1. The Glass Wall Fallacy - Associate Professor Timothy Pachirat

    01:07:43

    from HARN Human Animal Research Netwk Added 0 0 0

    'The Glass Wall Fallacy: reflections from an industrialised kill floor on the promises and pitfalls of transparency.' Timothy Pachirat is a Political scientist at University of Massachusetts, Amherst and is the author of Every Twelve Seconds: Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of Sight. (Yale University Press, 2011; paperback, 2013; Korean translation, 2012) Timothy Pachirat describes his work as a “political ethnography of the massive, repetitive killing of animals carried out by a largely immigrant workforce. In this book, I explore how large, everyday processes of violence that are seen as both essential and repugnant to modern society are organized, disciplined, regulated, and reproduced. I also explore how civilization, violence, and sight are related in surprising and counterintuitive ways.”

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    • How To Handle An Anthropologist, Session 5

      02:41:26

      from Frank Moore Added 604 7 0

      Recorded September 22, 1997 In 1997 Frank was contacted by Russell Shuttleworth, a then University of California, Berkeley, graduate student, working on his Master’s Thesis, which was a research study to help understand how men with moderate to severe cerebral palsy experience and interpret their search for intimacy and sexual relationships in the face of significant social and cultural barriers or as Frank called it, "The Sexual Practices of Bay Area Men with Cerebral Palsy"!!! He wanted to interview Frank for this thesis. That interview quickly segued into 12 years of him interviewing Frank about Frank's life. Meanwhile, Frank encouraged Russell to live his dreams which resulted in Russell aka Dr. Gruve, djing a show on our LUVeR internet radio station for years and playing the harmonica in Frank's Cherotic All-Star Band for many years. They did 88 interviews in all, even continuing via Skype when Russell moved to Australia to teach there. Russell is now a Medical Anthropologist PhD and a member of the faculty at Deakin University in Geelong, Victoria Australia. We have the first twelve of these sessions on videotape. We are in the process of transcribing and editing all of the interviews into a book that Frank named "How to Handle an Anthropologist".

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      • How To Handle An Anthropologist, Session 4

        01:56:32

        from Frank Moore Added 246 5 0

        Recorded September 15, 1997 In 1997 Frank was contacted by Russell Shuttleworth, a then University of California, Berkeley, graduate student, working on his Master’s Thesis, which was a research study to help understand how men with moderate to severe cerebral palsy experience and interpret their search for intimacy and sexual relationships in the face of significant social and cultural barriers or as Frank called it, "The Sexual Practices of Bay Area Men with Cerebral Palsy"!!! He wanted to interview Frank for this thesis. That interview quickly segued into 12 years of him interviewing Frank about Frank's life. Meanwhile, Frank encouraged Russell to live his dreams which resulted in Russell aka Dr. Gruve, djing a show on our LUVeR internet radio station for years and playing the harmonica in Frank's Cherotic All-Star Band for many years. They did 88 interviews in all, even continuing via Skype when Russell moved to Australia to teach there. Russell is now a Medical Anthropologist PhD and a member of the faculty at Deakin University in Geelong, Victoria Australia. We have the first twelve of these sessions on videotape. We are in the process of transcribing and editing all of the interviews into a book that Frank named "How to Handle an Anthropologist".

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        • "Building Indigenous leadership in research: what role can universities play?”

          48:51

          from Centre for Veterinary Education Added 0 0 0

          Presenter: Rod Kennett, Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Land and Water Research, Australian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies; Adjunct Professor, Institute of Applied Ecology, University of Canberra; University Fellow, Charles Darwin University Talk summary: Historically, Australian research has progressed from relegating Indigenous Australians to the status of non-consenting subjects to acknowledging them as participants, even collaborators. Further scientific enlightenment, in which Indigenous people are recognised, indeed sought, as research leaders is welcome and inevitable and here. My personal observations, based on over 3 decades as a non-Indigenous biologist closely engaged with the practice, policy and research of Indigenous land and sea management, are that Indigenous Australians are increasingly asserting their presence in the research sector by requiring improved ethical standards that respect Indigenous rights, by creating consultation and policy documents that identify Indigenous priorities, and by establishing organisations that access research dollars and nurture Indigenous researchers. The renaissance of Indigenous intellectual authority reflects a growing recognition by Indigenous people that research, particularly that led by Indigenous people, provides a means of re-asserting control over country lost through colonisation, of reinstituting traditional custodial responsibilities, and of building livelihoods based on the use and enjoyment of natural resources. In this talk I’ll examine several examples of Indigenous-led research involving community-based rangers in remote (and highly photogenic places) in north Australia. I’ll explore what I think contributed to their success - or otherwise, and attempt to contribute to the debate within the University of Sydney about effective ways to support Indigenous leadership and engagement in science. Bio: Rod Kennett is a Senior Research Fellow and leads the AIATSIS Centre for Land and Water Research. He holds a PhD (Uni Qld) and an Honours degree in biology (ANU), has published over 40 research papers and articles, been an ARC Research Fellow, and has led numerous research and natural resource management programs in universities, Indigenous, non-government and government organisations. He has worked in marine and terrestrial science and management in north Australia for over three decades where much his work has focussed on increasing Indigenous community participation in research and management. He regularly presents at national and international conferences including invited keynote presentations. In 2013 he was an Australian Fulbright Scholar studying Indigenous conservation-based livelihoods in Alaska. Previous key positions include Natural and Cultural Resource Manager for the World Heritage listed Kakadu National Park where he was responsible for research leadership and engaging Indigenous Traditional Owners in research and management activities. As Program Manager at the North Australian Indigenous Land and Sea Management Alliance (NAILSMA), Rod led the multi award-winning Saltwater Country Management Program (including the Saltwater People Network and I-Tracker) and represented Indigenous interests in a wide range of science related workshops and policy development processes. Wider recognition of his work is demonstrated by receipt of Landcare Awards and two national Banksia Foundation Environment Awards. Rod contributes to a wider conservation and development agenda through membership of bodies such as the Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee (Great Barrier Reef Marine Park), the Wunambal Gaambera Healthy Country Scientific Committee; the International Steering Committee for the Arafura Timor Sea Experts Forum, the IUCN Species Specialist Commission and the IUCN Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy

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          • "Free-roaming Domestic Dogs in Remote Indigenous Communities in Northern Australia”

            43:35

            from Centre for Veterinary Education Added 1 0 0

            Presenter: Courtney Bombara, , Honours Degree student Talk summary: Remote Indigenous communities in northern Australia support large numbers of free-roaming domestic dogs that move between human households and the surrounding environment, creating a link for pathogen exchange. The implications of disease in these communities cannot be predicted without a sound knowledge of the interactions and movements of these dogs in their specific cultural and environmental context. Courtenay Bombara will present her research results and personal experience working in remote northern Australia. This study involved investigating interactions between dogs using genetics, GPS collars and video camera collars. Bio: Courtenay Bombara grew up in Perth, WA. She completed school in 2009 and after a year of travel moved to Sydney in 2011 to begin a Bachelor of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney. Over the past year she has been completing her honours project under the supervision of veterinary faculty members Michael Ward, Jaime Gongora and Salome Durr.

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            • Oral Nicotinamide and Reduction of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

              01:21

              from Harborside Press Added 18 0 0

              Andrew James Martin, PhD, of NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, discusses a form of vitamin B3, which reduced the incidence of new non-melanoma skin cancers in high-risk patients.

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              • Oral Nicotinamide to Reduce Actinic Cancer

                07:20

                from Harborside Press Added 36 0 0

                Andrew James Martin, PhD, of NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre University of Sydney and Anthony J. Olszanski, RPh, MD, of Fox Chase Cancer Center discuss a form of vitamin B3, which reduced the incidence of new non-melanoma skin cancers in high-risk patients. (Abstract 9000)

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                • Cycles - Vivid 2015 (Video File)

                  02:12

                  from Will Jarman Added 2 0 0

                  The non-projected video.

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