1. Cyber Roundtable with ACES Cybersecurity Students at UMD – CF018

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    This week on cyber frontiers Jim Collison comes to D.C. to join Christian and Ashton for a cyber roundtable conversation. We chat with students in the ACES cybersecurity program at the University of Maryland to gain their perspective on the state of the industry, educating students in the field, and potential future career paths for college students engaged in cybersecurity. With seven of us charging away at the conversation, we cover a variety of different topics with multiple viewpoints for the listener to digest. From recapping the biggest breaches of 2014 to discussing what it means to be a students pursuing cybersecurity in college, there is surely something for everyone to enjoy. Cyber Frontiers is all about Exploring Cyber security, Big Data, and the Technologies Shaping the Future Through an Academic Perspective! Christian Johnson, a student at the University of Maryland will bring fresh and relevant topics to the show based on the current work he does. Support the Average Guy Tech Scholarship Fund: http://theAverageGuy.tv/amazon WANT TO SUBSCRIBE? We now have Video Large / Small and Video iTunes options at http://theAverageGuy.tv/subscribe You can contact us via email at jim@theaverageguy.tv or call in your questions or comments to be played on the show at (402) 478-8450 Full show notes and video at http://theAverageGuy.tv/cf018

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    • Analytical Methods in Manufacturing

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      Peter Denno National Institute of Standards and Technology Abstract Modeling methodology is a vast subject, encompassing empirical and analytical means of discovery and numerical techniques. Design engineering and operations research are two areas where modeling can be key to success. In these two areas alone, the great variety of questions that could be explored, and methods applied, might make one wonder whether there could be, nonetheless, general means to integrate knowledge from models directly with other enterprise knowledge. A question that arises early is whether there might be value in treating equations as information objects, in the sense that system models, component data sheets, and production data are information objects, managed and interrelated by various software applications. Could exposing equations in this sense enhance knowledge refinement and reuse? Could it facilitate model verification? Agility? In this presentation I will discuss how NIST’s Modeling Methodology for Smart Manufacturing project is approaching these questions. We are using metamodels and semantic web technology to link equations into wider information infrastructure and support their independence. I will describe an investigation in which equations representing predictive models of a unit manufacturing process were developed and interrelated with production-oriented information. In on-going work, we are using mapping technology, templates, and trade-off analysis to formulate optimization problems, providing optimal process parameters. Biography Peter Denno is a computer scientist in the Systems Integration Division. He has 32 years’ experience in manufacturing research including 20 years at NIST and 10 years at Pratt & Whitney. His first encounter with metamodeling was 19 years ago, when he developed the Expresso EXPRESS validation system. He has remained involved with the technology since that time.

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      • Feedback Control of Bipedal Locomotion

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        Prof. Jessy W. Grizzle Jerry W. and Carol L. Levin Professor of Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Mechanical Engineering University of Michigan Abstract The fields of control and robotics are working hand-in-hand to development bipedal machines that can realize walking motions with the stability and agility of a human being. Dynamic models for bipeds are hybrid nonlinear systems, meaning they contain both continuous and discrete elements, with switching events that are spatially driven by changes in ground contact. This talk will show how nonlinear control methods are enhancing the ability to achieve highly dynamic locomotion. The presented experiments will primarily focus on our past work on 2D (planar) bipedal robots; a new 3D robot is being installed at Michigan and we will show some of the preliminary results. Biography Jessy W. Grizzle received the Ph.D. in electrical engineering from The University of Texas at Austin in 1983 and in 1984 held an NSF-NATO Postdoctoral Fellowship in Science in Paris, France. Since September 1987, he has been with The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he is the Jerry and Carol Levin Professor of Engineering. He jointly holds sixteen patents dealing with emissions reduction in passenger vehicles through improved control system design. Professor Grizzle is a Fellow of the IEEE and of IFAC. He received the Paper of the Year Award from the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society in 1993, the George S. Axelby Award in 2002, the Control Systems Technology Award in 2003, and the Bode Lecture Prize in 2012. His work on bipedal locomotion has been the object of numerous plenary lectures and has been featured in The Economist, Wired Magazine, Discover Magazine, Scientific American, Popular Mechanics and several television programs.

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        • Models of Time for Safety Critical Systems Partial vs. Total Order--Polychronous vs. Synchronous

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          Sandeep Shukla Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Hume Center for National Security and Technology Virginia Tech Arlington Research Center Host John Baras Abstract In safety critical systems, accuracy of time is important if the activities of the system are time driven, and the notion of synchrony is based on the accuracy of time. The synchronization of clocks for such systems and protocols come at the cost of an overhead of running expensive synchronization algorithms. Moreover, in recent times, systems dependent on precise clock synchronization are vulnerable to cyber-attacks. In the context of embedded real-time systems models of time have been a subject of intense research in the past two decades. Today�s systems with multi-tasking, multi-threading, and multi-core precepts have naturally multiple notions of time. This gives us the notion of polychronous time. Thus time is no longer unique or the same at all concurrently running entities, but they have their own totally ordered instants as their local times, and the instants in these local time sets are partially ordered with respect the instants in another thread�s local time. Thus polychronous notion of time frees us from the requirements of strong clock synchronization, and work at maximal performance in between synchronization points. In order to free the programming model from synchronous timing model, and making systems robust to clock synchronization failure based attacks; we have been advocating polychronous model of computation for concurrent systems. However, we do not advocate that programmers design programs against this model manually, or prove correctness themselves. We propose a dataflow model of computation which describes only the intended computation as a set of concurrent dataflows, and a program synthesis technique synthesizes multi-threaded code from such specifications. The generated code does not depend on clock synchronization, and each thread has local notion of time which are totally ordered themselves, and partially ordered globally. The correctness proof obligation is no longer with the implementer but with the modeler who would prove the properties on the concurrent dataflow model. The program synthesis engine of course has to be proven correct in order to claim correctness of the generated code from the model. Biography Sandeep K. Shukla is a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. He has published more than 200 conference papers, book chapters, and journal articles. He also co-edited or co-authored nine books. He is a recipient of the PECASE award, NSF CAREER award, Humboldt foundation�s Bessel award, a best paper award etc. He is an IEEE computer society distinguished visitor and an ACM visiting speaker. He is an ACM Distinguished Scientist. He is currently working with the US Air Force to develop techniques and tools for multi-threaded code synthesis from polychronous specifications. Model of time in computational model is one of his major topics of interest. His other research areas are in formal methods applications to cyber security, safety-critical embedded system modeling and synthesis, formal verification, smart-grid and SCADA security models.

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          • 2014-07-06 주일말씀

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            본문: 시편 139:1-18 설교제목: 자존감의 치유와 회복 http://www.universitychurchmd.org/ University Church @ College Park, MD

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            • Coding Theory and Access Control for Distributed Wireless Networks

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              Jie Rockey Luo Colorado State University (and former ISR postdoctoral research associate) Host Tony Ephremides Abstract Classical network architecture assumes that communication optimization should be done at the physical layer. Data link layer only determines whether and when users should transmit packets. In a multiuser system, under the assumption that data link layer should efficiently schedule multiuser communication activities, classical channel coding has been focusing on coordinated communication scenarios where users jointly optimize their channel codes and communication parameters. As wireless networks are getting increasing complex and dynamic, scheduling the communication of a large number of users in a long time duration can be very difficult. Consequently, a significant proportion of messages in wireless networks are transmitted using distributed communication protocols. In these scenarios, users are not fully coordinated to optimize communication at the physical layer, and therefore data link layer should often get involved in communication adaptation. Unfortunately, not only that distributed communication is not well supported by classical channel coding theory at the physical layer, classical link layer model is also not able to support advanced communication adaptation due to the simple binary transmit/idle options of the users. In this talk, we present a Shannon-style channel coding theory developed for distributed communication systems where users do not jointly design channel codes. We show that fundamental performance limitation of a distributed multiple access system can be characterized using an achievable region defined in a sense quite different from the classical ones. The new channel coding theory, which can indeed be viewed as an extension of the classical Shannon theory, enabled an enhanced physical-link layer interface where link layer users can now be equipped with more than two options to transmit their packets. At the data link layer, we formulate the distributed channel access problem as a non-coorperative game where each user optimizes an individual utility function. By assuming a general form of the utility functions, conditions under which the distributed channel access game possesses a unique Nash equilibrium is obtained. Simulation results show that when link layer users are provided with multiple transmission options, their behavior in distributed communication adaptation, as an outcome of the non-cooperative channel access game, tend to agree with the well known information theoretic understandings. Biography J. Rockey Luo received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from University of Connecticut in 2002. From 2002 to 2006, he was a Research Associate with the Institute for Systems Research (ISR), University of Maryland. Since 2006, he has been with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Colorado State University where he is currently an Associate Professor. His areas of research interests are communication networks, information theory, and signal processing.

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              • Bringing music off the page: University of Maryland Chamber Singers

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                Directed by Edward Maclary, The University of Maryland Chamber Singers have achieved international renown over the past decade with acclaimed performances of the most challenging choral repertoire ranging from the 16th through the 21st centuries. The ensemble made its first European tour in 2007 with a prize winning appearance at the International Musical Eisteddfod in Wales. In 2011 they were awarded the Premier Prix for Mixed Choirs and the Prix Ronsard for Renaissance Singing at the 40th Florilège Vocal de Tours in France. In August 2014, they will appear at the invitation of the International Federation for Choral Music at the 10th World Symposium on Choral Music in Seoul, South Korea. More: http://www.music.umd.edu/ensembles/choirs/chamber_singers

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                • Honors Entrepreneurs Video

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                  • Learning in Dynamic Systems with Unknown Models

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                    Qing Zhao University of California, Davis Host Richard La Abstract Since the first multi-armed bandit (MAB) problem posed by Thompson in 1933 for the application of clinical trials, MAB has developed into an important branch in stochastic optimization and machine learning and has found a wide range of applications in economics and finance, medicine, and industrial engineering. It has recently received increasing attention from the communications and networking research community for formulating and tackling the optimization of learning and activation in dynamic systems with unknown models. A mathematical abstraction of the MAB problems involves a player who can operate one of N arms at each time, with each yielding a random reward drawn from an unknown distribution when operated. The objective is an arm selection policy that minimizes the regret defined as the performance loss with respect to a genie who knows the reward model of each arm. In this talk, we present our recent results that extend the classic MAB theory in three directions: from exponential family of reward distributions to heavy tail reward distributions, from a single player to multiple distributed players, and from i.i.d. reward models to restless Markov reward models. Biography Qing Zhao received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering in 2001 from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. In August 2004, she joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of California, Davis, where she is currently a Professor. Her research interests are in the general area of stochastic optimization, decision theory, and algorithmic theory in dynamic systems and communication and social networks. She received the 2010 IEEE Signal Processing Magazine Best Paper Award and the 2000 Young Author Best Paper Award from the IEEE Signal Processing Society. She holds the title of UC Davis Chancellor's Fellow and received the 2008 Outstanding Junior Faculty Award from the UC Davis College of Engineering. She was a plenary speaker at the 11th IEEE Workshop on Signal Processing Advances in Wireless Communications (SPAWC), 2010. She is also a co-author of two papers that received student paper awards at ICASSP 2006 and the IEEE Asilomar Conference 2006.

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                    • Kalman and Kalman Bucy @ 50: Distributed and Intermittency

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                      José M. F. Moura Carnegie Mellon University Abstract We acknowledge that 2011 marks fifty years since the publication of the seminal papers by Kalman (Tr. ASME, Journal Basic Eng., March 1960) and Kalman-Bucy (Tr. ASME, Journal Basic Eng., March 1961). We consider estimation of a random field by cooperating agents and address two main issues: distributed processing and intermittency. We present a class of mixed time scale distributed estimators that interleave consensus (information flow among neighbors) with innovations (information flow from sensing.) We study conditions under which distributed estimation is asymptotically unbiased, consistent, and normal, being asymptotically equivalent to centralized estimation. With large numbers of agents, communication and sensors fail intermittently and the Riccati equation becomes a random dynamical system (RDS); we show that its sample paths converge in distribution to an invariant measure on the cone of positive definite matrices. This is the random equivalent of the Riccati equation converging to a fixed point as in standard Kalman and Kalman-Bucy filtering. Biography José M. F. Moura is a University Professor at CMU where he founded the Center for Sensed Critical Infrastructure Research and the Information and Communication Technologies Institute, a major educational and research initiative between CMU and nine Universities in Portugal. He holds a D.Sc. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His interests are in algebraic and statistical signal/ image processing, with projects on distributed algorithms, large scale critical physical infrastructures, bioimaging, and intelligent compilers for signal processing algorithms. He is a Director Elect for the IEEE and was President of the IEEE Signal Processing Society, Editor in Chief for the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, and a member of the Boards of the IEEE Proceedings and the ACM Sensors Journal. He received several awards, including Fellow of the IEEE, Fellow of the AAAS, corresponding member of the Academia das Ciências of Portugal, and the IEEE Signal Processing Society 2010 Technical Achievement Award. In 2010, he was elected University Professor at CMU.

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