1. Funk Parade IndieGoGo Launch

    01:25

    from Funk Parade / Added

    1,445 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Funk Parade is a one-of-a-kind parade, street fair and music festival planned for DC's U Street neighborhood on Saturday, May 3rd, 2014. Funk Parade celebrates DC's vibrant music and arts, the U Street neighborhood, and the Spirit of Funk that brings us all together. Day Fair (12-5 PM): Before the parade, the neighborhood will host a day fair, full of music, dance, art and spontaneous acts of soul, innovation and creativity. It's a chance to gather and celebrate and prepare for the mighty parade! The Main Event - Funk Parade (5-7 PM): See dancers, your friends and neighbors, a marching band behind them, and a drum corps. See costumes and getups and shiny things. Hear beat-boxers and junkyard drummers, see pot-bangers and clappers and kids on their parents’ shoulders. Horn players wander in and out of the crowd. A thunderous syncopated procession of groove, winding its way through the neighborhood, calling the city to the funk. Music Festival (7-10 PM): After the parade, U Street's finest venues open their doors for the city to hear some of the best music D.C. has to offer. One night, one city, one groove: the subatomic particle of love. Funk Parade is supported by over 100 local businesses, civic groups, nonprofits and community leaders, many of whom have given time, effort and money to support this effort. But we can't do it alone. We need your help! What We Need & What You Get Raising $20,000 from the community will help us hold the Funk Parade the city deserves. This money will go to the cost of the parade itself, particularly the police and permits which the city requires, and to the musicians and performers who will make the day amazing. This isn't another event to eat corn dogs and watch a band play. Funk Parade is about collaboration and involvement, about getting up and getting into it together, imagining it and making it what you believe it should be. What do you get? To reward our Indiegogo participants, we have lots of goodies including great perks from local neighborhood businesses, including: Awesome Funk Parade 2014 T-shirts from Twice as Warm (For every shirt you purchase they will donate one to Martha’s Table and other local charities) free drinks from your favorite U Street venues: Matchbox, Tropicalia, Local 16, The Brixton, El Rey, Right Proper Brewing Company and Satellite Room limited edition "U" Ball caps private chef dinners provided by &Pizza Ben’s Chili Bowl U Street Package catering and much, much more! What Do You Mean By Funk? Funk is the subatomic particle of love. Funk is anything that makes you want to dance. The Spirit of Funk is in the roots of DC music, it's on U Street. It's in jazz, R&B, latin, reggae, go-go, afrobeat, funk, soul, gospel and so much more. The Spirit of Funk unites, it brings together people of all ages, cultures and backgrounds. The Impact Funk Parade wants everyone to come into the streets to make music together, celebrate the city they love, and dance to the rhythm that moves us all. Funk Parade connects us with each other, and it connects our present with our past. Consider the following: With over two dozen music venues, U Street has more live music than any other neighborhood in DC. If you're going to hear amazing live music, chances are it's in the U Street neighborhood. U Street is also one of the most diverse neighborhoods in the city. U Street's history is one of celebration and music. These sidewalks have felt the shoes of Duke Ellington, Marvin Gaye, Roberta Flack, James Brown, Pearl Bailey, Ella Fitzgerald, and hundreds more. Other Ways You Can Help Some people just can’t contribute, but that doesn’t mean they can’t help: Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, and help spread the word. Use the Indiegogo share tools. On May 3, come to U Street and join in the Funk Parade! *** Funk Parade Indiegogo Video edited by Don Kim http://www.donkimmusic.com/ ***

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    • Os Kuduristas vs Lionz of Zion Dance Battle in Washington, DC

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      from Susan Jacobs, BlueZan Consulting / Added

      10 Plays / / 0 Comments

      As part of our Os Kuduristas campaign to introduce western audiences to kuduro, the authentically Angola music and dance genre, we staged street dance battles in Paris, Amsterdam, and Stockholm,. Last stop was Club Tropicalli in Washington, DC where the Kuduristas tore it up against internationally acclaimed, legendary dance crews Lionz of Zion and Urban Artistry at Club Tropicalia in Washington DC to meet up with local dance legends, the Lionz of Zion and Urban Artistry.

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      • B-Girl Exhibition Battle: Trinity College International Hip Hop Festival (2012)

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        from Nomadic Wax / Added

        470 Plays / / 0 Comments

        At the 2012 Trinity International Hip Hop Festival, Connecticut B-girls Trinity and Defy take on ShyRock and Hannah from Washington DC's Urban Artistry in an exhibition battle. Video Credits Series Producer: Nomadic Wax & World Hip Hop Market Dancers: B-Girl Trinity, B-Girl Defy, Carlendra 'ShyRock' Frank (CAB CRU/Urban Artistry), Hannah George-Wheeler (Assassins Crew/ Urban Artistry) Music: DJ Stealth Event Host: Kid Glyde (Dynamic Rockers) Cameras: Magee McIlvaine, Amanda Mansson, Andrew Bridge, Chioma Ozuzu, Michael Stewart Editor: Magee McIlvaine Producer: Greg Schick Venue: Trinity College International Hip Hop Festival in Hartford, CT. (2012) WWW.TRINITYHIPHOP.COM WWWNOMADICWAX.COM

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        • B-Boy Exhibition Battle: Trinity College International Hip Hop Festival (2012)

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          from Nomadic Wax / Added

          166 Plays / / 0 Comments

          At the 2012 Trinity International Hip Hop Festival, Connecticut B-boys Taipan and Wutang take on Kermit and 1 Mo' Round from Washington DC's Urban Artistry in an exhibition battle. Video Credits Series Producer: Nomadic Wax & World Hip Hop Market Dancers: B-Boy Taipan, B-Boy Wu Tang, Phillip 'Kermit' Chang (Assassins Crew/Urban Artistry), Giovanni '1 Mo' Round' Galleno (CAB CRU/ Urban Artistry) Music: DJ Stealth Event Host: Kid Glyde (Dynamic Rockers) Cameras: Magee McIlvaine, Amanda Mansson, Andrew Bridge, Chioma Ozuzu, Michael Stewart Editor: Magee McIlvaine Producer: Greg Schick Venue: Trinity College International Hip Hop Festival in Hartford, CT. (2012) WWW.TRINITYHIPHOP.COM WWWNOMADICWAX.COM

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          • Dance Battle--Lionz of Zion in Washington: Dance/Event

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            from Jeff C Oppenheim / Added

            101 Plays / / 1 Comment

            Kuduro takes the nation's capital by storm. Our Os Kuduristas dancers stopped by the hip dance spot Club Tropicalia in Washington DC to meet up with local dance legends, the Lionz of Zion and Urban Artistry. The night was high-octane! Rumor has it even the Obamas Kuduro now!

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            • DC Style

              04:40

              from David Bellard / Added

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              Footage of The DC-based collective Urban Artistry shaking the floors at BLENDED, the 2012 art event that brought together the worlds of street art and graphic design in a collision of music, art, and performance at a soon-to-be-demolished warehouse in the U Street Corridor. Super 8 film shot and edited by David Bellard. Soundtrack is "PM Please" by Anton Zap. The BLENDED art installation was presented by AIGA DC and ALBUS CAVUS.

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              • Urban Artistry

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                from Mark Judge / Added

                24 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Dance Bethesda.

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                • Trinity Hip Hop Festival 2011: Exhibition Popping Battle #2 (Assassins vs. Zulu Bratz 860)

                  15:48

                  from Nomadic Wax / Added

                  131 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  In April 2011, the Trinity International Hip Hop Festival hosted its biggest b-boy event in its six year history! The event was arranged by two of the world’s largest b-boy organizations: Mighty 4 (mighty4.tv) and Zulu Nation (local Chapter 860/Underground Coalition) along with Trinity College, Nomadic Wax and World Hip Hop Market. This exhibition battle was between Hartford's own Zulu Bratz 860 and DC's Assassins (partners with Urban Artistry). Assassins (DC) vs Zulu Bratz 860 (Hartford, CT) Rashaad Pearson (Assassins/Urban Artistry) Ryan "Future" Webb (Assassins/Urban Artistry)
 www.urbanartistry.org http://www.facebook.com/pages/Chapter-860-Zulu-Bratz/106406672725310 WWW.TRINITYHIPHOP.ORG PRODUCED BY NOMADIC WAX EXEC. PRODUCER: MAGEE MCILVAINE CO-PRODUCER: GREG SCHICK 1ST CAMERA: MAGEE MCILVAINE 2ND CAMERA: BEN HERSON 3RD CAMERA: TONY JOHANSSON EDITOR: MAGEE MCILVAINE ASSISTANT EDITOR: JASMINE RAO

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                  • Trinity Hip Hop Festival 2011: Exhibition B-Boy Battle #2 (Zulu Bratz vs. Urban Artistry)

                    10:57

                    from Nomadic Wax / Added

                    164 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    In April 2011, the Trinity International Hip Hop Festival hosted its biggest b-boy event in its six year history! The event was arranged by two of the world’s largest b-boy organizations: Mighty 4 (mighty4.tv) and Zulu Nation (local Chapter 860/Underground Coalition) along with Trinity College, Nomadic Wax and World Hip Hop Market. This clip features Hartford's Zulu Bratz vs. DC's Urban Artistry in a 2v2 exhibition battle. Assassins/Urban Artistry (DC) vs Zulu Bratz 860 (Hartford, CT) Russell "Ironman" Campbell (CAB CRU/Urban Artistry) Gabe "SHAMROCK" Lipton Galbraith (Assassins/Urban Artistry) www.urbanartistry.org http://www.facebook.com/pages/Chapter-860-Zulu-Bratz/106406672725310 WWW.TRINITYHIPHOP.ORG PRODUCED BY NOMADIC WAX EXEC. PRODUCER: MAGEE MCILVAINE CO-PRODUCER: GREG SCHICK 1ST CAMERA: MAGEE MCILVAINE 2ND CAMERA: BEN HERSON 3RD CAMERA: TONY JOHANSSON EDITOR: MAGEE MCILVAINE ASSISTANT EDITOR: JASMINE RAO

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                    • March 2011: South Africa & Washington DC Arts Exchange and Workshop Tour

                      13:16

                      from Nomadic Wax / Added

                      592 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      EDITOR: PRINCESS HAIRSTON 1ST CAMERA: MAGEE 2ND CAMERA: MEGAN KEEFE ADDITIONAL FOOTAGE: WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS MUSIC: BLACK NOISE, DJ PLAIN VIEW, SUBATOMIC SOUND SYSTEM FEATURING: EMILE YX, HOUSE, DJ THEE ANGELO, B-BOY MOUSE, B-BENNY, B-BOY DANNY, MAGEE EXCHANGE PRODUCED BY: HEAL THE HOOD, NOMADIC WAX, U.S. STATE DEPARTMENT, URBAN ARTISTRY VIDEO PRODUCED BY: NOMADIC WAX in collaboration with all co-sponsors Read the project report here: http://nomadicwax.com/2011/04/cultural-exchange-south-africa-and-usa-youth-development-through-hip-hop-dance-and-culture/ April 12, 2011, Washington DC On March 14th, 2011, Junious Brickhouse, aka House (Urban Artistry), and I (Nomadic Wax) traveled from Washington DC to Cape Town as cultural envoys with the US State Department. The 2011 exchange had grown out of a project initiated by Nomadic Wax and myself during the summer of 2010. This project, The 2010 Cape Town 2 DC arts exchange, brought two of South Africa’s leading hip hop artist activists, DJ Thee Angelo and Emile YX?, to Washington DC for two weeks of collaboration with local artists and activists. As members of Black Noise (one of South Africa’s first hip hop groups and dance crews), arts activists, and educators with the non- profit Heal the Hood, these two artists were able to contribute indispensable knowledge and experience to the program. Working with artists like former State Department Hip Hop Ambassador Kokayi, B-Boy IronMan, Flex Mathews, and DJ RBI (of Words, Beats, Life, Inc), we created a space to share strategies, workflows, and methodology. Among the many partnerships the exchange created, the strongest relationship was formed with DC dance collective Urban Artistry. Upon their return to South Africa, Heal the Hood began to work with the US Consulate in Cape Town to plan a return exchange, and to further strengthen the relationships that had been formed between the two arts communities. Heal the Hood?s partnership with the consulate resulted in the organizing of the second installment of the exchange which began in 2010. As representatives of US hip hop culture and our respective art forms, Junious and I were invited to South Africa to further strengthen the relationship with Heal the Hood and the South African arts community, as well as connect and work directly with local youth throughout the country. The mission of the project was to both identify and connect with underserved youth in the townships of Cape Town, Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Durban. As both role models and educators, we were to conduct workshops with youth within our respective fields of expertise: ‘house’ dance & film. Upon touchdown in Cape Town, it soon became apparent how dramatic the need for sustained youth work and arts activism is in Cape Town. This need was further reflected in the other locations we visited during the trip. Cape Town, and South Africa as a whole, is an extremely complex place. In Cape Town specifically, we were immediately welcomed into the realities of life in the so- called ?colored? communities throughout Mitchell?s Plain. This area is considered to have some of the worst gang-related violence in the world, and it is safe to say that young people in these neighborhoods are faced with very hard decisions on a daily basis. It was truly an honor to witness the work of Heal The Hood in these communities. Their approach is extremely effective and their access is unparalleled. Through dance and hip hop culture as a whole, Emile and his crew of young educators—who come from the very same neighborhoods– are able to foster the confidence of these young boys and girls, instilling in them a new sense of identity. They help these youth re-contextualize the idea of being ?African? as something positive– a message that is very much absent in many of the communities we visited. Their model for working with at-risk youth in the often-ignored black Afrikaans communities is very impressive. For more information on this community, watch this short film. South African youth love Kwaito, which is the country’s own version of House music. Despite the prevalence of House music, knowledge of the actual dance techniques and the music genre?s history is somewhat lacking. Junious is a pro. I was very impressed with how he was able to jump into any situation and get kids (sometimes groups of 20, sometimes around 100) moving and having fun, while telling them the story of the music, and contextualizing it for them. In communities with few opportunities for traditional career paths, dance can be a way out. What is impressive about Junious and Emile?s work is that it places equal importance on technical skill, as well as building confidence and love for one’s-self. Not everyone will be able to tour the world like Black Noise have, but confidence and self-worth are important in all aspects of life. As for me, my workshops focused on the basics of filmmaking. They were generally made up of kids who were very curious about film (especially horror films as a matter of fact) and dying to know how special effects worked, as well as the kids who were too shy to participate in the dance workshops. Knowing time constraints and equipment access were going to be an issue, I constructed my film workshops to focus on several key points. First, despite the vast economic disparities in South Africa, filmmaking is not an unattainable career for township youth. Second, through cell phone technology, almost every youth has access to the equipment they would need to start down the path of professional filmmaking. At their core, the workshops were about instilling in the participants the confidence to pursue film as a tangible career path, despite the challenges they might face. I believe that this approach worked quite well. One of the most memorable moments was when a young albino girl in a Township outside of Pretoria who demanded we shoot a short solo performance she had created, complete with characters and voices. Though very shy outside the workshop, when given access to a camera, her whole demeanor changed into that of a superstar. When I explained that she actually had access to cameras all along, through cell phones, she left the workshop both excited and motivated to continue filming herself and others. On a personal level, I learned a great deal from this experience. I have worked all across Africa, but this was my first project in South Africa. All the young people we worked with were hungry for the skills we were teaching. In fact, many already had the skills, but lacked the confidence to use them. With the level of racial tension, economic disparity, and a local division throughout South Africa, this kind of work with youth is all the more important. Organizations like Heal the Hood are doing incredible work on a local level, and we met arts activists at different centers throughout the country doing similarly positive work. These kinds of projects need to be supported and expanded. I am in touch with a large number of people who either participated in one of my workshops, or hosted our program. I am working on potential collaborative projects and mentorships for some of the bright young filmmakers we met along the way. Magee McIlvaine Nomadic Wax, Creative Director

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