES; Coordinator of the Global Drylands Initiative within IUCN's Ecosystem Management Program, Nairobi, Kenya PANELLISTS Mohamed BAKARR; Senior Environmental Scientist, Global Environment Facility (GEF), Washington, D.C., USA, "Investing in Policies and Strategies for Sustainable Land Management - Catalytic Role of the Global Environment Facility" Debalkew BERHE; Programme Manager for Environment Protection and Natural Resources Management, Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), Headquartered in Djibouti, Djibouti "The IGAD Drought Disaster Resilience and Sustainability Initiative (IDDRSI) as a global, regional, national and local strategic framework to end drought emergencies in the Horn of Africa" Chris REIJ - Sustainable Land Management Specialist - Centre for International Cooperation - Free University Amsterdam - The Netherlands and a Senior Fellow - World Resources Institute - Washington - USA - "Strategies and policies for scaling up re-greening successes" Christina SEEBERG-ELVERFELDT; Desk Officer, Division 314, Rural Development, Agriculture and Food Security, Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Bonn, Germany,"Seizing opportunities for sustainable land management through targeted policies and strategies" François TAPSOBA; FAO Chief Technical Advisor to the African Union Commission in charge of the Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel Initiative (GGWSSI), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, "Initiative de la grande Muraille verte et restauration des zones arides en Afrique Sahélienne"

            + More details
            • FRI 1.1: From agroecological practice to policy: bridging the gap in dryland management

              01:11:07

              from GRF Forum Davos / Added

              104 Plays / / 0 Comments

              Time: Friday, 12/Apr/2013: 8:30am - 9:45am Workshop organized by ILEIA - AgriCultures Network Presentations From agroecological practice to policy: bridging the gap in dryland management Edith VAN WALSUM1, Bara GUYE2, Prasad K.V.S.3, Janneke BRUIL1, Peter GUBBELS4 1ILEIA, AgriCultures Network, Netherlands; 2IED Afrique, AgriCultures Network, Senegal; 3AME Foundation, AgriCultures Network, India; 4Groundswell International, Ghana Successful innovations in dryland farming are mostly borne from the experiments of family farmers on the ground, with or without the involvement of scientists and civil society. Agro-ecological farming practices that use local resources to regenerate degraded soils play a large role in reviving dryland communities. Despite convincing evidence that these practices are successful in increasing production and resilience, this is not yet recognized in agricultural policy which continues to favour the use of imported technology, economies of scale, and specialization. This is the case even in ecologically fragile and diverse dryland areas where approaches depending heavily on the use of chemical fertilizers and other external inputs have rarely benefited small-scale farmers. Various institutional and political factors contribute to this gap between agro-ecological evidence (from practice) and mainstream policies/funding priorities. In this workshop we will explore the disconnect between the impressive spread of agro-ecological practices from farmer to farmer and from community to community, and the extent to which agro-ecology, as a practice and a science, is supported by policymakers as a strategy to address dryland challenges. We will start with a brief exploration of agro-ecology, which puts resilience of farming communities and their ecosystems centre stage. Over the past 28 years the global AgriCultures Network has been documenting and disseminating experiences of farmers, scientists and CSOs working with an agro-ecological perspective, through its global Farming Matters magazine and several regional editions. These experiences are the starting point for this workshop. We will have two short presentations reviewing successful agroecological experiences in dryland settings in Africa and India: K. V.S. Prasad (director of AME Foundation) will present experiences from South India where AME Foundation, over the past 25 years, has assisted many thousands of family farmers and their organisations in applying agro-ecological practices. AME Foundation engages in participatory technology development with farmers and scientists, often in a watershed context. Prasad will share lessons learned out of decades of knowledge brokering in the South Indian drylands, connecting farmers, scientists, consumers and policy makers. AME Foundation publishes LEISA India magazine. Bara Gueye (director of IED Afrique) will discuss West African experiences with agro-ecological practices to combat desertification, and their integration into policy. He will explore the factors that helped or hindered bridging the practice – policy gap. IED Afrique, an NGO based in Senegal with fifteen years of experience, works on sustainable development and citizenship issues, with emphasis on participatory approaches, promotion of inclusive policies and practices of decentralization and environmental governance. IED Afrique supports CSOs, farmers’ and pastoralists’ organisations and their networks, and publishes the AGRIDAPE magazine. A key lesson learned from these experiences is that strengthening agro-ecological resilience requires a fundamental change in agricultural investment patterns, towards enabling small-scale family farmers to develop their skills, expertise and voice, and towards full-fledged support for the upscaling of agroecological practices. Building on concrete and diverse experiences in the room and around the world, the participants in this workshop are invited to join in an exploration of the main institutional and political factors contributing to the frequent gap between evidence and mainstream policies, and in identifying and sharing strategies to overcome these gaps.

              + More details
              • THU 5.1: Towards a land-degradation-neutral world: from science to policy (Part 2/2)

                01:10:30

                from GRF Forum Davos / Added

                16 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Experts’ dialogue and workshop at the UNCCD Second Science Conference …the time has come for the international community to commit itself to a land degradation neutral world by setting sustainable development goals on land use, with targets towards achieving zero net land degradation. This Africa Consensus Statement, developed in Addis Ababa (25 October 2011) and presented at Rio+20, calls for concerted action to combat desertification, through the establishment of agreed targets on land degradation and rehabilitation of land. Yet the Rio +20 Outcome Document – “The Future we want” – falls short of these expectations by simply committing to “strive to achieve a land‐degradation neutral world in the context of sustainable development.” Although there is clear global interest in tackling land degradation, as evidenced by support for the UNCCD, parties to the UNCCD have concerns over the establishment of targets and over how the concept of Zero Net Land Degradation is defined as well as how it can be operationalized. Moving from science and political rhetoric to securing global commitment is a lengthy and challenging process. The First UNCCD Science Conference showed that targets can be established and monitored cost effectively. The second Science Conference will show the costs of inaction compared to the benefits of action. Nevertheless, science alone is unlikely to sway decision makers and other avenues of discussion need to be considered if global leaders are to take tangible action. The objective of this workshop is to examine law and policy options and pathways for reaching global consensus on how to achieve a Zero Net Land Degradation world, and to identify steps for moving the debate forward. Key questions that will be posed and discussed through the dialogue and workshop include the following: (1.) What do we mean by Zero Net Land Degradation? (2.) Where do the disagreements or risks lie regarding definition? (3.) What is the current state of knowledge on ZNLD ? (4.) What significant gaps need to be addressed? (5.) What steps must be taken to move forward in addressing disagreements and gaps? (6.) What difference would a Protocol to the UNCCD on Zero Net Land Degradation make, and what would it look like? WELCOMING REMARKS Luc GNACADJA - Executive Secretary UNCCD INTRODUCTION FROM THE FACILITATOR Jonathan DAVIES (facilitator) - IUCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) PRESENTATIONS: Alan GRAINGER - University of Leeds - "Zero Net Land Degradation: definitions and divergences" Mark SCHAUER - GIZ - "The economics of Zero Net Land Degradation" Lene Poulsen - IUCN Commission on Ecosystem Management - "The economics of resilience" Irene HEUSER - IUCN Commission on Environmental Law - "Options for reaching a global agreement on ZNLD" PANEL DISCUSSION: supported by the facilitator UNCCD Focal Point South Africa UNCCD Focal Point, and Chairman of the COP, Republic of Korea UNCCD Focal Point France (tbc) UNCCD Focal Point Costa Rica (tbc) Civil Society representative from CENESTA, Iran Sergio ZELAYA - UNCCD Secretariat Global Mechanism of the UNCCD QUESTIONS FROM THE AUDIENCE CLOSING COMMENST FROM THE PANELLISTS Documents:UNCCD Secretariat Policy Brief Zero Net Land Degradation June 2012: http://www.unccd.int/Lists/SiteDocumentLibrary/Rio+20/UNCCD_PolicyBrief_ZeroNetLandDegradation.pdf

                + More details
                • THU 4.1: Towards a land-degradation-neutral world: from science to policy (Part 1/2)

                  01:21:57

                  from GRForum / Added

                  55 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  Time: Thursday, 11/Apr/2013: 3:00pm - 4:30pm Part (1/2) Special session organized by IUCN and UNCCD Session Abstract Experts’ dialogue and workshop at the UNCCD Second Science Conference …the time has come for the international community to commit itself to a land degradation neutral world by setting sustainable development goals on land use, with targets towards achieving zero net land degradation. This Africa Consensus Statement, developed in Addis Ababa (25 October 2011) and presented at Rio+20, calls for concerted action to combat desertification, through the establishment of agreed targets on land degradation and rehabilitation of land. Yet the Rio +20 Outcome Document – “The Future we want” – falls short of these expectations by simply committing to “strive to achieve a land‐degradation neutral world in the context of sustainable development.” Although there is clear global interest in tackling land degradation, as evidenced by support for the UNCCD, parties to the UNCCD have concerns over the establishment of targets and over how the concept of Zero Net Land Degradation is defined as well as how it can be operationalized. Moving from science and political rhetoric to securing global commitment is a lengthy and challenging process. The First UNCCD Science Conference showed that targets can be established and monitored cost effectively. The second Science Conference will show the costs of inaction compared to the benefits of action. Nevertheless, science alone is unlikely to sway decision makers and other avenues of discussion need to be considered if global leaders are to take tangible action. The objective of this workshop is to examine law and policy options and pathways for reaching global consensus on how to achieve a Zero Net Land Degradation world, and to identify steps for moving the debate forward. Key questions that will be posed and discussed through the dialogue and workshop include the following: (1.) What do we mean by Zero Net Land Degradation? (2.) Where do the disagreements or risks lie regarding definition? (3.) What is the current state of knowledge on ZNLD ? (4.) What significant gaps need to be addressed? (5.) What steps must be taken to move forward in addressing disagreements and gaps? (6.) What difference would a Protocol to the UNCCD on Zero Net Land Degradation make, and what would it look like? WELCOMING REMARKS Luc GNACADJA - Executive Secretary UNCCD INTRODUCTION FROM THE FACILITATOR Jonathan DAVIES (facilitator) - IUCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) PRESENTATIONS: Alan GRAINGER - University of Leeds - "Zero Net Land Degradation: definitions and divergences" Mark SCHAUER - GIZ - "The economics of Zero Net Land Degradation" Lene POULSEN - IUCN Commission on Ecosystem Management - "The economics of resilience" Irene HEUSER - IUCN Commission on Environmental Law - "Options for reaching a global agreement on ZNLD" PANEL DISCUSSION: supported by the facilitator UNCCD Focal Point South Africa UNCCD Focal Point, and Chairman of the COP, Republic of Korea UNCCD Focal Point France (tbc) UNCCD Focal Point Costa Rica (tbc) Civil Society representative from CENESTA, Iran Sergio ZELAYA - UNCCD Secretariat Global Mechanism of the UNCCD QUESTIONS FROM THE AUDIENCE CLOSING COMMENST FROM THE PANELLISTS

                  + More details
                  • THU 3.1: Agroecology as a powerful tool for the development of drylands?

                    52:22

                    from GRForum / Added

                    15 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Time: Thursday, 11/Apr/2013: 1:50pm - 2:50pm Special ession organized by CARI

                    + More details
                    • Plenary III: Drivers of change and resilience increase

                      01:23:22

                      from GRForum / Added

                      21 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      To effectively tackle Desertification, Land Degradation and Drought (DLDD), and increase the resilience towards it, the drivers of change have to be systematically addressed. Social, economic, ecological and political drivers of change embed many different stakeholders, policies and solutions. Solving problems posed by global environmental change, requires coordinated research that pays at least as much attention to social sciences as it does to natural science. Paying attention to social sciences implies going beyond observation and monitoring of elements of biodiversity and soil status, to monitoring ‘human’ drivers of change, and how they affect both ecosystems and livelihoods. Additionally, while climate change, biodiversity loss and DLDD share common drivers or causes, the responses are also embedded in the same overarching targets and policy formulations. This session aims to identify the underlying drivers of change and policies that increase the resilience of ecosystems and people dependent on them, as well as the capacity of individuals, communities and systems to survive, adapt and grow in the face of changes, even catastrophic incidents. What are the thresholds that determine whether ecological communities can survive or not? Are some types of ecosystems more resilient to change than others? What characteristics improve resilience? These will be the guiding questions for the panellists that will represent the different fields of science and therewith highlight the possible collaboration amongst them. SESSION CHAIR: Michael Anthony STOCKING; Professor of Natural Resource Development/ Senior Adviser to the Chair of GEF-STAP, Global Environment Facility, London, UK PANELLISTS Elena Maria ABRAHAM; Scientific Researcher of the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research (CONICET), Director of Argentine Institute for Research on Arid Lands ( IADIZA ), and Professor of Environmental Planning & Management, Congress University, Mendoza - Argentina, "Challenges for sustainable development of drylands" Dennis GARRITY; Former Executive Director of ICRAF, UNCCD Dryland Ambassador, Nairobi. Kenya, "Transformative land regeneration" Mohamed SESSAY; Regional Coordinator for Africa for Land Degradation within the Division of GEF Coordination, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Nairobi, Kenya Ephraim NKONYA; Senior Research Fellow, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington, D.C., USA, "Can the poor afford sustainable land management (SLM)? Drivers of SLM in poor countries"

                      + More details

                      What are Tags?

                      Tags

                      Tags are keywords that describe videos. For example, a video of your Hawaiian vacation might be tagged with "Hawaii," "beach," "surfing," and "sunburn."